1789
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1789

1789 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar1789
MDCCLXXXIX
Ab urbe condita2542
Armenian calendar1238
?
Assyrian calendar6539
Balinese saka calendar1710-1711
Bengali calendar1196
Berber calendar2739
British Regnal year29 Geo. 3 - 30 Geo. 3
Buddhist calendar2333
Burmese calendar1151
Byzantine calendar7297-7298
Chinese calendar? (Earth Monkey)
4485 or 4425
    -- to --
(Earth Rooster)
4486 or 4426
Coptic calendar1505-1506
Discordian calendar2955
Ethiopian calendar1781-1782
Hebrew calendar5549-5550
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat1845-1846
 - Shaka Samvat1710-1711
 - Kali Yuga4889-4890
Holocene calendar11789
Igbo calendar789-790
Iranian calendar1167-1168
Islamic calendar1203-1204
Japanese calendarTenmei 9 / Kansei 1
(?)
Javanese calendar1715-1716
Julian calendarGregorian minus 11 days
Korean calendar4122
Minguo calendar123 before ROC
123?
Nanakshahi calendar321
Thai solar calendar2331-2332
Tibetan calendar?
(male Earth-Monkey)
1915 or 1534 or 762
    -- to --
?
(female Earth-Rooster)
1916 or 1535 or 763

1789 (MDCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1789th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 789th year of the 2nd millennium, the 89th year of the 18th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1780s decade. As of the start of 1789, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Events

January–March

April 30: First President of the United States, George Washington, elected.

April–June

July–September

October–December

Date unknown

Births

Deaths

References

  1. ^ "219 years ago - Description of a Slave Ship". Rare Book Collections @ Princeton. Princeton University Library. 2008. Archived from the original on February 4, 2014. Retrieved 2013.
  2. ^ "The Brookes - visualising the transatlantic slave trade". 1807 Commemorated. University of York Institute for the Public Understanding of the Past. 2007. Retrieved 2013.
  3. ^ "Fires, Great", in The Insurance Cyclopeadia: Being an Historical Treasury of Events and Circumstances Connected with the Origin and Progress of Insurance, Cornelius Walford, ed. (C. and E. Layton, 1876) p61
  4. ^ a b c d e f g Harper's Encyclopaedia of United States History from 458 A. D. to 1909, ed. by Benson John Lossing and, Woodrow Wilson (Harper & Brothers, 1910) p168-169
  5. ^ "The establishment of the Department of War". clerk.house.gov. Archived from the original on March 7, 2011.
  6. ^ Adamson, Barry (2008). Freedom of Religion, the First Amendment, and the Supreme Court: How the Court Flunked History. Pelican Publishing. p. 93.
  7. ^ Journal of the House of Representatives of the United States, 1789-1793, August 21, 1789, p. 85
  8. ^ "The First Supreme Court". History.com. Archived from the original on May 1, 2009. Retrieved 2008.
  9. ^ "BBC History British History Timeline". Archived from the original on September 9, 2007. Retrieved 2007.

Further reading


  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

1789
 



 



 
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