Bnei Yehuda, Golan Heights
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Bnei Yehuda, Golan Heights
Bnei Yehuda

Bnei Yehuda is located in Northeast Israel
Bnei Yehuda
Bnei Yehuda
Coordinates: 32°47?54.96?N 35°41?22.55?E / 32.7986000°N 35.6895972°E / 32.7986000; 35.6895972Coordinates: 32°47?54.96?N 35°41?22.55?E / 32.7986000°N 35.6895972°E / 32.7986000; 35.6895972
DistrictNorthern
CouncilGolan
Founded1972
Population
(2017)[1]
1,049

Bnei Yehuda (Hebrew: ) is an Israeli settlement and moshav located in the southern Golan Heights, under the administration of Israel. The moshav was built in 1972 and falls under the municipal jurisdiction of the Golan Regional Council. The international community considers Israeli settlements in the Golan Heights illegal under international law, but the Israeli government disputes this.[2] In 2017 its population was 1,049.[1]

History

Ottoman era

In the winter of 1885, members of the Old Yishuv in Safed formed the Beit Yehuda Society and purchased 15,000 dunams of land from the village of Ramthaniye in the central Golan.[3] Due to financial hardships and difficulty in securing a kushan (Ottoman land deed) the site was abandoned a year later. Soon afterwards, the society regrouped and purchased 2,000 dunams of land from the village of Bir e-Shagum on the western slopes of the Golan.[4]

In 1890, six houses were built with the help of Hovevei Zion from London. In 1906, the population was 33, and land area was 3,500 dunams (3.5 km2). A Hashomer scheme to settle more farmers there in 1913 was not successful.[5][6] The Jews fled in the wake of the 1920 Nebi Musa riots.[7] The last to depart was the Bernstein family, who left on 25 April 1920 after Arabs attacked the village and killed two family members.[8]

Modern village

Modern Bnei Yehuda was founded in 1972 east of the former site by workers of the Negev Nuclear Research Center and Israel Aircraft Industries, following an appeal by the Jewish Agency.[9]

References

  1. ^ a b "Localities File" (XLS). Israel Central Bureau of Statistics. 2017. Retrieved 2019.
  2. ^ "The Geneva Convention". BBC. December 10, 2009.
  3. ^ Separation of Trans-Jordan from Palestine, Yitzhak Gil-Har, The Jerusalem Cathedra, ed. Lee Levine, Yad Yitzhak Ben Zvi and Wayne State University, Jerusalem, 1981, p.306
  4. ^ Reshaping Palestine: From Muhammad Ali to the British Mandate, 1831-1922, Martin Sicker
  5. ^ M. R. Fishbach, Jewish property claims against Arab countries, Columbia University Press (2008), pp36-37.
  6. ^ Aharonson, Ran. Rothschild and early Jewish colonization in Palestine, Rowman & Littlefield, 2000. pg. 98. ISBN 0-7425-0914-1
  7. ^ Separation of Trans-Jordan from Palestine, Yitzhak Gil-Har, The Jerusalem Cathedra, ed. Lee Levine, Yad Yitzhak Ben Zvi and Wayne State University, Jerusalem, 1981, p.306
  8. ^ Vilnai, Ze'ev (1976). "Benei-Yehuda". Ariel Encyclopedia (in Hebrew). Volume 1. Israel: Am Oved. pp. 955-57.
  9. ^ HaReuveni, Immanuel (1999). Lexicon of the Land of Israel (in Hebrew). Miskal - Yedioth Ahronoth Books and Chemed Books. pp. 145-46. ISBN 965-448-413-7.

  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

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