AP United States History
Get AP United States History essential facts below. View Videos or join the AP United States History discussion. Add AP United States History to your PopFlock.com topic list for future reference or share this resource on social media.
AP United States History

Advanced Placement United States History (also known as AP U.S. History or APUSH) is a college-level course and examination offered by College Board as part of the Advanced Placement Program.

The Course

The AP U.S. History course is designed to provide the same level of content and instruction that students would face in a freshman-level college survey class. AP U.S. History classes generally use a college-level textbook as the foundation for the course.

Textbooks

Commonly used textbooks that meet the curriculum requirements[1] include:

Conservative criticism

American conservatives have criticized the course framework for downplaying American exceptionalism and failing to foster patriotism. In 2015, a bill to replace the course framework was passed by the Oklahoma House of Representatives' Education Committee, but later withdrawn.[2][3] The course framework was revised in 2015 in response to the criticism. In 2014, student protests in Colorado were held over plans by the Jefferson County Public Schools district board to revise the AP US History curriculum to emphasize citizenship, patriotism, and respect for authority.[4]

Exam

The AP U.S. History exam lasts 3 hours and 15 minutes and consists of two sections; additionally, each section is divided into two parts. Section I, part A includes 55 multiple choice questions with each question containing four choices. The multiple choice questions cover American History from just before European contact with Native Americans to the present day. Moreover, section I, part B includes three short-answer questions. The first two questions are required, but students choose between the third and fourth questions. In total, students are given 95 minutes (55 for the multiple choice section and 40 for three short-answer questions) to complete section I.

Section II of the exam is the free-response section, in which examinees write two essays. Section II, part A, is a document-based question (DBQ), which provides an essay prompt and seven short primary sources or excerpts related to the prompt. Students are expected to write an essay responding to the prompt in which they utilize the sources in addition to outside information. Section II, part B, provides three thematic essay prompts. Students must respond to only one of the three essay prompts.

Each long essay question on the AP exam may address any one of three possible historical reasoning processes: patterns of continuity and change, comparison, or causation. Each of the essay questions will address the same historical reasoning process. There is a fifteen-minute reading period for students to read the essay prompts, take notes, and brainstorm, but students may begin to write the essays before this period ends. Students will then have 85 minutes to write the two essays; 45 minutes are recommended for the DBQ and 40 minutes for the long essay, but students are free to work on the two essays as they see fit.[5]

In May 2011, the AP U.S. History Test was taken by 402,947 students worldwide,[6] making it second in terms of number of examinees, behind the AP English Language and Composition exam.[7]

Scoring

The AP U.S. History exam is divided into two sections. Section one consists of the multiple choice and short answer questions, while section two consists of the document-based question (DBQ) and a long essay question. Section one is worth 60% of the total AP exam score, with 40% of the total exam score derived from the student's performance on the multiple choice section and 20% of the total exam score derived from the student's performance on the short answer questions. The remaining 40% of the total exam score is derived from section two; the document-based question is worth 25% of the total exam score, while the long essay question is worth 15% of the total exam score.[5]

Grade distribution

The score distributions since 2007 were:

Score 2007 2008[8] 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015[9] 2016[10] 2017[11] 2018[12] 2019[13] 2020[14]
5 11.1% 8.5% 11.0% 11.0% 11.0% 11.8% 10.6% 11.0% 9.3% 11.7% 10.9% 10.4% 12.1% 13%
4 19.9% 18.2% 19.5% 18.8% 20.8% 21.4% 21.5% 21.3% 17.8% 17.9% 17.9% 18.2% 18.7% 19.2%
3 22.2% 21.4% 22.1% 22.9% 21.0% 21.7% 21.8% 20.1% 23.6% 22.5% 22.6% 22.5% 23.5% 26.6%
2 26.2% 25.4% 25.2% 25.9% 26.7% 26.5% 27.2% 28.0% 25.0% 23.4% 23.5% 23.1% 22.0% 20.4%
1 20.6% 26.5% 22.2% 21.4% 20.5% 18.6% 18.9% 19.6% 24.3% 24.5% 25.1% 25.8% 23.7% 21%
% of Scores 3 or Higher 53.2% 48.1% 52.6% 52.7% 52.8% 54.9% 53.9% 52.4% 50.7% 52.1% 51.4% 51.1% 54.3% 58.8%
Mean 2.75 2.57 2.72 2.72 2.75 2.81 2.78 2.76 2.63 2.69 2.66 2.64 2.74 2.83
Standard Deviation 1.29 1.28 1.30 1.29 1.29 1.29 1.27 1.29 1.28 1.33 1.31 1.32 1.33 1.31
Number of Students 333,562 346,641 360,173 387,416 406,086 427,796 442,890 462,766 469,689 489,281 505,302 501,530

Composite score range

The College Board has released information on the composite score range (out of 180) required to obtain each grade:[15][16]

Final Score Range (1996) Range (2001) Range (2002) Range (2006)
5 117-180 114-180 115-180 106-180
4 96-116 92-113 94-114 85-105
3 79-95 74-90 76-93 68-84
2 42-73 46-75 47-67 47-67
1 0-50 0-41 0-45 0-46

Note: The above composite score cut points reflect the pre-2011 grading formula which deducted 0.25 points for every incorrect multiple choice answer.

References

  1. ^ "AP United States History: Example Textbook List". CollegeBoard. Archived from the original on May 25, 2011. Retrieved 2011.
  2. ^ Lerner, Adam B. (21 February 2015). "AP U.S. History controversy becomes a debate on America -". Politico. Politico. Retrieved 2015.
  3. ^ "Oklahoma Board of Education targets US History course for being "negative"".
  4. ^ "Hundreds of Colorado students stage protest over history curriculum". The Guardian. Guardian News & Media Limited. Retrieved 2019.
  5. ^ a b "AP US History: Course and Exam Description" (PDF). CollegeBoard. Retrieved 2017.
  6. ^ "AP United States History Student Score Distributions Global AP Exams - May 2011" (PDF). 2011. Retrieved 2011.
  7. ^ "AP Data - Archived Data 2011". Archived from the original on 2013-04-01. Retrieved 2016.
  8. ^ "AP Score Distributions 2008" (PDF). College Board. Retrieved 2019.
  9. ^ Total Registration. "2015 AP Exam Score Distributions". Retrieved 2016.
  10. ^ Registration, Total. "2016 AP Exam Score Distributions". totalregistration.net. Retrieved .
  11. ^ Total Registration. "2017 AP Exam Score Distributions". totalregistration.net. Retrieved .
  12. ^ https://secure-media.collegeboard.org/digitalServices/pdf/research/2018/Student-Score-Distributions-2018.pdf
  13. ^ Total Registration (June 21, 2019). "2019 AP Exam Score Distributions". totalregistration.net. Retrieved .
  14. ^ "https://twitter.com/ap_trevor/status/1280172730118295558". Twitter. Retrieved . External link in |title= (help)
  15. ^ "AP Central". 1 May 2011. Retrieved 2016.
  16. ^ AP: The Grade-Setting Process Archived 2008-12-18 at the Wayback Machine. Retrieved 9 May 2008.

External links


  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

AP_United_States_History
 



 



 
Music Scenes