Elmore County, Alabama
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Elmore County, Alabama
Elmore County
County courthouse in Wetumpka
County courthouse in Wetumpka
Map of Alabama highlighting Elmore County
Location within the U.S. state of Alabama
Map of the United States highlighting Alabama
Alabama's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 32°35?49?N 86°09?05?W / 32.596944444444°N 86.151388888889°W / 32.596944444444; -86.151388888889
Country
State Alabama
FoundedFebruary 15, 1866
Named forJohn A. Elmore
SeatWetumpka
Largest cityMillbrook
Area
 o Total657 sq mi (1,700 km2)
 o Land618 sq mi (1,600 km2)
 o Water39 sq mi (100 km2)  5.9%%
Population
 o Total79,303
 o Estimate 
(2019)
81,209
 o Density120/sq mi (47/km2)
Demonym(s)Elmorean
Time zoneUTC-6 (Central)
 o Summer (DST)UTC-5 (CDT)
Congressional district2nd
Websitewww.elmoreco.org
 
  • County Number 29 on Alabama Licence Plates

Elmore County is a county located in the east central portion of the U.S. state of Alabama. As of the 2010 census, the population was 79,303.[1] Its county seat is Wetumpka.[2] Its name is in honor of General John A. Elmore.[3]

Elmore County is part of the Montgomery, AL Metropolitan Statistical Area.

History

Elmore County was established on February 15, 1866, from portions of Autauga, Coosa, Tallapoosa, and Montgomery counties.[4]

The French established Fort Toulouse at the confluence of the Coosa and Tallapoosa in 1717.[4]

Gen. Andrew Jackson then erected Fort Jackson in 1814 at the site of Fort Toulouse following the Battle of Horseshoe Bend.

On July 2, 1901, a local mob lynched Robert (or perhaps Robin) White. In a strange turn of events, a local farmer, George White confessed in court to the killing and named five other local men as killers. Three men were convicted in the killing and sentenced to ten years in prison. On 9 June 1902, they were pardoned by Governor Jelks. In 1915 another Black man was taken from the local jail and murdered.[5]

In 1950, a City Planning Board was formed in the county seat of Wetumpka.[6]

In 1957, the National Guard Armory was constructed in the county seat of Wetumpka.[]

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 657 square miles (1,700 km2), of which 618 square miles (1,600 km2) is land and 39 square miles (100 km2) (5.9%) is water.[7]

The county is located on the fall line of the eastern United States, and consequently boasts a diverse geography. Most of the county contains rolling hills, being located in the Piedmont region. Some parts of the county do have open fields and farmland as well. The cities of Wetumpka and Tallassee are important river cities located on the fall line.

Major highways

Adjacent counties

Demographics

At the 2000 census there were 65,874 people, 22,737 households, and 17,552 families living in the county. The population density was 106 people per square mile (41/km2). There were 25,733 housing units at an average density of 41 per square mile (16/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 77.02% White, 20.64% Black or African American, 0.43% Native American, 0.36% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.48% from other races, and 1.04% from two or more races. 1.22% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.[13] Of the 22,737 households 37.40% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 61.40% were married couples living together, 12.00% had a female householder with no husband present, and 22.80% were non-families. 20.00% of households were one person and 7.70% were one person aged 65 or older. The average household size was 2.66 and the average family size was 3.07.

The age distribution was 25.70% under the age of 18, 8.80% from 18 to 24, 32.10% from 25 to 44, 22.70% from 45 to 64, and 10.70% 65 or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females, there were 102.50 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 101.30 males.

The median household income was $41,243 and the median family income was $47,155. Males had a median income of $32,643 versus $24,062 for females. The per capita income for the county was $17,650. About 7.40% of families and 10.20% of the population were below the poverty line, including 14.20% of those under age 18 and 11.30% of those age 65 or over. In the late 1990s, voters voted to pass a mandatory fire fee for volunteer fire services. All citizens pay this same fee regardless of valuation of the property or income levels.

2010 census

At the 2010 census there were 79,303 people, 28,301 households, and 21,003 families living in the county. The population density was 128 people per square mile (49/km2). There were 32,657 housing units at an average density of 49.7 per square mile (19.2/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 76.2% White, 20.0% Black or African American, 0.4% Native American, 0.7% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 1.2% from other races, and 1.4% from two or more races. 2.7% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.[14] Of the 28,301 households 32.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.6% were married couples living together, 13.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 25.8% were non-families. 22.0% of households were one person and 7.8% were one person aged 65 or older. The average household size was 2.61 and the average family size was 3.04.

The age distribution was 23.6% under the age of 18, 9.3% from 18 to 24, 27.9% from 25 to 44, 27.4% from 45 to 64, and 11.9% 65 or older. The median age was 37.8 years. For every 100 females, there were 95.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.7 males.

The median household income was $53,128 and the median family income was $62,870. Males had a median income of $46,952 versus $31,542 for females. The per capita income for the county was $22,640. About 9.1% of families and 12.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 16.8% of those under age 18 and 9.4% of those age 65 or over.

Government and infrastructure

The Julia Tutwiler Prison for Women of the Alabama Department of Corrections is in Wetumpka in Elmore County. The prison houses Alabama's female death row.[15] Wetumpka was previously the site of the Wetumpka State Penitentiary.[16]

Politically, Elmore County is heavily Republican. It last voted Democratic for Jimmy Carter in 1976, which incidentally was also the last time a Democrat carried Alabama at the presidential level.

Presidential elections results

Economy

Over the past two decades,[when?] Elmore County has transferred from an economy based on agriculture to one of Alabama's fastest-growing counties. According to a recent report, 1110 jobs were created over the last 4 years.[18]

Elmore County's largest employer is the manufacturing sector. The top ten manufacturers in Elmore County include: GKN Aerospace, Neptune Technologies, Frontier Yarns, Russell Corporation, Madix, Inc, Arrowhead Composites, Hanil USA, YESAC Alabama Corporation, Quality Networks, Inc., and AES Industries.[]

Education

The Elmore County Public School System serves the county.

Communities

Cities

Towns

Census-designated places

Unincorporated communities

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 28, 2014. Retrieved 2014.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved 2011.
  3. ^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. Govt. Print. Off. pp. 118.
  4. ^ a b EL. "Alabama Dept of Archives". Retrieved 2019.
  5. ^ Lyman, Brian (10 January 2018). "The lynching of Robin White and the confession of George Howard". Montgomery Advertiser. Retrieved 2019.
  6. ^ EL. "City of Wetumpka History". Retrieved 2019.
  7. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved 2015.
  8. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved 2019.
  9. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2015.
  10. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved 2015.
  11. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed. (March 24, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2015.
  12. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Retrieved 2015.
  13. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2011.
  14. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2015.
  15. ^ "Annual Report Fiscal Year 2003." Alabama Department of Corrections. 45/84. Retrieved on August 15, 2010. "Tutwiler also has a death row,"
  16. ^ "ADOC History Archived May 11, 2012, at the Wayback Machine." Alabama Department of Corrections. Retrieved on September 6, 2010.
  17. ^ "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". Retrieved 2016.
  18. ^ 1110 Jobs created in Elmore County Archived December 20, 2008, at the Wayback Machine

External links

Coordinates: 32°35?49?N 86°09?05?W / 32.59694°N 86.15139°W / 32.59694; -86.15139


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Elmore_County,_Alabama
 



 



 
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