Ad Usum Delphini
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Ad Usum Delphini

The Delphin Classics or Ad usum Delphini was series of annotated editions of the Latin classics, intended to be comprehensive, which was originally created in the 17th century.

The first volumes were created in the 1670s for Louis, le Grand Dauphin, heir of Louis XIV (Delphin is the adjective derived from Dauphin), and were written entirely in Latin. Thirty-nine scholars contributed to the series, which was edited by Pierre Huet with assistance from several co-editors, including Jacques-Bénigne Bossuet and Anne Dacier.[1] The main features included the main Latin texts; a paraphrase in the margins or below in simpler Latin prose (an ordo verborum); extended notes on specific words and lines, mainly about history, myth, geography, or natural sciences; and indices. One useful pedagogical feature of this series is that it keeps students reading and working in the target language (Latin). [2].

The original volumes each had an engraving of Arion and the Dolphin, accompanied by the inscription in usum serenissimi Delphini (for the use of the most serene Dauphin). The collection includes 64 volumes published from 1670 to 1698.[3][4][5]

The Ad Usum Delphini series were reprinted for centuries, and served in classrooms across Europe and the Americas. Beginning in 1819 a series of Latin classics was published in England under the name Delphin Classics by Abraham John Valpy.[6] This series was edited by George Dyer (poet), who produced 143 volumes.

The expression Ad usum Delphini was sometimes used on other texts which had been expurgated because they contained passages considered inappropriate for the youth, and has been used pejoratively to indicate any work expurgated for the sake of younger audiences, and not just this series of Latin texts and commentaries.

Publishing history

(Taken from Volpilhac-Auger p. 214. [7])

Author Editor Date and place of publication, Number of volumes
Salluste Daniel Crispin Paris, 1674
Cornelius Nepos Nicolas Courtin Paris, 1675
Phèdre Pierre Danet Paris, 1675
Térence Nicolas le Camus Paris, 1675
Velleius Paterculus Robert Riguez, S. J. Paris, 1675
Panegyria Veteres Jacques de la Beaune, S. J. Paris, 1676
Justin Pierre Joseph Cantel, S. J. Paris, 1676
Claudien Guillaume Pyrrhon (ou Pyron) Paris, 1677
Jules César Jean Goduin, professeur à Paris Paris, 1678
Quinte Curce Michel le Tellier, S. J. Paris, 1678
Manilius Michel La Faye (ou Dufay) ; Pierre Daniel Huet, Remarques sur Manilius ,et Julius Caesar Scaliger, Notes Paris, 1679
Plaute Jacques de l'Ouvre Paris, 1679, 2 vol.
Tite-Live Jean Douiat Paris, 1679,6 vol.
Valère Maxime Pierre Joseph Cantel, S. J. Paris, 1679
Boèce Pierre Cally, professeur à Caen Paris, 1680
Dictys de Crète et Dares de Phrygie Anne Dacier, fille de Tanneguy Lefebvre Paris, 1680
Lucrèce Michel La Faye (ou Dufav) Paris, 1680
Martial Vincent Colesson, professeur de droit Paris, 1680
Aulu-Gelle Jacques Proust, S. J. Paris, 1681
Aurelius Victor Anne Dacier, fille de Tanneguy Lefebvre Paris, 1681
Sextus Pompeius, Festus, et M. Vernus Flaccus André Dacier Paris, 1681
Cicéron, Livres qui concernent l'art oratoire Jacques Proust, S. J. Paris, 1682,2 vol.
Tacite Julien Pichon Paris, 1682,4 vol.
Virgile Charles de la Rue, S. J. Paris, 1682
Eutrope Anne Dacier, fille de Tanneguy Lefebvre Paris, 1683
Cicéron, Discours Charles de Mérouville, S. J. Paris, 1684, 3 vol.
Juvénal et Perse Louis Desprez Paris, 1684
Suétone Augustin Babelon Paris, 1684
Catulle, Tibulle et Properce Philippe Dubois Paris, 1685,2 vol.
Cicéron, Épîtres adfamiliares Philibert Quartier Paris, 1685
Pline l'ancien, Histoire naturelle Jean Hardouin, S. J. Paris, 1685,5 vol.
Stace Claude Berault Paris, 1685, 2 vol.
Prudence Etienne Chamillard, S. J. Paris, 1687
Apulée Jules Fleury, chanoine de Chartres Paris, 1688, 2 vol.
Cicéron, Ouvrages philosophiques François L'Honoré, S. J. Paris, 1689
Ovide Daniel Crispin Lyon, 1689,4 vol.
Horace Louis Desprez Paris, 1691,2 vol.
Pline l'ancien, Histoire naturelle Jean Hardouin, S. J. Paris, 1723, 3 vol. in fol. (nouv. édition)
Ausone Jules Fleury ; Jean-Baptiste Souchay Paris, 1730

See also

References

  1. ^ Wikisource-logo.svg Wood, James, ed. (1907). "Delphin Classics" . The Nuttall Encyclopædia. London and New York: Frederick Warne.
  2. ^ "Favorite Commentaries: Terence Tunberg" in Dickinson Classical Commentaries Blog March 4, 2013 accessed on Jan. 23, 2019.
  3. ^ Volpilhac-Auger, Catherine. "La collection Ad usum Delphini : entre érudition et pédagogie." In: Histoire de l'éducation. n° 74, 1997. Les Humanités classiques, sous la direction de Marie-Madeleine Compère et André Chervel. pp. 203-214. Volpilhac-Auger says the volumes were published mainly between 1673 and 1691, but that the last appeared in 1730.
  4. ^ Classici latini in edizione monolingue (in Italian)
  5. ^ Volpilhac-Auger, Catherine, Martine Furno, and Université de Grenoble 3. 2005. La Collection Ad Usum Delphini. Des Princes. Grenoble: ELLUG.
  6. ^ Delphin Classics (A. J. Valpy) - Book Series List, publishinghistory.com. Retrieved on 1 April 2017.
  7. ^ Volpilhac-Auger, Catherine. "La collection Ad usum Delphini : entre érudition et pédagogie." In: Histoire de l'éducation. n° 74, 1997. Les Humanités classiques, sous la direction de Marie-Madeleine Compère et André Chervel. pp. 203-214, p. 214

External Links


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