Caroline Barron
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Caroline Barron

Caroline Mary Barron OBE (née Hogarth; born 1940)[1] is a British retired medieval historian. She is professor emerita in the department of history at Royal Holloway, University of London.[2] Barron's research relates to "late medieval British history, particularly the history of the City of London, the reign of Richard II and the history of women."[3] She studied at Somerville College, Oxford.

Barron served as President of the London and Middlesex Archaeological Society from 2008 to 2011. She was named President of the British Association For Local History in June 2016, succeeding David Hey.[4]

Barron is an honorary fellow of Somerville College, Oxford and was former President of the Somerville Association.[5]

She was appointed Officer of the Order of the British Empire (OBE) in the 2019 Birthday Honours for services to education.[6]

Personal life

Barron is the granddaughter of David George Hogarth, a noted archaeologist and decorated naval intelligence officer. In 1962, the then Caroline Hogarth married John Barron (1934-2008), a classical scholar and later Master of St Peter's College, Oxford.[7]

Selected publications

  • Medieval London: Collected Papers of Caroline M. Barron, ed. Martha Carlin and Joel. T. Rosenthal. Kalamazoo, Medieval Institute Publications, 2017.
  • London in the Later Middle Ages: Government and People 1200-1500. Oxford, Oxford University Press, 2004.[8]
  • Pilgrim Souls: Margery Kempe and other Women Pilgrims. London, Confraternity of St James, 2004.
  • Hugh Alley's Caveat: the Markets of London in 1598. London Topographical Society, 1988. (with Ian Archer and Vanessa Harding)
  • Revolt in London 11th to 15th June 1381. Museum of London, 1981.
  • The Parish of St Andrew Holborn: the history of the western suburbs of London from Roman times to the Second World War. London, 1979.
  • The Medieval Guildhall of London. Corporation of London, 1974.

References

  1. ^ Goldman, Lawrence (4 October 2012). "Barron, John Penrose (1934-2008)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/9780198614128.001.0001/odnb-9780198614128-e-99526. Retrieved 2019.
  2. ^ "Tutor A to Z | Institute of Continuing Education". Ice.cam.ac.uk. Retrieved 2017.
  3. ^ Caroline Barron. Royal Holloway, University of London. Retrieved 30 May 2015.
  4. ^ "New President Announced | British Association For Local History". BALH. 6 June 2016. Retrieved 2017.
  5. ^ Exploring the Heritage of St Michael and All Angels Church, Great Tew, Somerville College, 18 June 2016
  6. ^ "No. 62666". The London Gazette (Supplement). 8 June 2019. p. B10.
  7. ^ Griffin, Jasper (18 September 2008). "Obituary: John Barron". The Guardian. Retrieved 2019.
  8. ^ "London in the Later Middle Ages - Paperback - Caroline M. Barron - Oxford University Press". Ukcatalogue.oup.com. Retrieved 2017.

External links



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