Cass County, Texas
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Cass County, Texas
Cass County
Cass County Courthouse in Linden
Map of Texas highlighting Cass County
Location within the U.S. state of Texas
Map of the United States highlighting Texas
Texas's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 33°04?N 94°21?W / 33.07°N 94.35°W / 33.07; -94.35
Country
State Texas
Founded1846
Named forLewis Cass
SeatLinden
Largest cityAtlanta
Area
 o Total960 sq mi (2,500 km2)
 o Land937 sq mi (2,430 km2)
 o Water23 sq mi (60 km2)  2.4%%
Population
 o Total30,464
 o Density33/sq mi (13/km2)
Time zoneUTC-6 (Central)
 o Summer (DST)UTC-5 (CDT)
Congressional district4th
Websitewww.co.cass.tx.us

Cass County is a county located in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2010 census, its population was 30,464.[1] The county seat is Linden.[2] The county was named for United States Senator Lewis Cass (D-Michigan), who favored US annexation of Texas in the mid-19th century.

History

Cass County was formed in 1846 from sections of Bowie County.[3] It was named for Lewis Cass,[4] a U.S. Senator from Michigan who had favored the annexation of Texas to the United States.

The county was originally developed by white planters for cotton plantations. By 1860 the majority of the population were enslaved African Americans, who were used as workers. After the war, freedmen worked largely as tenant farmers and sharecroppers into the early 20th century.

From 1861 to 1871, this county was known as Davis County, after Jefferson Davis, the president of the Confederate States of America. (It should not be confused with the still extant Jeff Davis County in West Texas.)

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 960 square miles (2,500 km2), of which 937 square miles (2,430 km2) is land and 23 square miles (60 km2) (2.4%) is water.[5]

Cass County, Texas is one of only three counties in Texas to border two other U.S. states (the others are Bowie and Dallam counties). Cass County forms part of the tripoint of Texas-Arkansas-Louisiana.

Adjacent counties

Major highways

State protected area

Demographics

As of the census[9] of 2010, there were 30,464 people, 12,190 households, and 8,654 families residing in the county. The population density was 32 people per square mile (13/km2). There were 13,890 housing units at an average density of 15 per square mile (6/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 78.20% White, 19.47% Black or African American, 0.47% Native American, 0.14% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.65% from other races, and 1.05% from two or more races. 1.73% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 12,190 households, out of which 30.20% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.90% were married couples living together, 12.20% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.00% were non-families. 26.40% of all households were made up of individuals, and 13.50% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.46 and the average family size was 2.95.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 24.90% under the age of 18, 7.60% from 18 to 24, 24.50% from 25 to 44, 25.40% from 45 to 64, and 17.60% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 92.20 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.50 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $28,441, and the median income for a family was $35,623. Males had a median income of $30,906 versus $19,726 for females. The per capita income for the county was $15,777. About 14.70% of families and 17.70% of the population were below the poverty line, including 22.20% of those under age 18 and 17.90% of those age 65 or over.

Education

The Cass County Club at East Texas State Normal College in 1921

The following school districts serve Cass County:

Communities

Cities

Towns

Unincorporated communities

In popular culture

Don Henley named his 2015 album Cass County, as he had grown up here.[10]

Politics

Presidential elections results
Presidential elections results[11]
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2020 79.2% 11,033 20.1% 2,795 0.7% 99
2016 78.8% 9,726 19.4% 2,391 1.8% 227
2012 74.3% 8,763 24.8% 2,924 0.9% 101
2008 69.9% 8,279 29.5% 3,490 0.7% 77
2004 61.3% 7,383 38.4% 4,630 0.3% 36
2000 57.1% 6,295 41.9% 4,618 1.0% 106
1996 37.5% 4,066 52.5% 5,691 10.0% 1,082
1992 34.3% 3,999 47.0% 5,476 18.7% 2,185
1988 47.1% 5,305 52.8% 5,941 0.1% 16
1984 56.8% 6,677 43.0% 5,053 0.3% 30
1980 46.8% 4,993 52.3% 5,578 0.9% 101
1976 41.8% 3,712 57.9% 5,134 0.3% 29
1972 72.8% 5,303 27.2% 1,981 0.1% 4
1968 26.3% 1,930 34.5% 2,536 39.2% 2,884
1964 42.6% 2,681 57.3% 3,603 0.1% 8
1960 43.9% 2,322 55.5% 2,934 0.6% 34
1956 54.9% 2,970 44.3% 2,395 0.8% 44
1952 44.2% 2,502 55.8% 3,160 0.1% 3
1948 11.7% 457 65.1% 2,540 23.1% 902
1944 14.5% 541 76.6% 2,866 9.0% 335
1940 12.7% 454 87.3% 3,126
1936 6.4% 169 93.6% 2,461
1932 6.7% 224 93.3% 3,135
1928 43.8% 1,323 56.2% 1,698
1924 31.1% 997 66.2% 2,125 2.8% 89
1920 42.6% 1,446 46.0% 1,563 11.4% 388
1916 30.3% 707 64.4% 1,505 5.3% 124
1912 20.6% 402 65.9% 1,284 13.5% 264

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on July 8, 2011. Retrieved 2013.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on 2011-05-31. Retrieved .
  3. ^ JR., HARPER, CECIL (12 June 2010). "CASS COUNTY". www.tshaonline.org.
  4. ^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. Govt. Print. Off. pp. 71.
  5. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved 2015.
  6. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". United States Census Bureau. May 24, 2020. Retrieved 2020.
  7. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2015.
  8. ^ "Texas Almanac: Population History of Counties from 1850-2010" (PDF). Texas Almanac. Retrieved 2015.
  9. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved .
  10. ^ "Review: Don Henley, 'Cass County'". npr.org. 17 September 2015.
  11. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org.

External links

Media related to Cass County, Texas at Wikimedia Commons

Coordinates: 33°04?N 94°21?W / 33.07°N 94.35°W / 33.07; -94.35


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Cass_County,_Texas
 



 



 
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