1790s
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1790s
AbolitionismPeking operaMetric systemLithographyEdward Jenner#Invention of the vaccineReign of TerrorCotton gin1796 United States presidential election
From top left, clockwise: Atlantic slave trade and abolitionism gain momentum over Europe and the Americas, as bans began to be enacted in countries such as Denmark-Norway (1803), the United Kingdom (1807), and Union States of the United States (1808) in the subsequent decade, following movements and upheavals of awareness at this period; Now-iconic Peking opera was conceived after the Four Great Anhui Troupes were brought into the dynasty capital to perform in Beijing, sometime in 1790; The metric system is formally adopted for the first time in France after receiving recommendation from its Commission of Weights and Measures. This set the metric system as a global default of measures and trail-blazed its universal acceptance as the standard of measures, outpacing the imperial system in the process; Smallpox vaccine was created in 1796 by British doctor Edward Jenner; a patent that would unknowingly lead to the eradication of smallpox, directly contributing to the world's first and only successful disease eradication campaign; The United States' very first contested presidential elections took place in 1796, who was eventually won over by John Adams; The cotton gin was first formally patented and came into industrial use in 1793, by American Eli Whitney. The modernized version of the engine paved way for much of the Industrial Revolution and enabled the textile industry to evolve and flourish more, due to its ability to separate cotton; French Revolutionary Wars broke out and culminated at this decade, where events such as the Reign of Terror (pictured) and the establishment of the French First Republic set off frenzied politics, birthing the idea of modern-day political spectrum in the process; Lithography was invented, revolutionising print methods, and increasing pragmatism over information processing.

The 1790s (pronounced "seventeen-nineties") was a decade of the Gregorian calendar that began on January 1, 1790, and ended on December 31, 1799. Considered as some of the Industrial Revolution's earlier days, the 1790s called for the start of an anti-imperialist world, as new democracies such as the French First Republic and the United States of America began flourishing at this era. Revolutions - both political and social - forever transformed global politics and art, as wars such as the French Revolutionary Wars and the American Revolutionary War moulded modern-day concepts of liberalism, partisanship, elections, and the political compass.

Events

1790

January–March

April–June

July–September

October–December

1791

January–March

April–June

July–September

October–December

Date unknown

1792

January–March

April–June

July–September

October–December

Date unknown

1793

January–June

July–December

Undated

1794

January–March

April–June

July–September

July 27: Robespierre and Saint-Just are arrested

October–December

Date unknown

1795

Map of India in 1795, map indicates the political end of the Mogul dynasty in India.

January–June

July–December

Undated

1796

January–March

April–June

July–September

October–December

Date unknown

  • The Spanish government lifts the restrictions against neutrals trading with the colonies, thus acknowledging Spain's inability to supply the colonies with needed goods and markets.
  • Robert Burns's version of the Scots poem Auld Lang Syne is first published, in this year's volume of The Scots Musical Museum.[61]
  • Annual British iron production reaches 125,000 tons.

1797

January–March

April–June

July–September

October–December

Undated

1798

January–June

July–December

Date unknown

1799

January-June

July-December

Date unknown

World leaders

1790 - 1791 - 1792 - 1793 - 1794 - 1795 - 1796 - 1797 - 1798 - 1799

Significant people

References

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1790s
 



 



 
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