2010 United States House of Representatives Elections in South Carolina
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2010 United States House of Representatives Elections in South Carolina
2010 United States House of Representatives elections in South Carolina

← 2008 November 2, 2010 (2010-11-02) 2012 →

All 6 South Carolina seats to the United States House of Representatives
  Majority party Minority party
 
Party Republican Democratic
Last election 4 2
Seats won 5 1
Seat change Increase1 Decrease1
Popular vote 753,932 543,921
Percentage 56.21% 40.55%
Swing Increase6.06% Decrease8.52%

2010 House South Carolina.svg
2010 election results by district
  Democratic hold
  Republican hold
  Republican gain

The 2010 United States House of Representatives elections in South Carolina were held on Tuesday, November 2, 2010. The primary elections were held on June 8. The composition of the state delegation before the election was four Republicans and two Democrats.

After the general election, the composition of the state delegation entering the 112th Congress was five Republicans and just one Democrat.

All seats were rated safe for their incumbent parties except for district 5.

Overview

United States House of Representatives elections in South Carolina, 2010[1]
Party Votes Percentage Seats Before Seats After +/-
Republican 753,932 56.21% 4 5 +1
Democratic 543,921 40.55% 2 1 -1
Constitution 16,597 1.23% 0 0 0
Libertarian 9,988 0.74% 0 0 0
Green 7,322 0.65% 0 0 0
Other 9,376 0.74% 0 0 0
Totals 1,341,136 100.00% 6 6 --

By district

Results of the 2010 United States House of Representatives elections in South Carolina by district:[2]

District Republican Democratic Others Total Result
Votes % Votes % Votes % Votes %
District 1 152,755 65.37% 67,008 28.67% 13,932 5.96% 233,695 100.00% Republican Hold
District 2 138,861 53.47% 113,625 43.76% 7,186 2.77% 259,672 100.00% Republican Hold
District 3 126,235 62.46% 66,497 32.90% 9,376 4.64% 202,108 100.00% Republican Hold
District 4 137,586 63.45% 62,438 28.80% 16,814 7.75% 216,838 100.00% Republican Hold
District 5 125,834 55.12% 102,296 44.81% 156 0.07% 228,286 100.00% Republican Gain
District 6 72,661 36.40% 125,459 62.86% 1,470 0.74% 199,590 100.00% Democratic Hold
Total 753,932 56.26% 537,323 40.09% 48,934 3.65% 1,340,189 100.00% .
South Carolina's 6 congressional districts

District 1

United States House of Representatives, South Carolina District 1 map.png

Incumbent Republican Congressman Henry E. Brown Jr. has been in office since 2002 and is retiring. The open seat was contested by Democrat Ben Frasier, Republican Tim Scott, Green Robert Dobbs, Libertarian Keith Blandford, Working Families Rob Groce, United Citizens Milton Elmer "Mac" McCullough Jr. and Independence Party Jimmy Wood. Scott defeated Paul Thurmond in the primary runoff election.[3]

South Carolina's 1st congressional district election, 2010[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Tim Scott 152,755 65.37
Democratic Ben Frasier 67,008 28.67
Working Families Rob Groce 4,148 1.77
Green Robert Dobbs 3,369 1.44
Libertarian Keith Blandford 2,750 1.18
Independence Jimmy Wood 2,489 1.07
United Citizens Milton Elmer "Mac" McCullough Jr. 1,013 0.43
Write-ins 163 0.07
Total votes 233,695 100.00
Republican hold

District 2

United States House of Representatives, South Carolina District 2 map.png

Incumbent Republican Congressman Joe Wilson has been in office since 2001. Wilson defeated Democratic nominee Iraq War Veteran Rob Miller, Libertarian Eddie McCain, and the Constitution Party's Marc Beaman.[5]

South Carolina's 2nd congressional district election, 2010[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Joe Wilson (inc.) 138,861 53.48
Democratic Rob Miller 113,625 43.76
Libertarian Eddie McCain 4,228 1.63
Constitution Marc Beaman 2,856 1.10
Write-ins 102 0.04
Total votes 259,672 100.00
Republican hold

District 3

United States House of Representatives, South Carolina District 3 map.png

Incumbent Republican Congressman J. Gresham Barrett had been in office since 2003, but decided to retire to run for Governor. The open seat was contested by Republican nominee Jeff Duncan, Democratic / Working Families nominee Jane Ballard Dyer, and Constitution Party nominee John Dalen. Duncan had come in second in the Republican Primary at 25%, but beat Richard Cash in the runoff 51% to 49%.[6]

South Carolina's 3rd congressional district election, 2010[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jeff Duncan 126,235 62.46
Democratic Jane Ballard Dyer 73,095 36.16
Constitution John Dalen 2,682 1.33
Write-ins 96 0.05
Total votes 202,108 100.00
Republican hold

District 4

United States House of Representatives, South Carolina District 4 map.png

This was an open seat. Incumbent Republican Congressman Bob Inglis had been in office since 2005, but lost to Trey Gowdy in the primary election. Trey Gowdy would go on to defeat the Democratic nominee Paul Corden, Green Party's Faye Walters, Libertarian Rick Mahler, and the Constitution Party's Dave Edwards.

South Carolina's 4th congressional district election, 2010[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Trey Gowdy 137,586 63.45
Democratic Paul Corden 62,438 28.79
Constitution Dave Edwards 11,059 5.10
Libertarian Rick Mahler 3,010 1.39
Green Faye Walters 2,564 1.18
Write-ins 181 0.08
Total votes 216,838 100.00
Republican hold

District 5

United States House of Representatives, South Carolina District 5 map.png

Democratic incumbent John M. Spratt Jr. was defeated by Republican Mick Mulvaney.

South Carolina's 5th congressional district election, 2010[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Mick Mulvaney 125,834 55.12
Democratic John M. Spratt Jr. (inc.) 102,296 44.81
Write-ins 156 0.07
Total votes 228,286 100.00
Republican gain from Democratic

District 6

United States House of Representatives, South Carolina District 6 map.png

Incumbent Democratic Congressman Jim Clyburn has been in office since 1993. Clyburn won re-election against Republican Jim Pratt and Nammu Y Muhammad of the Green Party.

South Carolina's 6th congressional district election, 2010[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jim Clyburn (inc.) 125,459 62.86
Republican Jim Pratt 72,661 36.41
Green Nammu Y. Muhammad 1,389 0.70
Write-ins 81 0.04
Total votes 199,590 100.00
Democratic hold

See also

References

  1. ^ "Statewide Results : 2010 General Election : Results by County". Enr-scvotes.org. Retrieved .
  2. ^ Haas, Karen L. (June 3, 2011). "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 2, 2010". Clerk of the U.S. House of Representatives. Retrieved 2019.
  3. ^ Kiely, Kathy. Tim Scott wins nomination to become first black Republican congressman since 2003, USA Today, June 22, 2010.
  4. ^ a b c d e f "Election Results : 2012 General Election : South Carolina State Election Commission". Scvotes.org. Archived from the original on 2014-10-20. Retrieved .
  5. ^ "Official candidate list" (PDF). SC Secretary of State. Retrieved .
  6. ^ Barone, Michael (2011). The Almanac of American Politics 2012. Washington, D.C.: National Journal Group. pp. 1453-1455. ISBN 978-0-226-03808-7. LCCN 2011929193.

External links


Preceded by
2008 elections
United States House elections in South Carolina
2010
Succeeded by
2012 elections

  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

2010_United_States_House_of_Representatives_elections_in_South_Carolina
 



 



 
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