Dina Rubina
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Dina Rubina
Dina Rubina, 2011

Dina Ilyinichna Rubina (Russian: ? ? ?; Hebrew: ? ‎, born 19 September 1953 in Tashkent) is a Russian-Israeli prose writer.

Biography

Dina Rubina was born in Tashkent, Uzbekistan. She studied music at the Tashkent Conservatory. She published her first story at the age of sixteen in "Yunost." In the mid-1980s, after writing for the stage and screen for several years, she moved to Moscow. In 1990 she immigrated to Israel.[1]

Literary career

Dina Rubina is one of the most prominent Russian-language Israeli writers.[2] Her books have been translated into thirty languages.[3]

Her major themes are Jewish and Israeli history, migration, nomadism and neo-indigeneity, messianism and metaphysics,[4] theatre, autobiography, and the interplay between the Israeli and Russian Jewish cultures and between Hebrew and Russian.[5]

Dina Rubina in Moscow, 2010

Dual Surname (? ?) was turned into a film screened on Russia's Channel One.

In 2007, Rubina won the Russian Big Book literary award.[6]

Published works

Novels

  • 1996 -- Messiah comes! (« ? !»)
  • 1998 -- Last wild pig from Pontevedra (« ?»)
  • 2004 -- The Syndicate («»)
  • 2006 -- Sun side of the Street(« ? »)
  • 2008 -- Style of Leonardo (« ») ISBN 978-5-699-27962-3, 978-5-699-27369-0
      • 3 more editions
  • 2009 -- White dove of Cordova (« ? ?»), ISBN 978-5-699-37343-7
      • 2 more editions
  • 2010 -- Petrushka's Syndrome («? »). ISBN 978-5-699-45611-6

Short stories

  • 1980 -- « ?...?»
  • 1982 -- « ? »
  • 1987 -- « ?!»
  • 1990 -- «? ?»
  • 1994 -- «? »
  • 1996 -- « »
  • 1997 -- « »
  • 1999 -- «? ? »
  • 1999 -- «? ? »
  • 2002 -- « ? »
  • 2002 -- «? ? »
  • 2002 -- « »
  • 2003 -- « ? ? »
  • 2004 -- « »
  • 2008 -- «? ? »
  • 2008 -- «?, ?!..»
  • 2008 -- «-»
  • 2008 -- « »
  • 2008 -- « ? »
  • 2008 -- « !..» ?
  • 2009 -- «»
  • 2010 -- « ...». ?, ? , 432 ?., 4000 ., ISBN 978-5-699-41269-3
  • 2010 -- « ». ?, ISBN 978-5-699-43666-8; 2010 ?.
  • 2010 -- «? ? ». ?. ?, ? , 416 ?., : 4000 ., ISBN 978-5-699-39797-6
  • 2010 -- «? »
  • 2011 -- «?»
  • 2012 -- «?»

Essays

  • 1999 -- « »
  • «? -- »
  • «? ?, - »
  • Call me! («? , ?!»)
  • «?» (Children)
  • «? ?!»
  • 2001 - What to do? (« »)
  • Mein pijak in weisse kletka («? ...»)
  • Jerusalem bus («? ?»)
  • Afterwords (« ? »)

English translations

  • The Blackthorn, a story from Lives in Transit, Ardis Publishers, 1995.

See also

Bibliography

  • Katsman, Roman. Nostalgia for a Foreign Land: Studies in Russian-Language Literature in Israel. Series: Jews of Russia and Eastern Europe and Their Legacy. Brighton MA: Academic Studies Press, 2016.
  • Kuznetsova, Natalia. "Simvolika ognia v romane-komikse Diny Rubinoi 'Sindikat,' ili Ob 'ognennom angele nashego podiezda'" [Symbolism of fire in the novel-comics by Dina Rubina "Sindicate"]. Booknik, March 20, 2008. Accessed June 20, 2014. booknik.ru/library/all/simvolika-ognya-v-romane-komikse-diny-rubinoyi-sindikat-ili-ob-ognennom-angele-nashego-podezda.
  • Mondry, Henrietta. Exemplary Bodies: Constructing the Jew in Russian Culture, 1880s to 2008. Boston: Academic Studies Press, 2009.
  • Ronell, Anna P. "Some Thoughts on Russian-Language Israeli Fiction: Introducing Dina Rubina." Prooftexts 28, no. 2 (2008): 197-231.
  • Sergo, Iulia. "Postmodernistski dialog kultur: obraz Ispanii v romane D. Rubinoi 'Poslednyi kaban iz lesov Pontevedra'" [Postmodern dialogue of cultures: The image of Spain in Dina Rubina's novel The last wild boar from the forests of Pontevedra]. Filologicheski klass 17 (2007): 49-53.
  • Shafranskaya, Eleonora. Sindrom golubki [Dove syndrome]. St. Petersburg: Svoio izdatelstvo, 2012.
  • Shkarpetkina, Olga. "'Poslednyi kaban iz lesov Pontevedra' Diny Rubinoi" [The last wild boar from the forests of Pontevedra by Dina Rubina]. Kultura i iskusstvo, July 20, 2013. Accessed June 15, 2014. www.cultandart.ru/prose/48269-poslednij_kaban_iz_lesov_pontevedra.

References

  1. ^ Russian Literature Online
  2. ^ Anna Wexler Katsnelson, "Belated Zionism: The Cinematographic Exiles of Mikhail Kalik", Jewish Social Studies New Series 14.3, Spring-Summer 2008, pp. 126–49, note 24, p. 145: "arguably Israel's best-known author in the Russian language".
  3. ^ Contemporary Jewish Writing in Europe: A Guide, edited by Vivian Liska and Thomas Nolden
  4. ^ Katsman, Roman (2016). "Nostalgia for a Foreign Land: Studies in Russian-Language Literature in Israel". Academic Studies Press.
  5. ^ Anna P. Ronell, "Some Thoughts on Russian-Language Israeli Fiction: Introducing Dina Rubina", Prooftexts 28.2, Spring 2008, pp. 197–231.
  6. ^ Jewish Russian Telegraph, A Russian Cultural Patriot, interview by Dmitry Babich

External links


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