Balkan Games
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Balkan Games
Balkan Athletics Championships
Greek: ?
Balkan games.jpg
Poster of the first Balkan Games (1929)
First event1929
Occur everyyear (except 1941-1952, 1987, 1991, 1993 and 1995)
Last event2018
PurposeAthletics event for nations of the Balkans
WebsiteOfficial website

The Balkan Athletics Championships or Balkan Games is a regional athletics competition held between nations from the Balkans and organized by Balkan Athletics. The first games were held in Athens in 1929,[1] and the most recent were being held in Stara Zagora in 2018.[2][3]

Organization

The Games of 1929 were unofficial, and organized by the Hellenic Amateur Athletic Association (SEGAS). They became formalized after 1930 and have been held regularly since, with the exception of the 1940-1953 period due to the Second World War and post-war turmoil. In 1946 and 1947, unofficial Games were organized, under the name Balkan and Central European Games, in which Czechoslovakia, Poland and Hungary (1947) also participated.[4]

SEGAS were also central to the creation of the Balkan Athletics Indoor Championships in 1994 - a sister indoor event to the main outdoor competition.

Nations

Editions

Number Year Host City Country Events
[5] 1929 Athens  Greece
1 1930 Athens  Greece
2 1931 Athens  Greece
3 1932 Athens  Greece
4 1933 Athens  Greece
5 1934 Zagreb  Yugoslavia
6 1935 Istanbul  Turkey
7 1936 Athens  Greece
8 1937 Bucharest  Romania
9 1938 Belgrade  Yugoslavia
10 1939 Athens  Greece
11 1940 Istanbul  Turkey
[5] 1946 Tirana  Albania
[5] 1947 Bucharest  Romania
12 1953 Athens  Greece
13 1954 Belgrade  Yugoslavia
14 1955 Istanbul  Turkey
15 1956 Belgrade  Yugoslavia
16 1957 Athens  Greece
17 1958 Sofia  Bulgaria
18 1959 Bucharest  Romania
19 1960 Athens  Greece
20 1961 Belgrade  Yugoslavia
21 1962 Ankara  Turkey
22 1963 Sofia  Bulgaria
23 1964 Bucharest  Romania
24 1965 Piraeus  Greece
25 1966 Sarajevo  Yugoslavia
26 1967 Istanbul  Turkey
27 1968 Piraeus  Greece
28 1969 Sofia  Bulgaria
29 1970 Bucharest  Romania
30 1971 Zagreb  Yugoslavia
31 1972 Izmir  Turkey
32 1973 Piraeus  Greece
33 1974 Sofia  Bulgaria
34 1975 Bucharest  Romania
35 1976 Celje  Yugoslavia
36 1977 Ankara  Turkey
37 1978 Thessaloniki  Greece
38 1979 Piraeus  Greece
39 1980 Sofia  Bulgaria
40 1981 Sarajevo  Yugoslavia
41 1982 Bucharest  Romania
42 1983 Izmir  Turkey
43 1984 Athens  Greece
44 1985 Stara Zagora  Bulgaria
45 1986 Ljubljana  Yugoslavia
46 1988 Ankara  Turkey
47 1989 Serres  Greece
48 1990 Istanbul  Turkey
49 1992 Sofia  Bulgaria
50 1994 Trikala  Greece
Number Year Host City Country Events
51 1996 Ni?  FR Yugoslavia
52 1997 Athens  Greece
53 1998 Belgrade  FR Yugoslavia
54 1999 Istanbul  Turkey
55 2000 Kavala  Greece
56 2001 Trikala  Greece
57 2002 Bucharest  Romania
58 2003 Thiva  Greece
59 2004 Istanbul  Turkey
60 2005 Novi Sad  Serbia and Montenegro
61 2006 Athens  Greece
62 2007 Plovdiv  Bulgaria
63 2008 Bar  Montenegro
64 2009 Izmir  Turkey
65 2010 Larisa  Greece
66 2011 Stara Zagora  Bulgaria
67 2012 Alexandroupoli  Greece
68 2013 Stara Zagora  Bulgaria
69 2014 Pite?ti  Romania
70 2015 Pite?ti  Romania
71 2016 Pite?ti  Romania
72 2017 Novi Pazar  Serbia
73 2018 Stara Zagora  Bulgaria 42
74 2019 Pravets  Bulgaria
75 2020 [[]] {{}}

All time medal table

from 1930 to 2019.

Championships records

Men

Event Record Athlete Nationality Date Place Ref
100 m 10.11 (+0.5 m/s) Jak Ali Harvey  Turkey 1 August 2015 Pite?ti
200 m 20.50 (-0.6 m/s) Sergii Smelyk  Ukraine 3 September 2019 Pravets, Bulgaria [6]
400 m 45.54 ?eljko Knapi?  Yugoslavia 1979 Athens
800 m 1:45.73 Luciano Su?anj  Yugoslavia 2 August 1974 Sofia
1 500 m 3:40.40 Petre Lupan  Romania 5 August 1972 Izmir
5 000 m 13:42.43 Michalis Kousis  Greece 1978 Thessaloniki
110 m hurdles 13.52 (-0.5 m/s) Zhivko Videnov  Bulgaria 25 August 2002 Bucharest
400 m hurdles 49.36 Athanasios Kalogiannis  Greece 17 July 1998 Ankara
3000 m steeplechase 8:22.77 Florin Ionescu  Romania 28 juin 1997 Athens
High jump 2.31 m Sorin Matei  Romania 16 July 1988 Ankara
Pole vault 5.66 m Emmanouil Karalis  Greece 3 September 2019 Pravets, Bulgaria [7]
Long jump 8.18 m (NWI) Konstadínos Koukodímos  Greece 4 July 1992 Sofia
Triple jump 17.24 m Marian Oprea  Romania 13 July 2003
28 July 2013
Thebes, Greece
Stara Zagora
Shot put 20.96 m Andrei Gag  Romania 2 August 2015 Pite?ti
Discus throw 65.44 m Ion Zamfirache  Romania 15 August 1982 Bucharest
Javelin throw 79.32 m Milan Stijepovi?  Yugoslavia 16 July 1988 Ankara
Hammer throw 79.16 m Aléxandros Papadimitríou  Greece 12 July 2003 Thebes, Greece
Decathlon 7995 pts Sa?a Karan  Yugoslavia 1990 Istanbul
4 × 100 m relay 39.22  Bulgaria 1985 Stara Zagora
4 × 400 m relay 3:03.94  Yugoslavia 17 July 1988 Ankara

Women

Event Record Athlete Nationality Date Place Ref
100 m 10.96 (+0.8 m/s) Ivet Lalova  Bulgaria 2 July 2011 Sliven
200 m 22.45 (+1.2 m/s) Ivet Lalova-Collio  Bulgaria 3 September 2019 Pravets, Bulgaria [8]
400 m 50.98 Jelica Pavli?i?  Yugoslavia 3 August 1974 Sofia
800 m 1:56.42 Paula Ivan  Romania 16 July 1988 Ankara
1500 m 4:04.56 Corina Dumbr?vean  Romania 24 July 2005 Novi Sad
5000 m 15:27.33 Iulia Olteanu  Romania 1997 Athens
100 m hurdles 12.26 Yordanka Donkova  Bulgaria 7 September 1986 Ljubljana
400 m hurdles 54.23 Vania Stambolova  Bulgaria 2 July 2011 Sliven
3000 m steeplechase 9:33.41 Silvia Danekova  Bulgaria 1 August 2015 Pite?ti
High jump 2.01 m Stefka Kostadinova  Bulgaria 6 September 1986 Ljubljana
Pole vault 4.45 m Nikoléta Kiriakopoúlou  Greece 19 July 2008 Argos Orestiko
Long jump 7.14 m (+1.2 m/s) Mirela Dulgheru  Romania 5 July 1992 Sofia
Triple jump 14.60 m (+1.7 m/s) Paraskevi Papachristou  Greece 20 July 2018 Stara Zagora [9]
Shot put 21.11 m Verzhinia Veselinova  Bulgaria 14 June 1980 Sofia
Discus throw 70.20 m Daniela Costian  Romania 17 July 1988 Ankara
Hammer throw 73.97 m Zalina Marghieva  Moldova 2 August 2015 Pite?ti
Javelin throw 60.60 m Marija Vu?enovi?  Serbia 20 July 2018 Stara Zagora [10]
Heptathlon 6304 pts Emilia Dimitrova  Bulgaria 7 September 1986 Ljubljana
4 × 100 m relay 42.89  Bulgaria 1988 Ankara
4 × 400 m relay 3:27.39  Romania 1985 Stara Zagora

1940 athlete naming

The 1940 shot put champion was listed as Arat Ararat from Turkey. The birth name of this athlete was Sokratis Ioannidis, a Greek Orthodox born in Istanbul. Due to political friction between Turkey and Greece at that time, the Turks decided it would be more politically correct to change his name to Arat Ararat. This was the name he was known by in the athletic circles.

References

  1. ^ Balkan Games - Philately
  2. ^ Balkan Games - website
  3. ^ 58th Balkan Games - Report
  4. ^ BALKAN GAMES/CHAMPIONSHIPS
  5. ^ a b c Unofficial Games
  6. ^ "200m Results" (PDF). balkan-athletics.eu. 3 September 2019. Retrieved 2019.
  7. ^ "Pole Vault Results" (PDF). balkan-athletics.eu. 3 September 2019. Retrieved 2019.
  8. ^ "200m Results" (PDF). balkan-athletics.eu. 3 September 2019. Retrieved 2019.
  9. ^ "Triple Jump Results" (PDF). balkan-athletics.eu. 20 July 2018. Retrieved 2018.
  10. ^ "Javelin Throw Results" (PDF). balkan-athletics.eu. 20 July 2018. Retrieved 2018.

See also

External links


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