Kenneth P. LaValle Stadium
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Kenneth P. LaValle Stadium
Kenneth P. LaValle Stadium
LaValle Stadium, Sep 2019.jpg
Former namesSeawolves Stadium (2002)
Location100 Nicolls Road
Stony Brook, NY 11794
Coordinates40°55?08?N 73°07?27?W / 40.91889°N 73.12417°W / 40.91889; -73.12417Coordinates: 40°55?08?N 73°07?27?W / 40.91889°N 73.12417°W / 40.91889; -73.12417
OwnerStony Brook University
OperatorStony Brook University
Capacity10,300 (2002-16)
12,300 (2017-present)
SurfaceFieldTurf
Construction
Broke groundOctober 25, 1999[1]
OpenedSeptember 14, 2002
Construction cost$22 million
($31.3 million in 2019 dollars[2])
ArchitectDattner Architects
Structural engineerSeverud Associates[3]
Services engineerHenderson Engineers, Inc.[4]
General contractorThe Tyree Organization[5]
Tenants
Stony Brook Seawolves (NCAA) (2002-present)

The Kenneth P. LaValle Stadium is the main stadium for Stony Brook University in Stony Brook, New York, United States. Construction began in 2000 at a cost of approximately $22 million.[6] With a capacity of 12,300 people (10,300 seating and 2,000 standing),[7] it is the largest outdoor facility in Suffolk County.[8] The stadium is home to the Division I Stony Brook Seawolves and their football, men's soccer, women's soccer, men's lacrosse, and women's lacrosse teams.[8]

The stadium opened on September 14, 2002. It was named in honor of New York state senator Kenneth LaValle on October 19, 2002. LaValle played a key role in the development and creation of the stadium.[8] The stadium consists of a three-tier press box on the east side, as well as six luxury suites, a press box, television and radio booths, and a camera deck on the roof.[8] Its most recent expansion came in 2017, with the addition of 2,000 seats in the north end zone and a new concessions and restrooms facility.

History

Seawolves Stadium opened on September 14, 2002 as the Stony Brook Seawolves football team faced the St. John's Red Storm in Stony Brook's first game as a Division I program.[9] Stony Brook won 34-9, and the opening kickoff was returned for a touchdown by the Seawolves.[10] At the time of its opening, the 8,136-seat stadium was the largest in Suffolk County, a record that is still held today.[11]

On October 19, 2002, the date of Stony Brook's Homecoming game against Sacred Heart, the stadium was renamed the Kenneth P. LaValle Stadium in honor of New York state senator Kenneth P. LaValle, a key figure in the development and creation of the $22 million facility.[12] Before its opening, the Stony Brook Director of Marketing and Promotions for Athletics had opened up the possibility of renaming the stadium for a corporate partnership or a former president of Stony Brook University.[13]

The stadium's name has been the subject of numerous controversies, including in 2009 after LaValle voted against the legalization of gay marriage in New York and in 2019 when LaValle voted against a ban on gay conversion therapy.[14][15]

A sold-out crowd of 10,024 watched the 2010 NCAA Division I Men's Lacrosse Championship quarterfinals at LaValle Stadium, where No. 8-seeded Stony Brook fell 10-9 to No. 1-seeded Virginia, falling one goal short of the Final Four.[16]

In October 2012, Stony Brook University allocated $5.7 million for the addition of at least 2,000 seats to LaValle Stadium, bringing the seating capacity from 8,300 to 10,300, with a standing capacity of 2,000 bringing the stadium's total capacity to 12,300.[17]

LaValle Stadium in 2019

New York governor Andrew Cuomo vetoed a $22 million upgrade to the stadium in 2015, money which was originally allocated for a "computational biomedicine visualization and drug development magnet facility." The Senate had attempted to change the usage of the funds in the state budget as the intended programs no longer existed.[18]

The front entrance of LaValle Stadium.

An expansion was completed in the summer of 2017 and added 2,000 seats in the north end zone, as well as a new concessions and restrooms facility.[19] Before the 2018 season, a new turf field was installed in LaValle Stadium, also adding red end zones and a new midfield logo.[20]

LaValle Stadium was set to host three games of the 2020 Premier Lacrosse League (PLL) season, including a nationally televised game on NBC in June, but due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the league held its season in a bubble in Utah instead.[21][22]

Attendance records

The most attended game in Kenneth P. LaValle Stadium history occurred on October 5, 2019, when 12,812 showed up for a Homecoming game against James Madison in which Stony Brook lost, 45-38, in overtime.[23]

Highest attendance at Kenneth P. LaValle Stadium
Rank Attendance Date Game result
1 12,812 Oct. 5, 2019* Stony Brook 38, James Madison 45 (OT)
2 12,701 Oct. 20, 2018* Stony Brook 52, Rhode Island 14
3 12,311 Oct. 14, 2017* Stony Brook 38, New Hampshire 24
4 12,221 Oct. 15, 2016* Stony Brook 14, Rhode Island 3
5 12,177 Oct. 17, 2015* Stony Brook 14, Towson 21
6 11,301 Sept. 27, 2014* Stony Brook 21, William & Mary 27 (OT)
7 11,224 Oct. 5, 2013* Stony Brook 21, Bryant 13
8 10,278 Sept. 22, 2012* Stony Brook 32, Colgate 31
9 10,252 Aug. 28, 2014 Stony Brook 7, Bryant 13
10 10,024 May 23, 2010 Virginia 10, Stony Brook 9 [lacrosse]

Asterisks indicate Homecoming games.

See also

References

  1. ^ "September 14, 2002: New Era for Stony Brook Football" (Press release). Stony Brook University Department of Athletics. January 15, 2002. Retrieved 2018.
  2. ^ Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis. "Consumer Price Index (estimate) 1800-". Retrieved 2020.
  3. ^ "Projects". Severud Associates. Archived from the original on January 4, 2013. Retrieved 2012.
  4. ^ "Sports/Recreation". Henderson Engineers, Inc. Retrieved 2014.
  5. ^ "Kenneth P. Lavelle Stadium". Prestressed Concrete Institute. Retrieved 2012.
  6. ^ "Kenneth P. LaValle Stadium at Stony Brook University". Discover Long Island. Retrieved .
  7. ^ "Kenneth P. LaValle Stadium". Stony Brook University Department of Athletics. August 25, 2016. Retrieved 2017.
  8. ^ a b c d "Kenneth P. LaValle Stadium". Stony Brook University Athletics. Retrieved .
  9. ^ "The Waiting Is Over. The Stage Is Set. The Curtain Opens On Seawolves Stadium Saturday Night". Stony Brook University Athletics. Retrieved .
  10. ^ "Stony Brook Opens Seawolves Stadium With 34-9 Thrilling Victory Over St. John's". Stony Brook University Athletics. Retrieved .
  11. ^ "Fans Say Stadium Is About 'Us'". Stony Brook University Athletics. Retrieved .
  12. ^ "Homecoming Showdown: Sacred Heart vs. Stony Brook". Stony Brook University Athletics. Retrieved .
  13. ^ Solnik, Claude (2002-08-02). "Seawolves Stadium nearly ready at Stony Brook". Long Island Business News. Retrieved .
  14. ^ Kilb, Sam (2009-12-09). "Campaign To Rename Stadium Picking Up Steam". The Statesman. Retrieved .
  15. ^ Staff, T. B. R. "Stony Brook University students petition to change LaValle Stadium's name | TBR News Media". Retrieved .
  16. ^ "Stony Brook Extends Contract of Head Lacrosse Coach Rick Sowell". Stony Brook University Athletics. Retrieved .
  17. ^ Sampson, Christine (October 15, 2012). "Officials: $5.7M Allocated for Future LaValle Stadium Expansion". Patch. Retrieved 2018.
  18. ^ lovett, ken. "Gov. Cuomo set to veto $22.2M pork project for Sen. Kenneth LaValle Stadium - NY Daily News". nydailynews.com. Retrieved .
  19. ^ "Together We Transform Thursday: Jan. 5, 2017". Stony Brook University Athletics. Retrieved .
  20. ^ Sleter, Greg. "Stony Brook Installs New Turf Field Ahead Of Fall Season". SleterFC.com. Retrieved .
  21. ^ "SBU to host three Premier Lacrosse League games". Newsday. Retrieved .
  22. ^ Baker, Katie (2020-07-31). "How the Premier Lacrosse League Built Its Bubble Tournament". The Ringer. Retrieved .
  23. ^ https://stonybrookathletics.com/news/2019/10/5/football-24th-ranked-seawolves-force-overtime-but-fall-in-battle-with-no-2-james-madison.aspx. Retrieved . Missing or empty |title= (help)

External links


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