Abdullah Bughra
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Abdullah Bughra
Abdullah Bughra
Khotan Amir Abdullah Bughra killed at yarkand in april 1934.jpg
Abdullah Bughra
Emir of the First East Turkestan Republic

1933 - April 1934
Personal details
BornKhotan
DiedApril 1934
Yarkand
NationalityUighur
Political partyFlag of the First East Turkestan Republic Young Kashgar Party and Committee for National Revolution[1]
RelationsMuhammad Amin Bughra, Nur Ahmad Jan Bughra

Abdullah Bughra (Uyghur: (Kona Yëziq) , ? ?‎‎; Chinese: ; pinyin: ?bùd?l?·Bùgél?; died 1934)[2] was a Uighur Emir of the First East Turkestan Republic. He was the younger brother of Muhammad Amin Bughra and older brother of Emir Nur Ahmad Jan Bughra. He commanded Uighur and Kirghiz forces during the Battle of Kashgar (1934) against the Chinese Muslim 36th Division (National Revolutionary Army). The Chinese Muslims were loyal to the Chinese government and wanted to crush the Turkic Muslim Uighurs and Kirghiz in revenge for the Kizil massacre. He also had Afghan bodyguards protecting him. He was killed in 1934 at Yarkand by Chinese Muslim troops under general Ma Zhancang. All of Abdullah's fighters were killed, but his body was never found, which later gave rise to speculations about his fate.[3]

Several sources state that Abdullah's head was cut off after he was killed and sent to Id Kah Mosque to be put on display.[4][5]

References

  1. ^ Andrew D. W. Forbes (1986). Warlords and Muslims in Chinese Central Asia: a political history of Republican Sinkiang 1911-1949. Cambridge, England: CUP Archive. p. 64. ISBN 0-521-25514-7. Retrieved .
  2. ^ Ond?ej Klime? (8 January 2015). Struggle by the Pen: The Uyghur Discourse of Nation and National Interest, c.1900-1949. BRILL. pp. 122-. ISBN 978-90-04-28809-6.
  3. ^ Andrew D. W. Forbes (1986). Warlords and Muslims in Chinese Central Asia: a political history of Republican Sinkiang 1911-1949. Cambridge, England: CUP Archive. p. 84. ISBN 0-521-25514-7. Retrieved .
  4. ^ Christian Tyler (2004). Wild West China: the taming of Xinjiang. New Brunswick, New Jersey: Rutgers University Press. p. 116. ISBN 0-8135-3533-6. Retrieved .
  5. ^ Andrew D. W. Forbes (1986). Warlords and Muslims in Chinese Central Asia: a political history of Republican Sinkiang 1911-1949. Cambridge, England: CUP Archive. p. 123. ISBN 0-521-25514-7. Retrieved .

External links


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