Campaign to Suppress Bandits in Northeastern Guizhou
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Campaign to Suppress Bandits in Northeastern Guizhou
Campaign to Suppress Nationalists in Northeastern Guizhou
Part of the Chinese Civil War
DateSeptember 22, 1950 - November 29, 1950
Location
Northeastern Guizhou, China
Result Communist victory
Belligerents
Flag of the Republic of China Army.svg Republic of China Army (bandits loyal to the Nationalists) PLA People's Liberation Army
Commanders and leaders
Flag of the Republic of China Army.svg Chen Quan (POW)
Flag of the Republic of China Army.svg Shi Zhaozhou 
Flag of the Republic of China Army.svg Liu Gongwang  (POW)
PLA Zen Shaoshan
Strength
32,000+ 13,000
Casualties and losses
32,000+ Minor

Campaign to Suppress Nationalists in Northeastern Guizhou () was a counter-guerrilla / counterinsurgency campaign the communists fought against the nationalist guerrilla that was mostly consisted of bandits and nationalist regular troops left behind after the nationalist regime withdrew from mainland China. The campaign was part of the Chinese Civil War in the post-World War II era fought in northeastern Guizhou, and resulted in communist victory. This campaign is a major part of Campaign to Suppress Bandits in Southwestern China during the Chinese Civil War in the post-World War II era.

Order of battle

Nationalists: (32,000+ total):

  • Northeastern Guizhou People's Self-Salvation Army commanded by Shi Zhaozhou ()
  • Sichuan - Guizhou - Hunan - Hubei Popular Self Defense Army commanded by Chen Quan ()
  • Other bands such as those commanded by Liu Gongwang ()

Communists (13,000+ total) under unified command by Zen Shaoshan ():

Campaign

After communist takeover of Guizhou in November 1949, the few surviving nationalists failed to escape in time decided to join the locals to continue their struggle against their communist enemy. Five counties in northeastern Guizhou including Daozhen (), Zheng'An (), Wuchuan (), Yanhe (), and Dejiang () were controlled by the nationalist guerrilla the communists decided to eliminate these threats. In September 1950, communists gathered enough troops from various detachments and formed the Bandit Eradication Command, and the deputy commander-in-chief of the communist Eastern Sichuan Military District, Zen Shaoshan () was put in charge of the new command.

The first stage of the campaign begun on September 22, 1950 when 20 communist battalions totaling around 13,000 begun their simultaneous attacks on the following four counties: Daozhen (), Zheng'An (), Wuchuan (), and Yanhe (), all of which fell into communist hands immediately. By the beginning of October, 1950, the organized resistance of bandits have mostly ceased. Communists strengthened their political pressure and most bandits were forced to surrender. In the period of fifty - days, over 28,000 bandits were annihilated, including over 22,000 surrendered and defected to the communists.

The second stage of the campaign begun on November 18, 1950 and a total of ten communist battalions concentrated their efforts in the Fanjing () Mountain region where surviving bandits had fled to. After eleven days of fighting, over 4,100 bandits were annihilated, with major bandit chief either captured or killed. The communists subsequently declared the campaign was over as the northeastern Guizhou region was secured.

See also

References

  • Zhu, Zongzhen and Wang, Chaoguang, Liberation War History, 1st Edition, Social Scientific Literary Publishing House in Beijing, 2000, ISBN 7-80149-207-2 (set)
  • Zhang, Ping, History of the Liberation War, 1st Edition, Chinese Youth Publishing House in Beijing, 1987, ISBN 7-5006-0081-X (pbk.)
  • Jie, Lifu, Records of the Libration War: The Decisive Battle of Two Kinds of Fates, 1st Edition, Hebei People's Publishing House in Shijiazhuang, 1990, ISBN 7-202-00733-9 (set)
  • Literary and Historical Research Committee of the Anhui Committee of the Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference, Liberation War, 1st Edition, Anhui People's Publishing House in Hefei, 1987, ISBN 7-212-00007-8
  • Li, Zuomin, Heroic Division and Iron Horse: Records of the Liberation War, 1st Edition, Chinese Communist Party History Publishing House in Beijing, 2004, ISBN 7-80199-029-3
  • Wang, Xingsheng, and Zhang, Jingshan, Chinese Liberation War, 1st Edition, People's Liberation Army Literature and Art Publishing House in Beijing, 2001, ISBN 7-5033-1351-X (set)
  • Huang, Youlan, History of the Chinese People's Liberation War, 1st Edition, Archives Publishing House in Beijing, 1992, ISBN 7-80019-338-1
  • Liu Wusheng, From Yan'an to Beijing: A Collection of Military Records and Research Publications of Important Campaigns in the Liberation War, 1st Edition, Central Literary Publishing House in Beijing, 1993, ISBN 7-5073-0074-9
  • Tang, Yilu and Bi, Jianzhong, History of Chinese People's Liberation Army in Chinese Liberation War, 1st Edition, Military Scientific Publishing House in Beijing, 1993 – 1997, ISBN 7-80021-719-1 (Volum 1), 7800219615 (Volum 2), 7800219631 (Volum 3), 7801370937 (Volum 4), and 7801370953 (Volum 5)

  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

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