Governor of Taiwan Province
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Governor of Taiwan Province
Taiwan Provincial Government

Táiw?n Sh?ng Zhèngf? (Mandarin)
Thòi-vân Sén Ch?n-fú (Hakka)
Taiwan Province Government emblem.svg
Seal of Taiwan Province
Agency overview
Formed1 September 1945 (as Office of the Chief Executive)
16 May 1947 (as Provincial Government)[1]
Preceding agency
Dissolved20 July 2018[2]
Superseding agency
JurisdictionTaiwan Province
Parent agencyExecutive Yuan
Websitewww.tpg.gov.tw
Taiwan Provincial Government
Traditional Chinese
Simplified Chinese

The Taiwan Provincial Government was the government that governed Taiwan Province of the Republic of China. Its functions have been transferred to the National Development Council and other ministries of the Executive Yuan.[3]

History

At the end of the World War II, Japan surrendered on August 15, 1945. The Nationalist government started the process to takeover Taiwan on behalf of the Allies. The Taiwan Provincial Administrative Office was established by the Executive Yuan in Chungking on September 1, 1945. The office moved to Taipei on October 25, 1945. After the February 28 incident in 1947, the Executive Yuan decided to restructure the Provincial Administrative Office as a provincial government. On May 16, 1947, the Taiwan Provincial Government was established.

The Republic of China progressively lost control of mainland China to Communist Party forces in the late 1940s and early 1950s and the national government relocated to Taiwan in 1950. However, Taiwan continued to be governed by a provincial government even though from 1955 it was one of only two provincial governments still functioning (the other being Fujian province, controlling some coastal islands). The remaining parts of Fujian province still under Republic of China control were placed under military administration 1956, and Fujian provincial government was downsized and relocated to Taiwan island. This left Taiwan province as the only fully functioning provincial government. From 1967, a number of major cities in Taiwan were elevated to special municipalities directly controlled by the national government, and moved outside the jurisdiction of Taiwan province.

Since 1998, the provincial government has been downsized and its major functions transferred to the Executive Yuan of the central government. The counties and cities under the province are administered directly by the central government since then.

In July 2018, all of its remaining duties and functions were transferred to the National Development Council and other ministries of the Executive Yuan.[4] However, the position of the Chairman of the Provincial Government is retained to comply with the Constitution.

Historical government buildings

Historically, before all its functionalities were handed to the Executive Yuan in July 2018. the provincial government was located in Taipei from 1947 to 1956, and in Zhongxing New Village from 1957 to July 2018.

Order First Second
Location Ch'êng-chung, Taipei City
(now Zhongzheng, Taipei)
Zhongxing New Village,
Nantou City, Nantou County
Date in use May 1947 to 1956 1957 to July 2018
Photo Executive Yuan 20050703.jpg Taiwan the Province Government Building.JPG
Notes Currently the Executive Yuan building Currently the Office of the Zhongxing New Village Revitalization Project, National Development Council

Governor of Taiwan

Official titles of the governor

Year Full title Literally Notes
Chinese Mandarin
(Pinyin)
Hokkien
(Pe?h-?e-j?)
1945-1947
?
Táiw?nsh?ng
Xíngzhèng
Zh?nggu?n
Tâi-oân-séng
Hêng-chèng
Tióng-Kua?
Chief Executive of
Taiwan Province
The position of Chief Executive was temporarily part of the Executive Yuan, the position was legalized in Taiwan Provincial Administrative Executive Office Organizational Outline (? Táiw?n-sh?ng xíngzhèng zh?nggu?n g?ngsh? z?zh? tiáolì) of September 20, 1945.
1947-1994
Táiw?nsh?ng
Zhèngf? Zh?xí
Tâi-oân-séng
Chèng-hú Chú-se?k
Chairman of Taiwan
Provincial Government
After the February 28 Incident, the Administrative Executive Office was reformed to a provincial government. The title often abbreviate as sh?ngzh?xí.
1994-1998
Táiw?nsh?ng
Sh?ngzh?ng
Tâi-oân-séng
Séng-tiú?
Governor of
Taiwan Province
During the democratic reforms, the title "Governor" was first legally used in the Self-Governance Law for Provinces and Counties () of July 29, 1994. The governor was directly elected by the people of the province.
1998-2018
Táiw?nsh?ng
Zhèngf? Zh?xí
Tâi-oân-séng
Chèng-hú Chú-se?k
Chairman of Taiwan
Provincial Government
Since the streamlining of the Taiwan Provincial Government in 1998, the government was headed by a provincial council of nine members, including one chairperson, all of which were appointed by the Taiwanese President. Since July 2018, there has been no council member or chairperson.

List of Governors

  Kuomintang   Non-partisan/ unknown   Democratic Progressive Party

Chief Executive

No Portrait Name
(Birth-Death)
Term of Office Political Party
1 Chen Yi.jpg Chen Yi

Chén Yí
(1883-1950)
August 29, 1945 April 22, 1947 Kuomintang

Chairperson of the Provincial Government

No Portrait Name
(Birth-Death)
Term of Office Political Party
1 Wei Daoming.jpg Wei Tao-ming

Wèi Dàomíng
(1899-1978)
May 16, 1947 January 5, 1949 Kuomintang
2 Chen Cheng.jpg Chen Cheng

Chén Chéng
(1897-1965)
January 5, 1949 December 21, 1949 Kuomintang
3 K. C. Wu 1950s 2.jpg K. C. Wu

Wú Guózh?n
(1903-1984)
December 21, 1949 April 16, 1953 Kuomintang
4 Yu Hung-Chun.jpg Yu Hung-chun

Yú Hóngj?n
(1897-1960)
April 16, 1953 June 7, 1954 Kuomintang
5 Yen Chia-kan 1965.jpg Yen Chia-kan
(C.K. Yen)


Yán Ji?gàn
(1905-1993)
June 7, 1954 August 16, 1957 Kuomintang
6 Zhou Zhirou.jpg Chow Chih-jou [zh]

Zh?u Zhìróu
(1899-1986)
August 16, 1957 December 1, 1962 Kuomintang
7 Army (ROCA) General Huang Chieh .jpg Huang Chieh

Huáng Jié
(1902-1995)
December 1, 1962 July 5, 1969 Kuomintang
8 Army (ROCA) General Chen Ta-ching ?.jpg Chen Ta-ching

Chén Dàqìng
(1904-1973)
July 5, 1969 June 6, 1972 Kuomintang
9 Hsieh Tung Ming.jpg Hsieh Tung-min

Xiè D?ngm?n
(1908-2001)
June 6, 1972 May 20, 1978 Kuomintang
-- Chu Shao-hwa [zh]

Qú Sháohuá
(1914-1996)
May 20, 1978 June 11, 1978 Kuomintang
As acting; Secretary General of the Provincial Government.
10 .jpg Lin Yang-kang

Lín Yángg?ng
(1927-2013)
June 12, 1978 December 5, 1981 Kuomintang
11 Lee Teng-hui 2004 cropped.jpg Lee Teng-hui

L? D?nghu?
(1923-)
December 5, 1981 May 20, 1984 Kuomintang
-- Liu Chao-tien

Liú Zhàotián
May 20, 1984 June 8, 1984 Kuomintang
As acting; Secretary General of the Provincial Government.
12 Encyclopedia of Law by Sanmin Books Chuang-huan Chiu.jpg Chiu Chuang-huan

Q?u Chuànghuàn
(1925-)
June 9, 1984 June 16, 1990 Kuomintang
13 2005KMT NanjingTour LienChan.jpg Lien Chan

Lián Zhàn
(1936-)
June 16, 1990 February 25, 1993[5] Kuomintang
-- Tu Teh-chi

Tú Déqí
February 27, 1993 March 19, 1993 Kuomintang
As acting; Secretary General of the Provincial Government.
14 James Soong cropped.png James Soong

Sòng Ch?yú
(1942-)
March 20, 1993 December 20, 1994 Kuomintang

Governor

No Portrait Name
(Birth-Death)
Term of Office Political Party
1 James Soong cropped.png James Soong

Sòng Ch?yú
(1942-)
December 20, 1994 December 21, 1998 Kuomintang

Chairperson of the Provincial Government[]

No Portrait Name
(Birth-Death)
Term of Office Political Party
15 2008TIBE Day5 Hall1 ActivityCenter1 Shou-po Chao.jpg Chao Shou-po

Zhào Sh?ubó
(1941-)
December 21, 1998 May 2, 2000 Kuomintang
-- Chiang Ching-hsien

Ji?ng Q?ngxi?n
May 2, 2000 May 19, 2000 Independent
As acting; Secretary General of the Provincial Government.
16 ? .jpg Chang Po-ya

Zh?ng Bóy?
(1942-)
May 20, 2000 February 1, 2002 Independent
First female chairperson. Concurrently held post of Minister of the Interior.
17 Fan Kuang-chun

Fàn Gu?ngqún
(1939-)
February 1, 2002 October 7, 2003 Democratic Progressive Party
18 Lin Kuang-hua

Lín Gu?nghuá
(1945-)
October 13, 2003 January 25, 2006 Democratic Progressive Party
-- Jeng Peir-fuh [zh]

Zhèng Péifù
January 25, 2006 December 7, 2007 Independent
As acting; Secretary General of the Provincial Government.
19 Lin Hsi-yao.jpg Lin Hsi-yao

Lín Xíyào
(1961-)
December 7, 2007 May 19, 2008 Democratic Progressive Party
Concurrently held post of Minister Without Portfolio.
20 Tsai Hsun-hsiung

Cài X?nxióng
(1941-)
May 20, 2008 September 10, 2009 Kuomintang
Concurrently held post of Minister Without Portfolio.
21 2008 WiMAX Expo Taipei Executive Yuan Chin-fu Chang.jpg Chang Jin-fu

Zh?ng Jìnfú
(1948-)
September 10, 2009 February 26, 2010 Independent
Concurrently held post of Minister Without Portfolio.
22 Lin Junq-tzer.jpg Lin Junq-tzer

Lín Zhèngzé
(1944-)
February 26, 2010 May 20, 2016 Kuomintang
Concurrently held post of Minister Without Portfolio.
23 Shih Jun-ji 20170908.jpg Shih Jun-ji

Sh? Jùnjí
(1955-)
May 20, 2016 June 30, 2016 Independent
Concurrently held post of Minister Without Portfolio. Shortest serving chairperson.
24 Hsu Chang-yao (cropped).jpg Hsu Jan-yau

X? Zhangyáo
(1951-)
July 1, 2016 November 5, 2017 Independent
Concurrently held post of Minister Without Portfolio.
25 Picture of (Wu Ze-cheng, sometimes Wu Tze-cheng) from the website of the Yilan County Government.jpg Wu Tze-cheng

Wú Zéchéng
(1945-)
November 6, 2017 June 30, 2018[] Independent
Concurrently held post of Minister Without Portfolio.

See also

References

  1. ^ ?. tpg.gov.tw. Retrieved .
  2. ^ ? (in Chinese). China Times. 2018-07-21.
  3. ^ "Taiwan Provincial Government Official Website". Retrieved 2018.
  4. ^ "Taiwan Provincial Government Official Website". Retrieved 2018.
  5. ^ ? [Past Chiefs]. tpg.gov.tw (in Chinese). Taiwan Provincial Gov't. Retrieved 2017.

External links


  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

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