Banat, Ba%C4%8Dka and Baranja
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Banat, Ba%C4%8Dka and Baranja
Banat, Ba?ka and Baranya
Banat, Ba?ka i Baranja
, ?
Province of the Kingdom of Serbia and the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes
1918-1922
Banat backa baranja 02 map.png
Banat, Ba?ka and Baranja in 1918-1919
CapitalNovi Sad
History 
o Established
November 1918
o Disestablished
1922
Today part of Croatia
 Hungary
 Romania
 Serbia
Division of Banat between Romania and Serbia at the Paris Peace Conference (1919-1920)
parts of Banat, Ba?ka and Baranya plus Syrmia recognized as a territory of the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes at the Paris Peace Conference (1919-1920)

Banat, Ba?ka and Baranya (Serbo-Croatian: Banat, Ba?ka i Baranja / , ? ) was a de facto province of the Kingdom of Serbia and the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes between November 1918 and 1922. It included the geographical regions of Banat, Ba?ka, and Baranya and its administrative center was Novi Sad.

Name

The official name of the province was Banat, Ba?ka and Baranya, but it was also unofficially known as Vojvodina.

History

Following the collapse of Austria-Hungary in October 1918, the regions of Banat, Ba?ka and Baranya came under control of the Serbian army, in November. They entered Novi Sad on 9 November and dismantled the Hungarian-supported Banat Republic on 15 November. The local ethnic Serb population from these regions had already formed its own administration under the supreme authority of Serb National Board in Novi Sad.

On November 25, 1918, the Great National Assembly of Serbs, Bunjevci and other Slavs ( ? ?, ? ? ?, Velika narodna skup?tina Srba, Bunjevaca i ostalih Slovena) German: Große Volksversammlung der Serben, Bunjewatzen und der übrigen Slawen) from Banat, Ba?ka and Baranya, voted that these regions join to the Kingdom of Serbia. The assembly numbered 757 deputies, of whom 578 were Serbs, 84 Bunjevci, 62 Slovaks, 21 Rusyns, 6 Germans, 3 ?okci, 2 Croats, and 1 Hungarian.

The Great People's Assembly decided to join Banat, Ba?ka and Baranya to Serbia, and formed a new local administration (government) in these regions known as the People's Administration for Banat, Ba?ka and Baranya (Serbo-Croatian: Narodna uprava za Banat, Ba?ku i Baranju / ? , ? ). The president of the People's Administration was Jovan Lalo?evi?. The People's Council was formed as the legislative body of the province.

On December 1, the Kingdom of Serbia together with the State of Slovenes, Croats and Serbs formed a new country named Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes.

Although the government in Belgrade accepted the decision that Banat, Ba?ka and Baranya had joined Serbia, it did not recognize the People's Administration. The People's Administration for Banat, Ba?ka and Baranya was active until March 11, 1919, when it held its last session.

Before the peace conference defined the exact borders of the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes, the People's Administration for Banat, Ba?ka and Baranya also administered parts of Banat, Ba?ka and Baranya that today belong to Romania and Hungary.

After the Paris peace conference, the Banat, Ba?ka and Baranya province remained in place until the Vidovdan Constitution of 1921 which established the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats, and Slovenes as a unitary state and replaced in 1922 the 8 Pokrajinas (provinces) by 33 new administrative oblasts (counties) ruled from the center.

Population

The population of Banat, Ba?ka and Baranya (within the borders defined by the peace conference) was 1,365,596, including 29.1% Serbs, 27.71% Hungarians, 23.10% Germans, and others.[1][2] Serbs and Croats together comprised 36.80% of population of the region.[3]

Institutions

Great National Assembly of Serbs, Bunjevci and other Slavs.

The legislative body (parliament) of the province was known as the Great People's Council (Veliki Narodni Savet), while executive body (government) was known as the People's Administration (Narodna Uprava). The Great People's Council consisted of 50 members, which included 35 Serbs, 8 Bunjevci, 5 Slovaks, 1 Krashovan, and 1 Uniate priest.

The People's Administration included following sections:

  • Political affairs
  • Internal affairs
  • Jurisdiction
  • Education
  • Finances
  • Traffic
  • Economy
  • Food and supplies
  • Social reforms
  • People's Health
  • People's Defence

Administrators

See also

Part of a series on the
History of Vojvodina
Flag of Vojvodina.svg Tradicionalna zastava Vojvodine sa grbom.svg
Flag of Serbia.svg Serbia portal

References

  1. ^ Christina Bratt Paulston, Donald Peckham, Linguistic minorities in Central and Eastern Europe, 1998, page 76.
  2. ^ Dr Drago Njegovan, Prisajedinjenje Vojvodine Srbiji, Muzej Vojvodine, Novi Sad, 2004, page 207.
  3. ^ Dr Drago Njegovan, Prisajedinjenje Vojvodine Srbiji, Muzej Vojvodine, Novi Sad, 2004, page 207.

Sources

  • Drago Njegovan, Prisajedinjenje Vojvodine Srbiji, Novi Sad, 2004.
  • Lazo M. Kosti?, Srpska Vojvodina i njene manjine, Novi Sad, 1999.
  • Dimitrije Boarov, Politi?ka istorija Vojvodine, Novi Sad, 2001.
  • ?edomir Popov, Jelena Popov, Autonomija Vojvodine - srpsko pitanje, Sremski Karlovci, 2000.
  • ?irkovi?, Sima (2004). The Serbs. Malden: Blackwell Publishing.CS1 maint: ref=harv (link)

External links


  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

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