1993 College Baseball All-America Team
Get 1993 College Baseball All-America Team essential facts below. View Videos or join the 1993 College Baseball All-America Team discussion. Add 1993 College Baseball All-America Team to your PopFlock.com topic list for future reference or share this resource on social media.
1993 College Baseball All-America Team

An All-American team is an honorary sports team composed of the best amateur players of a specific season for each position--who in turn are given the honorific "All-America" and typically referred to as "All-American athletes", or simply "All-Americans". Although the honorees generally do not compete as a unit, the term is used in U.S. team sports to refer to players who are selected by members of the national media. Walter Camp selected the first All-America team in the early days of American football in 1889.[1] In 1950, the American Baseball Coaches Association (ABCA) selected its first All-American baseball team. It has since chosen All-American teams and a player of the year for each division (National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I, Division II, Division III, National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics, junior college and high school).[2]Collegiate Baseball selects All-American, Freshman All-American and High School All-American teams.[3]Baseball America magazine selects pre-season and post-season All-American teams and College Player of the Year honorees.[4][5]

Various organizations selected All-American lists of the best players for the 1993 NCAA Division I college baseball season. The ABCA, the magazine Baseball America, and Collegiate Baseball were the NCAA-sanctioned selectors.[6] This list only includes players selected to the post-season All-American first team for each selector. However, many All-American selections choose second, third, etc. teams from the remaining eligible candidates.

Accomplishments

The 1993 All-American class featured three Major League Baseball All-Stars, one Major League Baseball record holder and three World Series champions. As of 2010Jason Varitek remained active. A total of eight players were selected by all three NCAA-sanctioned selectors: pitchers Dan Choi, and Brian Anderson; catcher Varitek; first baseman Ryan McGuire; second baseman Todd Walker; shortstop Mark Loretta; outfielders Eric Danapilis and Brooks Kieschnick.

Kieschnick was both a 1991 and 1992 selection.[6] He won the 1992 & 1993 Dick Howser Trophy, while Varitek won it in 1994.[7] Varitek was honored by all three selectors in 1992 and 1994 and was player of the year in 1994. Walker, who won the 1993 College World Series Most Outstanding Player,[8] was selected by all three organizations in 1994. Darren Dreifort repeated as a selection from the 1992 team. He won the 1993 Rotary Smith Award and the 1993 Golden Spikes Award, and Varitek won both awards in 1994.[9][10] Both Arizona State and Texas A&M had two players included on the team.

Walker led the National League second basemen in fielding percentage and putouts during the 2002 Major League Baseball season.[11] Loretta was selected for the 2004 MLB All-Star Game. During the 2004 season he led the National League in sacrifice flies and led National League second basemen in assists. Loretta was later selected to the 2006 MLB All-Star Game. During the 2000 season he led National League shortstops in fielding percentage. He accumulated over 1700 career hits and won a Silver Slugger in 2004.[12] Varitek is a three-time MLB All-Star (2003, 2005 & 2008), Gold Glove-winner, Silver Slugger-winner and two-time World Series champion (2004 & 2007).[13] He has called the pitches for a major league record four no-hitters.[14]Paul Lo Duca had the most All-Star game selections of players in the 1993 All-America class with four (2003, 2004, 2005 & 2006). In 2002 and 2003, he led National League catchers in putouts, assists and runners caught stealing. However, in 2004 and 2005 he allowed the most stolen bases and in 2003, 2005 and 2006, he committed the most errors among catchers.[15] In 1998, Brian Anderson led the National League with the fewest bases on balls per 9 innings pitched (1.039), but surrendered the most home runs (39).[16] That season, he was a member of the inaugural Arizona Diamondbacks roster. He was also a member of the Diamondbacks' 2001 World Series Championship team along with 1993 All-American Troy Brohawn.[16][17]

Key

ABCA American Baseball Coaches Association[7]
BA Baseball America[7]
CB Collegiate Baseball[7]
Awarded the Golden Spikes Award, Dick Howser Trophy or Rotary Smith Award as national Player of the Year[7]
Player (X) Denotes the number of times the player had been named an All-American at that point[7]
? Inducted into the National College Baseball Hall of Fame[18]

All-Americans

Below are the Division I players selected to the various NCAA-sanctioned lists.[19] The default list order is arranged by the position numbers used by official baseball scorekeepers (i.e., , , etc.).

Position Name School ABCA BA CB Notes
Pitcher Darren Dreifort (2) ? Wichita State
Green tickY
Green tickY
--
Pitcher Dan Choi Long Beach State
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Pitcher Brian Anderson Wright State
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
2001 World Series champion
Pitcher Jeff Granger Texas A&M
Green tickY
Green tickY
--
Pitcher Scott Christman Oregon State
Green tickY
--
Green tickY
Pitcher John Powell Auburn
--
Green tickY
--
602 career strikeouts (Division I record)[20]
Pitcher Troy Brohawn Nebraska
--
--
Green tickY
2001 World Series champion
Pitcher Thad Chrismon North Carolina
--
--
Green tickY
41 career saves (8th in Division I),[20] 141 games (3rd in Division I)[20]
Pitcher Paul Thornton Georgia Southern
--
--
Green tickY
Catcher Jason Varitek (2) Georgia Tech
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
MLB All-Star (2003, 2005 & 2008), Gold Glove, Silver Slugger, and 2× World Series champion (2004 & 2007)[13] Caught 4 no-hitters[14]
First baseman Ryan McGuire UCLA
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Second baseman Todd Walker ? LSU
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
1993 College World Series Most Outstanding Player[8]
Third baseman Antonio Fernandez New Mexico
Green tickY
--
--
Third baseman Antone Williamson Arizona State
--
Green tickY
--
Third baseman George Arias Arizona
--
--
Green tickY
Shortstop Mark Loretta Northwestern
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
MLB All-Star (2004 & 2006) and Silver Slugger-winner[12]
Outfielder Eric Danapilis Notre Dame
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Outfielder Marc Sagmoen Nebraska
Green tickY
--
Green tickY
.451 career batting average (5th in Division I),.[20] 782 career batting average (20th in Division I)[20]
Outfielder Brian Thomas Texas A&M
Green tickY
--
--
Outfielder Vee Hightower Vanderbilt
--
--
Green tickY
Outfielder Pat Watkins East Carolina
--
Green tickY
--
Utility player Brooks Kieschnick (3) ? Texas
Green tickY
--
Green tickY
Made BA team as OF1993 POY (ABCA, BA, CB)[6] 1992 & 1993 Dick Howser Trophy[7]
Designated hitter Paul LoDuca Arizona State
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
129 hits in a single season (1993) (T-7th in Division I),[20] 4x MLB All-Star (2003, 2004, 2005 & 2006)

See also

References

General
  • "Baseball Award Winners" (PDF). National Collegiate Athletic Association. Retrieved 2010.
Inline citations
  1. ^ The Michigan alumnus. University of Michigan Library. 2010. p. 495. ASIN B0037HO8MY.
  2. ^ "This is the ABCA". American Baseball Coaches Association. September 20, 2007. Archived from the original on April 2, 2010. Retrieved 2010.
  3. ^ "All Americans: Collegiate Baseball Newspaper". Collegiate Baseball Newspaper Inc. Retrieved 2010.
  4. ^ "College: Awards: All-America Teams". Baseball America Inc. Archived from the original on April 23, 2010. Retrieved 2010.
  5. ^ "College: Awards: Player Of The Year". Baseball America Inc. Archived from the original on April 23, 2010. Retrieved 2010.
  6. ^ a b c "Baseball Award Winners" (PDF). National Collegiate Athletic Association. Retrieved 2010.
  7. ^ a b c d e f g "NCAA Baseball Award Winners" (PDF). NCAA. Retrieved 2012.
  8. ^ a b "Most Outstanding Player Award". CWS Omaha, Inc. Retrieved 2010.
  9. ^ "Rotary Smith Award". Baseball Almanac. Retrieved 2010.
  10. ^ "Previous Golden Spikes Award Winners". USA Golden Spikes Award. Archived from the original on September 21, 2010. Retrieved 2010.
  11. ^ "Todd Walker". Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved 2010.
  12. ^ a b "Mark Loretta". Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved 2010.
  13. ^ a b "Jason Varitek". Sports Reference LLC. Archived from the original on May 11, 2010. Retrieved 2010.
  14. ^ a b Kaplan, Thomas (May 21, 2008). "Red Sox' No-Hitter Puts Varitek in Record Books". The New York Times. Retrieved 2010.
  15. ^ "Paul Lo Duca". Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved 2010.
  16. ^ a b "Brian Anderson". Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved 2010.
  17. ^ "Troy Brohawn". Sports Reference LLC. Archived from the original on May 30, 2010. Retrieved 2010.
  18. ^ "College Baseball Hall of Fame Inductees". College Baseball Hall of Fame. Retrieved 2012.
  19. ^ "Baseball Award Winners" (PDF). National Collegiate Athletic Association. Retrieved 2010.
  20. ^ a b c d e f "Division I Record Book" (PDF). NCAA. Retrieved 2012.



  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

1993_College_Baseball_All-America_Team
 



 



 
Music Scenes