Irving Ben Cooper
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Irving Ben Cooper
Irving Ben Cooper
IrvingBenCooper.jpg
Senior Judge of the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York

February 7, 1972 - September 17, 1996
Judge of the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York

October 5, 1961 - February 7, 1972
John F. Kennedy
Seat established by 75 Stat. 80
Kevin Duffy
Personal details
Born
Irving Ben Cooper

(1902-02-07)February 7, 1902
London, England
DiedSeptember 17, 1996(1996-09-17) (aged 94)
New York City, New York
EducationWashington University School of Law (LL.B.)

Irving Ben Cooper (February 7, 1902 - September 17, 1996) was a United States District Judge of the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York.

Education and career

Born on February 7, 1902, in London, England, Cooper received a Bachelor of Laws in 1925 from Washington University School of Law. He entered private practice in New York City, New York from 1927 to 1938. He was special counsel for the New York City Department of Investigation from 1934 to 1937. He was a magistrate for New York City from 1938 to 1939. He was a Justice of the New York Court of Special Sessions from 1939 to 1960, serving as Chief Justice from 1951 to 1960. He was a Lecturer at the Menninger Foundation from 1960 to 1961.[1]

Federal judicial service

Cooper received a recess appointment from President John F. Kennedy on October 5, 1961, to the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York, to a new seat authorized by 75 Stat. 80. He was nominated to the same position by President Kennedy on January 15, 1962. He was confirmed by the United States Senate on September 20, 1962, and received his commission on September 28, 1962. He assumed senior status on February 7, 1972. His service terminated on September 17, 1996, due to his death in New York City.[1]

Nomination controversy

Cooper's nomination to the federal bench was controversial.[] Attorney General Herbert Brownell spoke out and said, "If there was ever a justice who was not deserving of this appointment, I submit it is Irving Ben Cooper."[]

Notable cases and judicial philosophy

In 1970, Cooper presided over a claim that organized baseball exerted a monopolistic hold on all major and minor league teams, and in 1982, a complaint filed by Jacqueline Onassis that a photographer was harassing her and her daughter, Caroline Kennedy.[] During his service as Chief Justice of the New York Court of Special Sessions, Cooper wrote yearly reports on the problems regarding the treatment of young offenders in the criminal justice system, asserting "It is not impossible for a sentence to be a greater injustice than the criminal act: equivalent to putting a child with a common cold into a smallpox ward for treatment."[]

References

External links

Legal offices
Preceded by
Seat established by 75 Stat. 80

1961-1972
Succeeded by
Kevin Duffy

  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

Irving_Ben_Cooper
 



 



 
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