Hayashi H%C5%8Dk%C5%8D
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Hayashi H%C5%8Dk%C5%8D
Hayashi H?k?
Hayashi H?k?, 1st rector of Yushima Seid?
Hayashi H?k?, 1st rector of Yushima Seid?
Born1644
Edo
Died1732
Edo
OccupationNeo-Confucian scholar, academic, administrator, writer
SubjectJapanese history, literature
ChildrenHayashi Ry?k?, son
RelativesHayashi Gah?, father
Hayashi Razan, grandfather

Hayashi H?k? (? , January 11, 1644 – July 22, 1732), also known as Hayashi Nobutatsu, was a Japanese Neo-Confucian scholar, teacher and administrator in the system of higher education maintained by the Tokugawa bakufu during the Edo period. He was a member of the Hayashi clan of Confucian scholars.

H?k? was the tutor of Tokugawa Tsuneyoshi.[1]

Following in the footsteps of his father, Hayashi Gah?, and his grandfather, Hayashi Razan, H?k? would be the arbiter of official neo-Confucian doctrine of the Tokugawa shogunate. As a result of his urging, the sh?gun invested Confucian scholars as samurai.[1]

Academician

H?k? was the third Hayashi clan Daigaku-no-kami of the Edo period. After 1691, H?k? is known as the first official rector of the Sh?hei-k? (afterwards known as the Yushima Seid?) which was built on land provided by the sh?gun.[1] This institution stood at the apex of the country-wide educational and training system which was created and maintained by the Tokugawa shogunate. Gah?'s hereditary title was Daigaku-no-kami, which, in the context of the Tokugawa shogunate hierarchy, effectively translates as "head of the state university.[2]

The scholars of the Hayashi school were taught to apply what they had learned from a Confucian curriculum. Typically, they applied the Confucian texts conservatively, relying on Soong Confucian anlayis and metaphysical teachings.[3]

The neo-Confucianist scholar Arai Hakuseki generally expressed scant regard for opinions expressed by Hayashi H?k?.[3]

Selected works

  • Kai hentai (Chinese Metamorphosis), reports of Chinese junks arriving in Nagasaki, 1640-1740.[4]

See also

Notes

  1. ^ a b c Nussbaum, Louis Frédéric et al. (2005). Japan Encyclopedia, p. 300.
  2. ^ De Bary, William et al. (2005). Sources of Japanese Tradition, Vol. 2, p. 443.
  3. ^ a b Arakai, James et al. (2008). Early Modern Japanese Literature: an Anthology, 1600-1900, p. 378 n12.
  4. ^ Tarling, Nicholas. (1998). The Cambridge History of Southeast Asia, Vol. 1, p. 161.

References

Flags mark the entrance to the reconstructed Yushima Seid? (Tokyo).
  • Arakai, James T. and Haruo Shirane. (2008). Early Modern Japanese Literature: an Anthology, 1600-1900 (abridged). New York: Columbia University Press. ISBN 978-0-231-10990-1/ISBN 978-0-231-10991-8/ISBN 978-0-231-14414-8/ISBN 978-0-231-144155; OCLC 255022419
  • De Bary, William Theodore, Carol Gluck, Arthur E. Tiedemann. (2005). Sources of Japanese Tradition, Vol. 2. New York: Columbia University Press. ISBN 9780231129848; OCLC 255020415
  • Nussbaum, Louis Frédéric and Käthe Roth. (2005). Japan Encyclopedia. Cambridge: Harvard University Press. ISBN 978-0-674-01753-5; OCLC 48943301
  • Tarling, Nicholas. (1998). The Cambridge History of Southeast Asia. Vol. 1. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 978-0-521-77864-0; ISBN 978-0-521-66369-4; ISBN 978-0-521-66370-0; ISBN 978-0-521-66371-7; ISBN 9780521663724; OCLC 43674066

External links

Preceded by
Hayashi Gah?
1st rector of Yushima Seid?
1691-1732
Succeeded by
Hayashi Ry?k?

  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

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