2020 United States Presidential Election
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2020 United States Presidential Election

2020 United States presidential election

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538 members of the Electoral College
270 electoral votes needed to win
Opinion polls

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About this image
The electoral map for the 2020 election, based on populations from the 2010 Census.

Incumbent President

Donald Trump
Republican



The 2020 United States presidential election, scheduled for Tuesday, November 3, 2020, will be the 59th quadrennial U.S. presidential election. Voters will select presidential electors who in turn on December 14, 2020,[1] will either elect a new president and vice president or re-elect the incumbents. The series of presidential primary elections and caucuses is likely to be held during the first six months of 2020. This nominating process is also an indirect election, where voters cast ballots selecting a slate of delegates to a political party's nominating convention, who then in turn elect their party's nominee (and running mate).

Donald Trump, the 45th and incumbent president, has launched a reelection campaign for the Republican primaries; several state Republican Party organizations have cancelled their primaries in a show of support for his candidacy.[2] 27 major candidates launched campaigns for the Democratic nomination, which became the largest field of candidates for any political party in the post-reform period of American politics. The winner of the 2020 presidential election is scheduled to be inaugurated on January 20, 2021.

Background

Procedure

Article Two of the United States Constitution states that for a person to serve as president the individual must be a natural-born citizen of the United States, at least 35 years old and a United States resident for at least 14 years. Candidates for the presidency typically seek the nomination of one of the various political parties of the United States, in which case each party develops a method (such as a primary election) to choose the candidate the party deems best suited to run for the position. The primary elections are usually indirect elections where voters cast ballots for a slate of party delegates pledged to a particular candidate. The party's delegates then officially nominate a candidate to run on the party's behalf. The presidential nominee typically chooses a vice presidential running mate to form that party's ticket, who is then ratified by the delegates (with the exception of the Libertarian Party, which nominates its vice presidential candidate by delegate vote regardless of the presidential nominee's preference). The general election in November is also an indirect election, in which voters cast ballots for a slate of members of the Electoral College; these electors then directly elect the president and vice president.[3] If no candidate receives the minimum 270 electoral votes needed to win the election, the United States House of Representatives will select the president from the three candidates who received the most electoral votes, and the United States Senate will select the vice president from the candidates who received the two highest totals.

In August 2018, the Democratic National Committee voted to disallow superdelegates from voting on the first ballot of the nominating process, beginning with the 2020 election. This would require a candidate to win a majority of pledged delegates from the assorted primary elections in order to win the party's nomination. The last time this did not occur was the nomination of Adlai Stevenson II at the 1952 Democratic National Convention.[4]

Several Republican state committees are reportedly contemplating scrapping their 2020 primary/caucus, while others have already preemptively done so.[5] They have cited the fact that Republicans canceled several state primaries when George H.W. Bush and George W. Bush sought a second term in 1992 and 2004, respectively; and Democrats scrapped some of their primaries when Bill Clinton and Barack Obama were seeking reelection in 1996 and 2012, respectively.[6][7]

On August 26, 2019, the Maine legislature passed a bill adopting ranked-choice voting both for presidential primaries and for the general election.[8][9] On September 6, 2019, Governor Janet Mills allowed the bill to become law without her signature, which delayed it from taking effect until after the 2020 Democratic primary in March, but puts Maine on track to be the first state to use ranked-choice voting for a presidential general election.[10] The law continues the use of the congressional district method for the allocation of electors, as Maine and Nebraska have used in recent elections. The change could potentially prevent the projection of the winner(s) of Maine's electoral votes for over a week after election day, and will also complicate interpretation of the national popular vote.

The Twenty-second Amendment to the Constitution states that an individual cannot be elected to the presidency more than twice. This prohibits former presidents Bill Clinton, George W. Bush, and Barack Obama from being elected president again. Former president Jimmy Carter, having served only a single term as president, is not constitutionally prohibited from being elected to another term in the 2020 election, though he has no plans to do so saying, "95 is out of the question. I'm having a hard time walking. I think the time has passed for me to be involved actively in politics, much less run for president."[11]

On October 31, 2019, the House of Representatives voted procedures governing public hearings regarding a possible impeachment of President Trump. These are scheduled to take place starting mid-November 2019.[12] If the House votes to impeach the president, a possible trial in Senate held during the primary season would affect those senators running for the Democratic nomination, since they would be called to attend the trial instead of stumping on the campaign trail.[13]

Demographic trends

The age group of what will then be people in the 18 to 45-year-old bracket is expected to represent just under 40 percent of the United States' eligible voters in 2020. It is expected that more than 30 percent of eligible American voters will be nonwhite.[14]

A bipartisan report indicates that changes in voter demographics since the 2016 election could impact the results of the 2020 election. African Americans, Hispanics, Asians, and other ethnic minorities, as well as "whites with a college degree", are expected to all increase their percentage of national eligible voters by 2020, while "whites without a college degree" will decrease. This shift is potentially an advantage for the Democratic nominee; however, due to geographical differences, this could still lead to President Trump (or a different Republican nominee) winning the Electoral College while still losing the popular vote, possibly by an even larger margin than in 2016.[15]

Simultaneous elections

The presidential election will occur simultaneously with elections to the Senate and the House of Representatives. Several states will also hold state gubernatorial and state legislative elections. Following the election, the United States House will redistribute the seats among the 50 states based on the results of the 2020 United States Census, and the states will conduct a redistricting of Congressional and state legislative districts. In most states the governor and the state legislature conduct the redistricting (although some states have redistricting commissions), and often a party that wins a presidential election experiences a coattail effect which also helps other candidates of that party win elections.[16] Therefore, the party that wins the 2020 presidential election could also win a significant advantage in the drawing of new Congressional and state legislative districts that would stay in effect until the 2032 elections.[17]

Nominations

Republican Party

Donald Trump is formally seeking re-election.[18][19]His re-election campaign has been ongoing since his victory in 2016, leading pundits to describe his tactic of holding rallies continuously throughout his presidency as a "never-ending campaign".[20] On January 20, 2017, at 5:11 p.m., he submitted a letter as a substitute of FEC Form 2, by which he reached the legal threshold for filing, in compliance with the Federal Election Campaign Act.[21]

Beginning in August 2017, reports arose that members of the Republican Party were preparing a "shadow campaign" against Trump, particularly from the moderate or establishment wings of the party. Then-Arizona senator John McCain said, "[Republicans] see weakness in this president."[22]Maine senator Susan Collins, Kentucky senator Rand Paul, and former New Jersey governor Chris Christie all expressed doubts in 2017 that Trump would be the 2020 nominee, with Collins stating "it's too difficult to say."[23][24] Senator Jeff Flake claimed in 2017 that Trump was "inviting" a primary challenger by the way he was governing.[25] Longtime political strategist Roger Stone, however, predicted in May 2018 that Trump might not seek a second term were he to succeed in keeping all his campaign promises and "mak[ing] America great again".[26]

The Republican National Committee unofficially endorsed Trump on January 25, 2019.[27]

Former Massachusetts governor Bill Weld became Trump's first official challenger in the Republican primaries following an announcement on April 15, 2019.[28] Weld, who was the Libertarian Party's nominee for vice president in 2016, is considered a long shot because his libertarian views on several political positions such as abortion rights, gay marriage and marijuana legalization conflict with traditionalist conservative positions.[29] Former Illinois representative Joe Walsh launched the second primary challenge on August 25, 2019, saying, "I'm going to do whatever I can. I don't want [Trump] to win. The country cannot afford to have him win. If I'm not successful, I'm not voting for him."[30] On September 8, 2019, former South Carolina governor and representative Mark Sanford officially announced that he will be the third major Republican primary challenger to Trump,[31] though he dropped out of the race on November 12.[32]

Declared major candidates

Name Born Experience Home state Campaign
Announcement date
Donald Trump official portrait (cropped).jpg
Donald Trump
June 14, 1946
(age 73)
Queens, New York
President of the United States (2017-present)
Businessman, television personality, real estate developer
Flag of Florida.svg
Florida[33]
TrumpPenceKAG.png
Campaign
Campaign (informal): February 17, 2017
Campaign (official): June 18, 2019

FEC filing[34]
Rep Joe Walsh.jpg
Joe Walsh
December 27, 1961
(age 57)
North Barrington, Illinois
U.S. representative from IL-08 (2011-2013)
Conservative talk radio host
Flag of Illinois.svg
Illinois
Joe Walsh 2020 Logo-black.svg
Campaign
Campaign: August 25, 2019
FEC filing[35]
Bill Weld campaign portrait.jpg
Bill Weld
July 31, 1945
(age 74)
Smithtown, New York
Governor of Massachusetts (1991-1997)
Libertarian nominee for Vice President in 2016
Republican nominee for U.S. Senate from Massachusetts in 1996
Flag of Massachusetts.svg
Massachusetts
Bill Weld campaign 2020.png
Campaign
Exploratory committee: February 15, 2019
Campaign: April 15, 2019

FEC filing[36]

Withdrawn candidate

Candidate Born Experience State Campaign
announced
Campaign
suspended
Article Ref.
Mark Sanford, Official Portrait, 113th Congress (cropped).jpg
Mark Sanford
May 28, 1960
(age 59)
Fort Lauderdale, Florida
U.S. representative from SC-01 (1995-2001, 2013-2019)
Governor of South Carolina (2003-2011)
Flag of South Carolina.svg
South Carolina
Mark Sanford 2020.png
Campaign: September 8, 2019[31]
FEC filing[37]
November 12, 2019 Campaign [38]


Endorsements

Democratic Party

After Hillary Clinton's loss in the previous election, the Democratic Party was seen largely as leaderless[39] and fractured between the centrist Clinton wing and the more progressive Sanders wing of the party, echoing the rift brought up in the 2016 primary election.[40][41]

This divide between the establishment and progressive wings of the party has been reflected in several elections leading up to the 2020 primaries, most notably in 2017 with the election for DNC chair between Biden-backed moderate Tom Perez and Sanders-backed progressive Keith Ellison:[42] Perez was elected chairman, but Ellison was appointed the deputy chair, a largely ceremonial role. In 2018, several U.S. House districts that Democrats hoped to gain from the Republican majority had contentious primary elections. These clashes were described by Politicos Elena Schneider as a "Democratic civil war."[43] Meanwhile, there has been a general shift to the left in regards to college tuition, healthcare, and immigration among Democrats in the Senate, likely to build up credentials for the upcoming primary election.[44][45]

Perez has commented that the 2020 primary field would likely go into double digits, rivaling the size of the 2016 GOP primary, which consisted of 17 major candidates, setting a then-record for the largest presidential primary field for any political party in American history.[46][47] Several female candidates are expected to enter the race, increasing the likelihood of the Democrats nominating a woman for the second time in a row.[48] Speculation also mounted that Democrats' best bet to defeat President Trump would be to nominate their own celebrity or businessperson with no government experience, most notably Oprah Winfrey after her speech at the 75th Golden Globe Awards.[49]

The topic of age has been brought up among the most likely front-runners: former vice president Joe Biden, Massachusetts senator Elizabeth Warren, and Vermont senator Bernie Sanders, who will be 78, 71, and 79 respectively on inauguration day. Former Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid described the trio as "an old folks' home", expressing a need for fresh faces to step up and lead the party.[50]

There are 18 major candidates running active campaigns as of November 15, 2019. Counting the candidates who have dropped out, 28 major candidates have sought the 2020 Democratic nomination, breaking the aforementioned 2016 GOP primary's record for the largest presidential primary field for any political party since 1972.[51][47]

Declared major candidates

Name Born Experience Home state Campaign
Announcement date
Ref.
Michael Bennet by Gage Skidmore.jpg
Michael Bennet
November 28, 1964
(age 54)
New Delhi, India
U.S. senator from Colorado (2009-present) Flag of Colorado.svg
Colorado
Michael Bennet 2020 presidential campaign logo.svg
Campaign
Campaign: May 2, 2019
FEC filing[52]
[53]

Joe Biden
November 20, 1942
(age 76)
Scranton, Pennsylvania
Vice President of the United States (2009-2017)
U.S. senator from Delaware (1973-2009)
Candidate for President in 1988 and 2008
Flag of Delaware.svg
Delaware
Joe Biden 2020 presidential campaign logo.svg
Campaign
Campaign: April 25, 2019
FEC filing[54]
[55]
Cory Booker by Gage Skidmore.jpg
Cory Booker
April 27, 1969
(age 50)
Washington, D.C.
U.S. senator from New Jersey (2013-present)
Mayor of Newark, New Jersey (2006-2013)
Flag of New Jersey.svg
New Jersey
Cory Booker 2020 Logo.svg
Campaign
Campaign: February 1, 2019
FEC filing[56]
[57]
Steve Bullock by Gage Skidmore.jpg
Steve Bullock
April 11, 1966
(age 53)
Missoula, Montana
Governor of Montana (2013-present)
Attorney General of Montana (2009-2013)
Flag of Montana.svg
Montana
Steve Bullock 2020 presidential campaign logo.svg
Campaign
Campaign: May 14, 2019
FEC filing[58]
[59][60]
Pete Buttigieg by Gage Skidmore.jpg
Pete Buttigieg
January 19, 1982
(age 37)
South Bend, Indiana
Mayor of South Bend, Indiana (2012-present) Flag of Indiana.svg
Indiana
Pete for America logo (Strato Blue).svg
Campaign
Exploratory committee: January 23, 2019
Campaign: April 14, 2019

FEC filing[61]
[62]
Julian Castro 2019 crop.jpg
Julián Castro
September 16, 1974
(age 45)
San Antonio, Texas
Secretary of Housing and Urban Development (2014-2017)
Mayor of San Antonio, Texas (2009-2014)
Flag of Texas.svg
Texas
Julian Castro 2020 presidential campaign logo.svg
Campaign
Exploratory committee:
December 12, 2018
Campaign: January 12, 2019

FEC filing[63]
[64]
John Delaney 2019 crop.jpg
John Delaney
April 16, 1963
(age 56)
Wood-Ridge, New Jersey
U.S. representative from MD-06 (2013-2019) Flag of Maryland.svg
Maryland
John Delaney 2020 logo.svg
Campaign
Campaign: July 28, 2017
FEC filing[65]
[66]
Tulsi Gabbard August 2019.jpg
Tulsi Gabbard
April 12, 1981
(age 38)
Leloaloa, American Samoa
U.S. representative from HI-02 (2013-present) Flag of Hawaii.svg
Hawaii
Tulsi Gabbard 2020 presidential campaign logo black.svg
Campaign
Campaign: January 11, 2019
FEC filing[67]
[68]
Kamala Harris April 2019.jpg
Kamala Harris
October 20, 1964
(age 55)
Oakland, California
U.S. senator from California (2017-present)
Attorney General of California (2011-2017)
Flag of California.svg
California
Kamala Harris 2020 presidential campaign logo.svg
Campaign
Campaign: January 21, 2019
FEC filing[69]
[70]
Amy Klobuchar 2019 (cropped).jpg
Amy Klobuchar
May 25, 1960
(age 59)
Plymouth, Minnesota
U.S. senator from Minnesota (2007-present) Flag of Minnesota.svg
Minnesota
Amy Klobuchar 2020 presidential campaign logo.svg
Campaign
Campaign: February 10, 2019
FEC filing[71]
[72]
Wayne Messam by Marc Nozell (cropped).jpg
Wayne Messam
June 7, 1974
(age 45)
South Bay, Florida
Mayor of Miramar, Florida (2015-present) Flag of Florida.svg
Florida
Wayne Messam 2020 presidential campaign logo.png
Campaign
Exploratory committee:
March 13, 2019
Campaign: March 28, 2019

FEC filing[73]
[74]
Deval Patrick 2016.jpg
Deval Patrick
July 31, 1956
(age 63)
Chicago, Illinois
Governor of Massachusetts (2007-2015) Flag of Massachusetts.svg
Massachusetts
Devallogo2020.png
Campaign: November 14, 2019
FEC filing[75]
[76]
Bernie Sanders July 2019 (cropped).jpg
Bernie Sanders
September 8, 1941
(age 78)
Brooklyn, New York
U.S. senator from Vermont (2007-present)
U.S. representative from VT-AL (1991-2007)
Mayor of Burlington, Vermont (1981-1989)
Candidate for President in 2016
Flag of Vermont.svg
Vermont
Bernie Sanders 2020 logo.svg
Campaign
Campaign: February 19, 2019
FEC filing[77]
[78]
Joe Sestak (48641414726) (cropped).jpg
Joe Sestak
December 12, 1951
(age 67)
Secane, Pennsylvania
U.S. representative from PA-07 (2007-2011) Flag of Virginia.svg
Virginia

Campaign
Campaign: June 22, 2019
FEC filing[79]
[80]
Tom Steyer by Gage Skidmore.jpg
Tom Steyer
June 27, 1957
(age 62)
Manhattan, New York
Hedge fund manager
Founder of Farallon Capital
Flag of California.svg
California
Tom Steyer 2020 logo (black text).svg
Campaign
Campaign: July 9, 2019
FEC filing[81]
[82]
Elizabeth Warren by Gage Skidmore.jpg
Elizabeth Warren
June 22, 1949
(age 70)
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
U.S. senator from Massachusetts (2013-present)
Special Advisor for the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (2010-2011)
Flag of Massachusetts.svg
Massachusetts
Elizabeth Warren 2020 presidential campaign logo.svg
Campaign
Exploratory committee:
December 31, 2018
Campaign: February 9, 2019

FEC filing[83]
[84]
Marianne Williamson (48541662667) (cropped).jpg
Marianne Williamson
July 8, 1952
(age 67)
Houston, Texas
Author
Founder of Project Angel Food
Independent candidate for U.S. House from CA-33 in 2014
Flag of Iowa.svg
Iowa
Marianne Williamson 2020 presidential campaign logo.svg
Campaign
Exploratory committee:
November 15, 2018
Campaign: January 28, 2019

FEC filing[85]
[86]
Andrew Yang by Gage Skidmore.jpg
Andrew Yang
January 13, 1975
(age 44)
Schenectady, New York
Entrepreneur
Founder of Venture for America
Flag of New York.svg
New York
Andrew Yang 2020 logo.png
Campaign
Campaign: November 6, 2017
FEC filing[87]
[88]

Withdrawn candidates

Candidate Born Experience State Campaign
announced
Campaign
suspended
Article Ref.
MAJ Richard Ojeda.jpg
Richard Ojeda
September 25, 1970
(age 48)
Rochester, Minnesota
West Virginia state senator from WV-SD07 (2016-2019) Flag of West Virginia.svg
West Virginia
November 11, 2018 January 25, 2019

Campaign
FEC filing[89]

[90][91]
Eric Swalwell (48016282941) (cropped).jpg
Eric Swalwell
November 16, 1980
(age 38)
Sac City, Iowa
U.S. representative from CA-15 (2013-present) Flag of California.svg
California
April 8, 2019 July 8, 2019
(running for re-election)
Eric Swalwell 2020 presidential campaign logo.svg
Campaign
FEC filing[92]
[93][94]

Mike Gravel
May 13, 1930
(age 89)
Springfield, Massachusetts
U.S. senator from Alaska (1969-1981)
Candidate for President in 2008
Flag of California.svg
California
April 2, 2019
Exploratory committee: March 19, 2019-
April 1, 2019
August 6, 2019
(co-endorsed Sanders and Gabbard)[95]
Gravel Mg web logo line two color.svg
Campaign
FEC filing[96]
[97][95]
John Hickenlooper by Gage Skidmore.jpg
John Hickenlooper
February 7, 1952
(age 67)
Narberth, Pennsylvania
Governor of Colorado (2011-2019)
Mayor of Denver, Colorado (2003-2011)
Flag of Colorado.svg
Colorado
March 4, 2019 August 15, 2019
(running for U.S. Senate)[98]
John Hickenlooper 2020 presidential campaign logo.png
Campaign
FEC filing[99]
[100][101]
Jay Inslee by Gage Skidmore.jpg
Jay Inslee
February 9, 1951
(age 68)
Seattle, Washington
Governor of Washington (2013-present)
U.S. representative from WA-01 (1999-2012)
Flag of Washington.svg
Washington
March 1, 2019 August 21, 2019
(running for re-election)[102]

Campaign
FEC filing[103]
[104][105]
Seth Moulton August 2019.jpg
Seth Moulton
October 24, 1978
(age 40)
Salem, Massachusetts
U.S. representative from MA-06 (2015-present) Flag of Massachusetts.svg
Massachusetts
April 22, 2019 August 23, 2019
(running for re-election)[106]

Campaign
FEC filing[107]
[108][109]
Kirsten Gillibrand August 2019.jpg
Kirsten Gillibrand
December 9, 1966
(age 52)
Albany, New York
U.S. senator from New York (2009-present)
U.S. representative from NY-20 (2007-2009)
Flag of New York.svg
New York
March 17, 2019
Exploratory committee: January 15, 2019-
March 16, 2019
August 28, 2019 Gillibrand 2020 logo.png
Campaign
FEC filing[110]
[111][112]
Bill de Blasio by Gage Skidmore.jpg
Bill de Blasio
May 8, 1961
(age 58)
Manhattan, New York
Mayor of New York City, New York (2014-present) Flag of New York.svg
New York
May 16, 2019 September 20, 2019 Bill de Blasio 2020 presidential campaign logo.svg
Campaign
FEC filing[113]
[114][115]
Tim Ryan (48639153698) (cropped).jpg
Tim Ryan
July 16, 1973
(age 46)
Niles, Ohio
U.S. representative from OH-13 (2013-present)
U.S. representative from OH-17 (2003-2013)
Flag of Ohio.svg
Ohio
April 4, 2019 October 24, 2019
(running for re-election,[116] endorsed Biden)[117]

Timryan2020.png
Campaign
FEC filing[118]

[119][120]
Beto O'Rourke April 2019.jpg
Beto O'Rourke
September 26, 1972
(age 47)
El Paso, Texas
U.S. representative from TX-16 (2013-2019) Flag of Texas.svg
Texas
March 14, 2019 November 1, 2019 Beto O'Rourke 2020 presidential campaign logo.svg
Campaign

FEC filing[121]

[122][123]

Individuals who have publicly expressed interest

Endorsements

Libertarian Party

Libertarian debates are being held at multiple state conventions,[130] as well as bi-weekly on the We Are Libertarians podcast.

Declared candidates

Name Born Experience Home state Campaign
Announcement date
Ref.
Max suit small.jpg
Max Abramson
April 29, 1976
(age 43)
Kent, Washington
New Hampshire state representative from NH-20 (2014-2016 and 2018-present)
Libertarian nominee for Governor of New Hampshire in 2016
Flag of New Hampshire.svg
New Hampshire
Max Abramson 2020 logo.png
June 30, 2019
FEC Filing[131]
[132]
Gray - replace this image male.svg
Ken Armstrong
April 25, 1957
(age 62)
Pasadena, California
U.S. Coast Guard commissioned officer, 1977-1994
Former nonprofit executive
Former Honolulu County, Hawaii elected official
Flag of Hawaii.svg
Hawaii

May 10, 2019
FEC Filing[133]
[134]
Dan Taxation Is Theft Behrman for President 2020.jpg
Dan Behrman
April 24, 1981
(age 38)
Los Angeles, California
Software engineer, internet personality and podcaster
Nominee for Texas state representative from TX-125 in 2014
Flag of Texas.svg
Texas
Dan "Taxation is Theft" Behrman 2020.png
January 30, 2019
FEC Filing[135]
[136]
Gray - replace this image male.svg
Dan Christmann
September 13, 1982
(age 37)
Vice-Chair of the Brooklyn Libertarian Party (2019--present)
Candidate for New York City Public Advocate in 2019
Flag of New York.svg
New York
Daniel Christmann 2020 logo.jpg
October 30, 2019
FEC Filing[137]
[138]
Gray - replace this image female.svg
Souraya Faas
December 19, 1981
(age 37)
Miami, Florida
Former member of the Miami-Dade County Republican Executive Committee
Republican candidate for U.S. representative from FL-26 in 2018
Independent candidate for President in 2016
Flag of Florida.svg
Florida
May 3, 2019
FEC Filing[139]
[140]
Gray - replace this image male.svg
Jedi Hill
Author October 7, 2019
FEC Filing[141]
[142]
Gray - replace this image female.svg
Jo Jorgensen
May 1, 1957
(age 62)
Libertyville, Illinois
Psychology Senior Lecturer at Clemson University
Nominee for Vice President in 1996
Flag of South Carolina.svg
South Carolina

August 13, 2019
FEC Filing[143]
[144]
Kokesh2013.jpg
Adam Kokesh
February 1, 1982
(age 37)
San Francisco, California
Libertarian and anti-war political activist
Candidate for U.S. Senate from Arizona in 2018
Republican candidate for U.S. representative from NM-03 in 2010
Flag of Arizona.svg
Arizona
AdamKokesh2020CampaignLogo.png
July 18, 2013
FEC Filing[145]
[146]
John McAfee by Gage Skidmore.jpg
John McAfee
September 18, 1945
(age 74)
Forest of Dean, Gloucestershire,
United Kingdom
Founder and CEO of McAfee, Inc. 1987-1994
Candidate for President in 2016
Flag of Tennessee.svg
Tennessee
McAfee 2020 logo.png
Campaign
June 3, 2018
[147][148]
Sam Robb Campaign Photo for 2020 Election.jpg

Sam Robb

January 2, 1969
(age 50)
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Software Engineer
Former Naval Officer
Author
Flag of Pennsylvania.svg

Pennsylvania

Sam Robb Campaign Logo for 2020 candidacy.png

April 1, 2019
FEC Filing[149]

[142][150]
Gray - replace this image female.svg
Kim Ruff
Peoria, Arizona Vice chair of the LP Radical Caucus
Write-in candidate for Arizona State Mine Inspector in 2018
Flag of Arizona.svg
Arizona
RuffPhillips 2020 campaign logo.png
March 25, 2019
FEC Filing[151]
[152]
Vermin Supreme August 2019.jpg
Vermin Supreme
June 1961
(age 57)
Rockport, Massachusetts
Performance artist and activist
Candidate for President in 1992, 1996, 2000, 2004, 2008, 2012, and 2016
Candidate for Mayor of Detroit, Michigan in 1989
Candidate for Mayor of Baltimore, Maryland in 1987
Flag of Kansas.svg
Kansas
Vermin Supreme A Dictator You Can Trust.svg
May 28, 2018
FEC Filing[153]
[154]
Arvin Vohra on The Tatiana Show.jpg
Arvin Vohra
May 9, 1979
(age 40)
Silver Spring, Maryland
Vice Chair of the LNC 2014-2018
Nominee for U.S. Senate from Maryland in 2016 and 2018
Nominee for U.S. representative from Maryland in 2012 and 2014
Flag of Maryland.svg
Maryland
Arvin Vohra 2020 logo.png
July 3, 2018
FEC Filing[155]
[156]

Withdrawn candidates

Name Born Experience Home state Campaign Ref.
Zoltan Istvan public profile photo (cropped).jpg
Zoltan Istvan
March 30, 1973
(aged 45)
Los Angeles, California
Transhumanist activist and futurist
Transhumanist nominee for President in 2016
Candidate for Governor of California in 2018
Flag of California.svg
California
Announced campaign:
November 25, 2017

Suspended campaign:
January 11, 2019 (publicly revealed)

[157][158]
Gray - replace this image male.svg
Christopher Marks
Columbia City, Indiana Lawyer and technician Flag of Indiana.svg
Indiana
Announced campaign:
February 7, 2017

Suspended campaign:
August 8, 2019

[159]

Publicly expressed interest

Individuals in this section have expressed an interest in running for president within the last six months.

Endorsements

Adam Kokesh
Federal legislators
Kim Ruff
State legislators
Individuals

Green Party

On July 24, 2019, the Green Party of the United States officially recognized the campaign of Howie Hawkins.[166] On August 26, 2019, Dario Hunter's campaign was also recognized.[167] The remaining candidates may obtain formal recognition after meeting the established criteria by the party's Presidential Campaign Support Committee.[168]

On October 26, 2019, Hawkins was nominated by Socialist Party USA, in addition to seeking the Green nomination.[169]

Declared candidates

Name Born Experience Home state Campaign
Announcement date
Ref.
Candidates formally recognized by GPUS
Hawkins 2010.jpg
Howie Hawkins
December 8, 1952
(age 66)
San Francisco, California
Activist; co-founder of the Green Party
Socialist Party nominee for the 2020 presidential election[170]
Green nominee for Governor of New York in 2010, 2014, 2018
Green nominee for U.S. representative from NY-25 in 2008
Green nominee for U.S. Senate from New York in 2006
Flag of New York.svg
New York
Howie Hawkins 2020 presidential campaign logo.png
Campaign
Exploratory committee:
April 3, 2019

Campaign: May 28, 2019
FEC filing[171]
[172][173][174]
Dario Hunter YCSD (cropped) (cropped).jpg
Dario Hunter
April 21, 1983
(age 36)
Livingston, New Jersey
Youngstown Board of Education member (2016-present) Flag of Ohio.svg
Ohio
Dario Hunter 2020 presidential campaign logo.png
Exploratory committee:
January 21, 2019

Campaign: February 18, 2019
FEC filing[175]
[176]
Other candidates
Gray - replace this image male.svg
Roland G. Aranjo
September 15, 1961
(age 58)
Denver, Colorado
Author
Democratic candidate for President in 2008
Flag of Arizona.svg
Arizona
Campaign March 19, 2019
FEC filing[177]
[178]
Sedinam Curry (cropped).png
Sedinam Moyowasifza-Curry
January 1, 1962
(age 57)
Los Angeles, California[179]
Activist
Green candidate for President in 2016
Flag of California.svg
California
Campaign: July 29, 2015
FEC filing[180]
[181]
Gray - replace this image male.svg
Dennis Lambert
March 1, 1974
(age 45)
Columbus, Ohio[182]
Documentary filmmaker
Green candidate for U.S. representative from OH-15 in 2016
Green nominee for U.S. representative from OH-06 in 2014
Flag of Ohio.svg
Ohio
Campaign: May 10, 2019
FEC filing[183]
[184][185]
David Rolde (Green Party US).jpg
David Rolde
September 13, 1967
(age 52)
Activist Flag of Massachusetts.svg
Massachusetts
Campaign: July 14, 2019
FEC filing[186]
[187]
Gray - replace this image male.svg
Chad Wilson
Activist Flag of Tennessee.svg
Tennessee
Campaign: June 8, 2019
Has not filed with the FEC
[188]

Withdrawn candidates

Name Born Experience Home state Campaign Ref.
Gary swing.jpg
Gary Swing
January 30, 1968
(age 50)
Willingboro Township, New Jersey
Event promoter
Green nominee for U.S. representative from AZ-07 in 2018
Green candidate for U.S. representative from CO-03 in 2018
Green nominee for U.S. Senate from Arizona in 2016
Green nominee for U.S. representative from CO-06 in 2014
Green nominee for U.S. representative from CO-01 in 2012
Flag of Arizona.svg
Arizona
Campaign: May 18, 2018
FEC Filing[189]
Suspended: November 2, 2018
[190][191]
Alan 2020 Still Photo Square.jpg
Alan Augustson
February 14, 1964
(age 55)
Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan
Public policy analyst
Green candidate for U.S. representative from IL-05 in 2009
Green nominee for U.S. representative from IL-05 in 2008
Flag of New Mexico.svg
New Mexico
Reboot America Logo.svg
Campaign: April 6, 2019
FEC Filing[192]
Suspended: June 10, 2019
(endorsed Hunter)
[193][194]
Ian Schlakman (cropped).jpg
Ian Schlakman
December 15, 1984
(age 34)
Suffolk County, New York
Former co-chair of the Maryland Green Party
Green nominee for Governor of Maryland in 2018
Green nominee for U.S. representative from MD-02 in 2014
Flag of Maryland.svg
Maryland
Campaign: December 3, 2018
FEC filing[195]
Suspended: October 18, 2019
[196][197]

Endorsements

Howie Hawkins
Local officials
Individuals
Organizations
Dario Hunter
Individuals
International politicians

Other nominations

Party conventions

Map of United States showing Milwaukee, Charlotte, and Austin
Milwaukee
Milwaukee
Charlotte
Charlotte
Austin
Austin
Detroit
Detroit
  Democratic Party
  Republican Party
  Libertarian Party
  Green Party

The 2020 Democratic National Convention is scheduled from July 13 to 16 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.[208][209]Houston, Texas and Miami Beach, Florida were also considered to host the convention.[210]

The 2020 Republican National Convention is planned to be held in Charlotte, North Carolina, from August 24 to 27.[211]

This will be the first time since 2004 that the two major party conventions will be held at least one month apart with the Summer Olympics in between[212] (in 2008 and 2012, the Democratic and Republican conventions were held in back-to-back weeks following the Summer Olympics, while in 2016 both were held before the Rio Games).

The 2020 Libertarian National Convention will be held in Austin, Texas, over Memorial Day weekend from May 22 to 25.[213][214]

The 2020 Green National Convention will be held in Detroit, Michigan from July9 to 12. Greenville, South Carolina and Spartanburg, South Carolina were also considered to host the convention.[215]

The 2020 Constitution Party National Convention will be held in Charlotte, North Carolina in April. However, the location may be changed to Atlanta, Georgia.[216]

General election debates

Map of United States showing debate locations
University of Notre Dame Indiana
University of Notre Dame
Indiana
University of Utah Salt Lake City
University of Utah
Salt Lake City
University of Michigan Ann Arbor
University of Michigan
Ann Arbor
Belmont University Nashville, Tennessee
Belmont University
Nashville, Tennessee
Sites of the 2020 general election debates

On October 11, 2019, the Commission on Presidential Debates announced that three general election debates would be held in the fall of 2020: the first is scheduled to take place on September 29 at the University of Notre Dame in Notre Dame, Indiana, the second is scheduled to take place on October 15 at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Michigan, and the third is scheduled to take place on October 22 at Belmont University in Nashville, Tennessee. Additionally, one vice presidential debate is scheduled for October 7, 2020, at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City.[217]

General election polling

State predictions

Most election predictors use:

  • "tossup": no advantage
  • "tilt" (used sometimes): advantage that is not quite as strong as "lean"
  • "lean": slight advantage
  • "likely" or "favored": significant, but surmountable, advantage (*highest rating given by Fox News)
  • "safe" or "solid": near-certain chance of victory
State PVI[218] Previous
result
Cook
October 29,
2019
[219]
IE
April 19,
2019
[220]
Sabato
Nov 7,
2019
[221]
Alabama R+14 62.1% R Safe R Safe R Safe R
Alaska R+9 51.3% R Safe R Safe R Safe R
Arizona R+5 48.9% R Tossup Tilt R Tossup
Arkansas R+15 60.6% R Safe R Safe R Safe R
California D+12 61.7% D Safe D Safe D Safe D
Colorado D+1 48.2% D Likely D Safe D Lean D
Connecticut D+6 54.6% D Safe D Safe D Safe D
Delaware D+6 53.1% D Safe D Safe D Safe D
District of Columbia D+41 90.9% D Safe D Safe D Safe D
Florida R+2 49.0% R Tossup Tossup Lean R
Georgia R+5 50.8% R Lean R Likely R Lean R
Hawaii D+18 62.2% D Safe D Safe D Safe D
Idaho R+19 59.3% R Safe R Safe R Safe R
Illinois D+7 55.8% D Safe D Safe D Safe D
Indiana R+9 56.8% R Safe R Safe R Safe R
Iowa R+3 51.2% R Lean R Lean R Lean R
Kansas R+13 56.7% R Safe R Safe R Safe R
Kentucky R+15 62.5% R Safe R Safe R Safe R
Louisiana R+11 58.1% R Safe R Safe R Safe R
Maine D+3 47.8% D Lean D Lean D
(only statewide
rating given)
Lean D
ME-1 D+8 54.0% D Safe D Safe D
ME-2 R+2 51.3% R Lean R Lean R
Maryland D+12 60.3% D Safe D Safe D Safe D
Massachusetts D+12 60.1% D Safe D Safe D Safe D
Michigan D+1 47.5% R Lean D (flip) Tilt D (flip) Lean D (flip)
Minnesota D+1 46.4% D Lean D Likely D Lean D
Mississippi R+9 57.9% R Safe R Safe R Safe R
Missouri R+9 56.8% R Safe R Safe R Safe R
Montana R+11 56.2% R Safe R Safe R Safe R
Nebraska R+14 58.8% R Safe R Safe R
(only statewide
rating given)
Safe R
NE-1 R+11 56.2% R Safe R Safe R
NE-2 R+4 47.2% R Lean R Tossup
NE-3 R+27 73.9% R Safe R Safe R
Nevada D+1 47.9% D Likely D Lean D Lean D
New Hampshire EVEN 47.0% D Lean D Lean D Lean D
New Jersey D+7 55.0% D Safe D Safe D Safe D
New Mexico D+3 48.4% D Safe D Safe D Likely D
New York D+11 59.0% D Safe D Safe D Safe D
North Carolina R+3 49.8% R Tossup Tossup Lean R
North Dakota R+16 63.0% R Safe R Safe R Safe R
Ohio R+3 51.7% R Lean R Likely R Lean R
Oklahoma R+20 65.3% R Safe R Safe R Safe R
Oregon D+5 50.1% D Safe D Safe D Safe D
Pennsylvania EVEN 48.2% R Tossup Tilt D (flip) Tossup
Rhode Island D+10 54.4% D Safe D Safe D Safe D
South Carolina R+8 54.9% R Safe R Safe R Safe R
South Dakota R+14 61.5% R Safe R Safe R Safe R
Tennessee R+14 60.7% R Safe R Safe R Safe R
Texas R+8 52.2% R Likely R Safe R Lean R
Utah R+20 45.5% R Safe R Safe R Safe R
Vermont D+15 56.7% D Safe D Safe D Safe D
Virginia D+1 49.7% D Likely D Safe D Likely D
Washington D+7 52.5% D Safe D Safe D Safe D
West Virginia R+19 68.5% R Safe R Safe R Safe R
Wisconsin EVEN 47.2% R Tossup Tossup Tossup
Wyoming R+25 67.4% R Safe R Safe R Safe R

See also

References

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