Kim Eun-ha
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Kim Eun-ha
Kim Eun-ha
(? )
Country (sports) South Korea
Born (1975-03-08) 8 March 1975 (age 47)
South Korea
Height1.73 m (5 ft 8 in)
Retired2003
PlaysRight-handed
Prize money$182,957
Singles
Career record171-139
Career titles0 WTA, 8 ITF
Highest rankingNo. 141 (26 October 1998)
Doubles
Career record127-94
Career titles0 WTA, 15 ITF
Highest rankingNo. 84 (27 July 1998)
Grand Slam doubles results
Australian Open2R (1998)
French Open1R (1998, 1999)
Wimbledon2R (1998)
US Open2R (1998)

Kim Eun-ha (born 8 March 1975) is a former professional tennis player from South Korea. A right-handed player, Kim had a serve-and-volley game and was best on hard courts.

Biography

Early life

Kim was born in 1975, one of three daughters of fisherman Young-Soo and housewife Chung In-ja. She began playing tennis while at school at the age of 10 and graduated in 1994, after which she joined the professional tour.[1]

Professional tour

Kim made the singles quarterfinals of the 1997 Danamon Open in Jakarta as a qualifier. Her performances in 1997 brought her ranking into the top 200 and she peaked at 141 in 1998. She won ITF singles titles in Seoul and Shenzhen during her career.

It was in doubles that she had the most success. After winning four ITF doubles events in 1997, Kim appeared in the main draw of all four Grand Slam events in the 1998 season and reached 84 in the world that year. One of those Grand Slam tournaments was the US Open where she and Virág Csurgó beat the American pairing of Jennifer Capriati and Alexandra Stevenson.[2] On the WTA Tour she twice made doubles semi-finals, with Émilie Loit at the 1998 Skoda Czech Open and Jeon Mi-ra in 2001 at the Pattaya Open.

Representative

Kim made her first appearances for the South Korea Fed Cup team in 1995 and was a regular fixture in the side throughout the campaign.

At the 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta, Kim was a member of the South Korean squad and featured in the women's doubles draw, with Park Sung-hee. The pair were beaten in the first round by South Africa's Amanda Coetzer and Mariaan De Swardt.[3]

In 1997, South Korea competed in the Fed Cup World Group, having qualified for the first time by beating Bulgaria in the 1996 play-off. Her win over Bulgaria's Antoaneta Pandjerova in the fourth rubber of the play-off had the distinction of securing the World Group spot for South Korea. Their 1997 World Group tie was against Argentina in Seoul and they were beaten 1-4, with Kim losing both a singles and doubles match in three sets.

Her appearances in international competition for South Korea include the 1998 Asian Games and 2001 Summer Universiade. At the Universiade, which was held in Beijing, she won two medals, a silver in the women's doubles and a bronze in the mixed doubles.

ITF Circuit finals

$100,000 tournaments
$75,000 tournaments
$50,000 tournaments
$25,000 tournaments
$10,000 tournaments

Singles (8-4)

Outcome No. Date Tournament Surface Opponent Score
Winner 1. 6 June 1994 Seoul, South Korea Hard South Korea Choi Young-ja 6-3, 7-5
Winner 2. 19 December 1994 Manila, Philippines Hard China Yi Jing-Qian 6-1, 6-4
Runner-up 3. 8 May 1995 Seoul, South Korea Clay South Korea Choi Ju-yeon 4-6, 5-7
Winner 4. 29 May 1995 Seoul, South Korea Hard South Korea Choi Young-ja 6-2, 6-2
Winner 5. 5 June 1995 Seoul, South Korea Hard Japan Madoka Kuki 6-2, 6-1
Winner 6. 6 May 1996 Seoul, South Korea Clay South Korea Choi Young-ja 2-6, 6-2, 6-3
Runner-up 7. 3 November 1997 Beijing, China Hard China Yi Jing-Qian 3-6, 5-7
Winner 8. 26 April 1998 Shenzhen, China Hard China Yi Jing-Qian 6-3, 6-1
Runner-up 9. 18 October 1998 Indian Wells, United States Hard Bulgaria Pavlina Nola 3-6, 4-6
Runner-up 10. 14 May 2000 Seoul, South Korea Clay China Li Na 3-6, 6-7(1-7)
Winner 11. 4 June 2000 Shenzhen, China Hard China Sun Tiantian 6-4, 6-3
Winner 12. 29 April 2001 Seoul, South Korea Hard China Yi Jing-Qian 6-4, 6-2

Doubles (15-7)

Outcome No. Date Tournament Surface Partner Opponents Score
Winner 1. 12 December 1994 Manila, Philippines Hard South Korea Choi Ju-yeon Japan Keiko Ishida
South Korea Park In-sook
6-3, 6-4
Winner 2. 20 March 1995 Bandar, Brunei Hard South Korea Choi Ju-yeon South Korea Kim Soon-nam
South Korea Kim Ih-sook
6-4, 6-0
Winner 3. 8 May 1995 Seoul, South Korea Clay South Korea Choi Ju-yeon Japan Keiko Ishida
Japan Mami Donoshiro
6-3, 6-3
Winner 4. 22 May 1995 Beijing, China Hard South Korea Kim Ih-sook Philippines Francesca La'O
Chinese Taipei Weng Tzu-ting
6-2, 6-3
Winner 5. 29 May 1995 Seoul, South Korea Clay South Korea Kim Ih-sook South Korea Choi Jin
South Korea Choi Young-ja
6-4, 7-5
Winner 6. 5 May 1997 Seoul, South Korea Clay South Korea Cho Yoon-jeong South Korea Choi Young-ja
South Korea Park Sung-hee
6-3, 7-6(8-6)
Winner 7. 4 August 1997 Jakarta, Indonesia Clay South Korea Choi Young-ja Australia Kerry-Anne Guse
Australia Kristine Kunce
6-3, 6-4
Winner 8. 15 September 1997 Taipei, Taiwan Hard South Korea Choi Young-ja Australia Kerry-Anne Guse
Australia Catherine Barclay
1-6, 6-4, 6-3
Winner 9. 10 November 1997 Mount Gambier, Australia Hard Australia Catherine Barclay Australia Renee Reid
Hungary Réka Vidáts
6-3, 6-2
Winner 10. 26 April 1998 Shenzhen, China Hard Australia Catherine Barclay Australia Gail Biggs
Japan Tomoe Hotta
6-3, 6-2
Runner-up 11. 25 October 1998 Houston, United States Hard Japan Rika Hiraki United States Nana Smith
Japan Miho Saeki
1-6, 6-4, 1-6
Runner-up 12. 9 August 1999 Lexington, United States Hard United Kingdom Julie Pullin France Alexandra Fusai
Argentina Florencia Labat
4-6, 1-6
Winner 13. 3 October 1999 Seoul, South Korea Hard Australia Catherine Barclay Thailand Tamarine Tanasugarn
South Korea Park Sung-hee
4-6, 6-4, 6-2
Runner-up 14. 4 October 1999 Saga, Japan Grass Slovenia Petra Rampre 7-6, 3-6, 2-6
Winner 15. 4 June 2000 Shenzhen, China Hard Japan Saori Obata China Li Na
China Li Ting
6-1, 6-3
Runner-up 16. 25 March 2001 La Cañada, United States Hard Japan Rika Hiraki United Kingdom Julie Pullin
United Kingdom Lorna Woodroffe
2-6, 4-6
Winner 17. 29 April 2001 Seoul, South Korea Hard Indonesia Wynne Prakusya Germany Angelika Bachmann
Hungary Adrienn Heged?s
6-3, 6-2
Winner 18. 6 May 2001 Gifu, Japan Carpet Indonesia Wynne Prakusya United Kingdom Julie Pullin
United Kingdom Lorna Woodroffe
1-6, 6-4, 7-6(7-2)
Runner-up 19. 16 September 2001 Seoul, South Korea Hard Japan Rika Hiraki South Korea Choi Young-ja
South Korea Kim Eun-sook
3-6, 3-6
Runner-up 20. 18 November 2001 Port Pirie, Australia Hard South Korea Jeon Mi-ra Australia Lisa McShea
Australia Trudi Musgrave
5-7, 4-6
Winner 21. 25 February 2002 New Delhi, India Hard South Korea Choi Young-ja Czech Republic Eva Birnerová
Czech Republic Jana Hlavá?ková
6-7(4-7), 6-4, 6-3
Runner-up 22. 16 November 2003 Manila, Philippines Hard South Korea Kim Ji-young Indonesia Wynne Prakusya
Indonesia Maya Rosa
6-2, 0-6, 4-6

References

  1. ^ "Bio - Personal". WTA Tour. Retrieved 2017.
  2. ^ "Scoreboard". Philadelphia Daily News. 4 September 1998. p. 126. Retrieved 2017.
  3. ^ "Kim Eun-Ha Bio, Stats, and Results". Olympics at Sports-Reference.com. Archived from the original on 17 April 2020. Retrieved 2017.

External links


  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

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