Fort Recovery, Ohio
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Fort Recovery, Ohio
Fort Recovery, Ohio
Victory monument in Fort Recovery
Victory monument in Fort Recovery
Location in Mercer County and the state of Ohio.
Location in Mercer County and the state of Ohio.
Coordinates: 40°24?44?N 84°46?40?W / 40.41222°N 84.77778°W / 40.41222; -84.77778Coordinates: 40°24?44?N 84°46?40?W / 40.41222°N 84.77778°W / 40.41222; -84.77778
CountryUnited States
StateOhio
CountyMercer
TownshipsGibson and Recovery
Government
 o MayorDave Kaup[1]
 o Village administratorRandy Diller[1]
Area
 o Total1.07 sq mi (2.77 km2)
 o Land1.05 sq mi (2.72 km2)
 o Water0.02 sq mi (0.05 km2)
Elevation942 ft (287 m)
Population
 o Total1,430
 o Estimate 
(2018[5])
1,456
 o Density1,361.9/sq mi (525.8/km2)
Time zoneUTC-5 (Eastern (EST))
 o Summer (DST)UTC-4 (EDT)
ZIP code
45846
Area code(s)419
FIPS code39-27902[6]
GNIS feature ID1040590[3]
Websitehttp://www.fortrecovery.org/

Fort Recovery is a village in Mercer County, Ohio, United States. The population was 1,430 at the 2010 census. The village is near the location of Fort Recovery, first established in 1793 under orders from General Anthony Wayne.[7] The town is located near the headwaters of the Wabash River.

Geography

The former location of the Wabash River running by the former location of the original Fort Recovery.

Fort Recovery is located at 40°24?44?N 84°46?40?W / 40.412156°N 84.777641°W / 40.412156; -84.777641.[8]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the village has a total area of 1.07 square miles (2.77 km2), of which 1.05 square miles (2.72 km2) is land and 0.02 square miles (0.05 km2) is water.[2]

The northwest corner of the Greenville Treaty Line is located in Fort Recovery.

Fort Recovery is located at the confluence of a number of major area roads, including State Route 119, State Route 49, Sharpsburg Road, Union City Road, Wabash Road, and Fort Recovery-Minster Road. Fort Recovery was a stop along the New York, Chicago and St. Louis Railroad that connected Buffalo to Chicago and St. Louis.

The Wabash River passes through Fort Recovery.

History

A Greenville Treaty Line marker at Fort Recovery.

Two well known battles of the Northwest Indian War took place at Fort Recovery. At the time, Ohio was claimed and populated by Native American nations, and conflict broke out when the young United States established settlements north of the Ohio River. In 1791, Northwest Territory governor Arthur St. Clair led a campaign north from Fort Washington to pacify the Western Confederacy at Kekionga. Instead, the United States force was destroyed in the early morning of November 4. St. Clair's Defeat remains the greatest loss by the United States Army to a Native American force.[9]

As a direct result of the Native American victory, the Legion of the United States was founded and placed under the command of General "Mad Anthony" Wayne. In late 1793, Wayne led 300 men to the site of St. Clair's defeat and deliberately had Fort Recovery built there. On December 25, they identified the site due to the large amount of unburied remains. Private George Will wrote that to setup camp, the unit had to move bones to make space for their beds.[10] On June 30 of that year, a large Native American force and a few British officers conducted the Siege of Fort Recovery. Although the Legion suffered high casualties, they were able to maintain control of the fort, in part because they had recovered cannons lost by St. Clair in 1791. Wayne used Fort Recovery as a staging ground for advances into the territory. He ultimately defeated the Native American confederacy at the Battle of Fallen Timbers in August 1794. In 1795, confederacy representatives signed the Treaty of Greenville, which ceded control of most of the modern state of Ohio, using Fort Recovery as a reference point for the border between Native American and United States territories.[11]

In 1818, a Virginia soldier who fought at the battle of St. Clair's Defeat returned to the area in search of silver he left by a standing oak tree. The soldier remained in the area for an unknown amount of time and was later found dead in the woods. In 1852, a local resident struck metal with a grubbing hoe. The metal was iron bands encasing a small wooden box, and 900 Spanish doubloons were found, valued at $14 thousand (equivalent to $430 thousand in today's dollars)[12], in 1852.[13]

Demographics

Religion in Fort Recovery
religion percent
Roman Catholic
78.4%
Protestant
16.3%
No Religion
5.1%
"Unspecified"
0.2%

2010 census

As of the census[4] of 2010, there were 1,430 people, 555 households, and 391 families living in the village. The population density was 1,361.9 inhabitants per square mile (525.8/km2). There were 589 housing units at an average density of 561.0 per square mile (216.6/km2). The racial makeup of the village was 97.7% White, 0.1% African American, 0.1% Native American, 0.1% Asian, 0.7% from other races, and 1.3% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.1% of the population.

There were 555 households of which 32.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.8% were married couples living together, 9.9% had a female householder with no husband present, 3.8% had a male householder with no wife present, and 29.5% were non-families. 27.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.58 and the average family size was 3.16.

The median age in the village was 34.8 years. 28.2% of residents were under the age of 18; 6.6% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 26.7% were from 25 to 44; 24% were from 45 to 64; and 14.7% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the village was 51.0% male and 49.0% female.

2000 census

As of the census[6] of 2000, there were 1,273 people, 508 households, and 353 families living in the village. The population density was 1,324.9 people per square mile (512.0/km2). There were 536 housing units at an average density of 557.8 per square mile (215.6/km2). The racial makeup of the village was 98.74% White, 0.08% African American, 0.16% Native American, 0.16% Asian, 0.55% Pacific Islander, 0.16% from other races, and 0.16% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.94% of the population.

There were 508 households out of which 32.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.5% were married couples living together, 9.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.5% were non-families. 28.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 14.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.50 and the average family size was 3.06.

In the village, the population was spread out with 26.0% under the age of 18, 9.7% from 18 to 24, 27.7% from 25 to 44, 22.2% from 45 to 64, and 14.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 98.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.8 males.

The median income for a household in the village was $41,471, and the median income for a family was $48,676. Males had a median income of $34,219 versus $22,361 for females. The per capita income for the village was $17,600. About 2.8% of families and 3.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 5.2% of those under age 18 and 7.6% of those age 65 or over.

Cannonballs left from the battle are on display at the Fort

Notable people

References

  1. ^ a b "Village Officials". Archived from the original on 2010-09-19. Retrieved .
  2. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2012-07-02. Retrieved .
  3. ^ a b "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved .
  4. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved .
  5. ^ a b "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved 2019.
  6. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2013-09-11. Retrieved .
  7. ^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. Govt. Print. Off. p. 129.
  8. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved .
  9. ^ Hogeland, William (2017). Autumn of the Black Snake. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux. p. 374. ISBN 9780374107345. LCCN 2016052193.
  10. ^ Winkler, John F (2013). Fallen Timbers 1794: The US Army's first victory. Bloomsbury Publishing. p. 46. ISBN 978-1-7809-6377-8.
  11. ^ "Treaty of Greene Ville". Touring Ohio. Retrieved 2019.
  12. ^ Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis. "Consumer Price Index (estimate) 1800-". Retrieved 2020.
  13. ^ History of Van Wert and Mercer Counties Ohio. Wapakoneta, OH: R. Sutton & Co. 1882. p. 446.
  14. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Archived from the original on April 26, 2015. Retrieved 2015.

External links


  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

Fort_Recovery,_Ohio
 



 



 
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