December 1930
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December 1930

The following events occurred in December 1930:

December 1, 1930 (Monday)

  • 75,000 Scottish coal miners went on strike.[1] The action coincided with a new British coal mining act taking effect which provided for a flat seven-and-a-half-hour working day unless the owners and the miner's federation agreed to a spreadover of 94 hours per fortnight.[2]
  • Born: Joachim Hoffmann, historian, in Königsberg, Germany (d. 2002)

December 2, 1930 (Tuesday)

  • President Herbert Hoover gave his second State of the Union message to Congress. Like the previous year, it was delivered as a written message.[3] "In the larger view", Hoover stated, "the major forces of the depression now lie outside the United States, and our recuperation has been retarded by the unwarranted degree of fear and apprehension created by these outside forces." Hoover reviewed what the government had done to cope with the economic crisis over the past year and asked Congress for up to $150 million to provide further employment through public works.[4]
  • Born: Gary Becker, economist, in Pottsville, Pennsylvania (d. 2014)

December 3, 1930 (Wednesday)

  • Meuse Valley fog: hundreds of people in the Meuse Valley in Belgium began experiencing severe respiratory problems from industrial air pollution. Over 60 people died in the next few days.[5]
  • German police raided a Nazi-inhabited castle near Breslau along the Polish border, arresting hundreds of brownshirts and seizing large quantities of arms and ammunition. The Nazis were organizing a defense force to protect "oppressed" Germans in Upper Silesia.[6]
  • The rebuilt Adelphi Theatre opened in London.[7]
  • Born: Jean-Luc Godard, film director, screenwriter and film critic, in Paris, France

December 4, 1930 (Thursday)

December 5, 1930 (Friday)

  • The film All Quiet on the Western Front had its German premiere at the Berlin Mozartsaal. Nazis led by Joseph Goebbels disrupted the premiere by throwing smoke bombs and sneezing powder, and attacking members of the audience who protested the disturbance.[9][10]
  • Died: Raul Brandão, 63, Portuguese writer, journalist and military officer

December 6, 1930 (Saturday)

December 7, 1930 (Sunday)

December 8, 1930 (Monday)

  • The Soviet Union reduced the five death sentences handed down in the Industrial Party Trial to ten years' imprisonment. An official bulletin explained that the decision was made because the sentenced men had "repented their crimes" and "because soviet power cannot be guided by a mere desire for revenge".[12]
  • The Cole Porter stage musical The New Yorkers made its Broadway debut at the Broadway Theatre.[13]
  • Black Coffee, the first play written by the crime novelist Agatha Christie, premiered at the Embassy Theatre in London.
  • Born: Stan Richards, actor, in Barnsley, South Yorkshire, England (d. 2005); Maximilian Schell, actor, director and producer, in Vienna, Austria (d. 2014)

December 9, 1930 (Tuesday)

  • Five Italian communists were sentenced to prison terms of three to ten years for spreading propaganda in Turin.[14]
  • Born: Buck Henry, actor, writer and director, in New York City; Edoardo Sanguineti, poet, writer and academic, in Genoa, Italy (d. 2010)
  • Died: Rube Foster, 51, American baseball player, manager and executive; Laura Muntz Lyall, 70, Canadian Impressionist painter

December 10, 1930 (Wednesday)

December 11, 1930 (Thursday)

  • Germany's board of film censors banned All Quiet on the Western Front from the country, explaining that the film dwelled too much on Germany's defeat and painted an inaccurate picture of its military. The Nazis, who had disrupted screenings of the film for all six days of its release, hailed the decision as a great victory and a "vindication of German honour."[17]
  • The Bank of United States and its 59 branches were closed and its assets taken over by the New York State Superintendent of Banks.[18]
  • Bugs Moran was acquitted of vagrancy charges by a jury in an Illinois court.[19]
  • Born: Jean-Louis Trintignant, actor, screenwriter and director, in Piolenc, France; James Arthur Williams, antique dealer and historic preservationist, in Gordon, Georgia (d. 1990)

December 12, 1930 (Friday)

December 13, 1930 (Saturday)

December 14, 1930 (Sunday)

December 15, 1930 (Monday)

December 16, 1930 (Tuesday)

December 17, 1930 (Wednesday)

December 18, 1930 (Thursday)

December 19, 1930 (Friday)

  • Vyacheslav Molotov became Chairman of the Council of People's Commissars of the Soviet Union, replacing Alexei Rykov.[37]
  • The Finnish ships Oberon and Arcturus collided in a fog off Læsø, Denmark. The Oberon sank with the loss of 42 of 82 on board. Coincidentally, the two ships were captained by brothers.[38][39]
  • Japan sent a note of protest to the Soviet Union, calling its closure of the Japanese-Korean bank an "unfriendly act".[40]
  • Retired French general Joseph Joffre had his right foot amputated in an attempt to save his life as gangrene set in. The operation was kept a secret for eight days.[41]

December 20, 1930 (Saturday)

  • President Hoover signed the $110 million emergency construction bill and a $45 million drought relief bill.[42]
  • Born: Pat Hare, blues guitarist and singer, in Cherry Valley, Arkansas (d. 1980)

December 21, 1930 (Sunday)

December 22, 1930 (Monday)

December 23, 1930 (Tuesday)

  • Former Indiana governor Warren T. McCray was granted a pardon by President Hoover. McCray had served three years in prison for fraud.[45]

December 24, 1930 (Wednesday)

December 25, 1930 (Thursday)

December 26, 1930 (Friday)

December 27, 1930 (Saturday)

  • A landslide after heavy rain in Algiers crashed down on a house where a wedding was being celebrated, killing 30.[50]
  • Born: Wilfrid Sheed, American novelist and essayist, in England (d. 2011)

December 28, 1930 (Sunday)

December 29, 1930 (Monday)

  • An article by the Italian Futurist Filippo Tommaso Marinetti was published in the Gazzetta del Popolo, in which he called for the abolition of pasta in favour of Futurist meals. Marinetti explained that pasta was hard to digest and made Italians "skeptical, slow [and] pessimistic", in addition to requiring heavy importation to Italy. Rice, on the other hand, would create "lithe, agile peoples who will be victorious" in future wars and was already being homegrown in vast amounts. The manifesto also called for the abolition of the knife and fork.[52][53][54]
  • The Econometric Society was founded.
  • Died: Walter L. Cohen, 70, African-American politician and businessman

December 30, 1930 (Tuesday)

December 31, 1930 (Wednesday)

References

  1. ^ Steele, John (December 2, 1930). "Peace Moves in Scottish Coal Mine Strike Fail". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 15.
  2. ^ Steele, John (December 31, 1930). "Britain Faces Big New Year Strike of 320,000 Men". Chicago Daily Tribune: 4.
  3. ^ Peters, Gerbhard; Woolley, John T. "State of the Union Addresses and Messages". The American Presidency Project. Retrieved 2015.
  4. ^ Peters, Gerbhard; Woolley, John T. "Annual Message to Congress on the State of the Union - December 2, 1930". The American Presidency Project. Retrieved 2015.
  5. ^ "The Meuse Valley fog of 1930: an air pollution disaster" (PDF). Department of Medical History. March 3, 2001. Retrieved 2015.
  6. ^ "German Police Raid "Fort" on Polish Border". Chicago Daily Tribune. December 4, 1930. p. 13.
  7. ^ a b c Mercer, Derrik (1989). Chronicle of the 20th Century. London: Chronicle Communications Ltd. p. 399. ISBN 978-0-582-03919-3.
  8. ^ Taylor, Edmond (December 5, 1930). "French Cabinet Falls by Eight Votes". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  9. ^ "Nazi Propaganda and Censorship". United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. Retrieved 2015.
  10. ^ "Tageseinträge für 5. Dezember 1930". chroniknet. Retrieved 2015.
  11. ^ "Order Death for 5 Russian Plotters". Chicago Daily Tribune. December 8, 1930. p. 1.
  12. ^ "Russia Spares Lives of 5 Men Doomed to Die". Chicago Daily Tribune. December 9, 1930. p. 7.
  13. ^ Slide, Anthony (1994). The Encyclopedia of Vaudeville. University Press of Mississippi. p. 149. ISBN 978-1-61703-250-9.
  14. ^ "5 Red Propagandists Get Prison Terms in Italy". Chicago Daily Tribune. December 10, 1930. p. 17.
  15. ^ Fuller, Robert Lynn (2014-01-10). "Phantom of Fear": The Banking Panic of 1933. McFarland & Company. p. 19. ISBN 978-0-7864-8685-4.
  16. ^ "German Jobless Fight Cops; One Slain, Six Hurt". Chicago Daily Tribune. December 11, 1930. p. 8.
  17. ^ Schultz, Sigrid (December 12, 1930). "Germany Bans War Talkie of Remarque Book". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 12.
  18. ^ "Bank of U. S. Is Taken Over By Broderick". Brooklyn Daily Eagle. December 11, 1930. p. 1.
  19. ^ "Find Gangster Not Guilty in Vagrancy Case". Chicago Daily Tribune. December 12, 1930. p. 1.
  20. ^ "Revolt in Spain Started by Troops". Chicago Daily Tribune. December 13, 1930. p. 1.
  21. ^ "1930". Music and History. Archived from the original on August 28, 2012. Retrieved 2015.
  22. ^ "Tageseinträge für 12. Dezember 1930". chroniknet. Retrieved 2015.
  23. ^ "Rebels in Spain Face Death". Chicago Daily Tribune. December 14, 1930. p. 1.
  24. ^ "Tageseinträge für 13. Dezember 1930". chroniknet. Retrieved 2015.
  25. ^ "1930-1939". Military.com. Retrieved 2015.
  26. ^ "Miami Ship Sinks; Save 125". Chicago Daily Tribune. December 15, 1930. p. 1.
  27. ^ "Firing Squads Kill Two Rebel Chiefs in Spain". Chicago Daily Tribune. December 15, 1930. p. 1.
  28. ^ "20 December 1930, Page 2". The Spectator. December 20, 1930. Retrieved 2015.
  29. ^ "The Revolt in Spain". The Straits Times. Singapore: 13. December 16, 1930.
  30. ^ Rozendaal, Neal (2012). Duke Slater: Pioneering Black NFL Player and Judge. Jefferson, North Carolina: McFarland & Company, Inc. p. 131. ISBN 978-0-7864-6957-4.
  31. ^ McLaughlin, Kathleen (December 15, 1930). "Capone Sister Wed; Seize 5 Armed Guards". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  32. ^ "Tageseinträge für 15. Dezember 1930". chroniknet. Retrieved 2015.
  33. ^ "11 More Banks Close Doors in North Carolina". Chicago Daily Tribune. December 17, 1930. p. 17.
  34. ^ "Russia Forbids all Workers to Change Jobs". Chicago Daily Tribune. December 18, 1930. p. 1.
  35. ^ "Tageseinträge für 18. Dezember 1930". chroniknet. Retrieved 2015.
  36. ^ Reid, John Howard (2008). Silent Films & Early Talkies on DVD: A Classic Movie Fan's Guide. Lulu.com. ISBN 978-1-4357-1073-3.
  37. ^ "Tageseinträge für 19. Dezember 1930". chroniknet. Retrieved 2015.
  38. ^ "Christmas Ship Sinks; 40 Lost; 36 Rescued". Chicago Daily Tribune. December 20, 1930. p. 1.
  39. ^ "The Oberon disaster". The Times (45702). London. 22 December 1930. col D, p. 12.
  40. ^ Powell, John (December 20, 1930). "Japan Angry at Russia; Charges Unfriendliness". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 10.
  41. ^ Wales, Henry (December 28, 1930). "Hero of Marne Fights Death". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  42. ^ Crawford, Arthur (December 21, 1930). "Senate Votes 311 Millions". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 2.
  43. ^ "Russia's Ousted Premier Fired from 2d Post". Chicago Daily Tribune. December 22, 1930. p. 7.
  44. ^ "Russia Orders More Food for Hungry Millions". Chicago Daily Tribune. December 23, 1930. p. 8.
  45. ^ "Hoover Grants Full Pardon to W. T. McCray, Ex-Governor". Chicago Daily Tribune. December 24, 1930. p. 2.
  46. ^ "Tageseinträge für 24. Dezember 1930". chroniknet. Retrieved 2015.
  47. ^ "Tageseinträge für 25. Dezember 1930". chroniknet. Retrieved 2015.
  48. ^ "Prince Louis of Monaco Sets up Dictatorship". Chicago Daily Tribune. December 27, 1930. p. 3.
  49. ^ "Frankie Genaro". BoxRec. Retrieved 2015.
  50. ^ "Landslide Hurls 30 to Death at Arab Wedding". Chicago Daily Tribune. December 28, 1930. p. 4.
  51. ^ Partsch-Bergsohn, Isa (1994). Modern Dance in Germany and the United States: Crosscurrents and Influences. Harwood Academic Publishers. p. 65. ISBN 978-3-7186-5557-1.
  52. ^ Boisvert, Raymond D. (2014). I Eat, Therefore I Think: Food and Philosophy. Lanham, Maryland: Rowman & Littlefield Publishing Group, Inc. p. 148. ISBN 978-1-61147-687-3.
  53. ^ Brickman, Sophie (September 1, 2014). "The Food of the Future". The New Yorker. Retrieved 2015.
  54. ^ Taylor, Edmond (December 30, 1930). "Ah! Mussolini! Spare Italy this Great Hardship". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 7.
  55. ^ Butowsky, Harry A. "History and Definition of the Names of Historical Units within the National Park System". National Park Service History. Retrieved 2015.
  56. ^ "Five Star Final". Playbill Vault. Retrieved 2015.
  57. ^ "Busch Grandson Kidnaped". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 1, 1931. p. 1.
  58. ^ O'Neil, Tim (December 28, 2013). "A Look Back - Busch family heir kidnapped on New Year's Eve in 1930". St. Louis Post-Dispatch. Retrieved 2015.

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