Lamiids
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Lamiids

Oregano from Lamiales

In the APG IV system (2016) for the classification of flowering plants, the name asterids denotes a clade (a monophyletic group).[1] Common examples include the forget-me-nots, nightshades (including potatoes, eggplants, tomatoes, peppers and tobacco), the common sunflower, petunias, morning glory and sweet potato, coffee, lavender, lilac, olive, jasmine, honeysuckle, ash tree, teak, snapdragon, sesame, psyllium, garden sage, table herbs such as mint, basil, and rosemary, and rainforest trees such as Brazil nut.

Most of the taxa belonging to this clade had been referred to the Asteridae in the Cronquist system (1981) and to the Sympetalae in earlier systems.[] The name asterids (not necessarily capitalised) resembles the earlier botanical name but is intended to be the name of a clade rather than a formal ranked name, in the sense of the ICBN.

History

Genetic analysis carried out after APG II maintains that the sister to all other asterids are the Cornales. A second order that split from the base of the asterids are the Ericales. The remaining orders cluster into two clades, the lamiids and the campanulids. The structure of both of these clades has changed in APG III.[2][3]

In the APG III system, the following clades were renamed:

euasterids I -> lamiids
euasterids II -> campanulids[2][3]

Phylogeny

The phylogenetic tree presented hereafter has been proposed by the APG IV project.[1]


asterids 

 Cornales

 Ericales

euasterids
campanulids

Aquifoliales

Asterales

Escalloniales

Bruniales

Apiales

Dipsacales

Paracryphiales

lamiids

Icacinales

Metteniusales

Garryales

Boraginales

Gentianales

Vahliales

Lamiales

Solanales

Subdivision

lamiids

The lamiid subclade consists of about 40,000 species and account for about 15% of angiosperm diversity, characterized in general by superior ovaries and corollas with late sympetaly. The major part of lamiid diversity occurs in the group of five orders from Boraginales to Solanales, referred to informally as "core lamiids" (sometimes called Laminae), although Vahliales consists of the single small genus Vahlia. The remainder of the lamiids are referred to as "basal lamiids", in which Garryales is the sister group to the core lamiids. It has been suggested that the core lamiids radiated from an ancestral line of tropical trees in which the flowers were inconspicuous and the fruit large, drupaceous and often single-seeded.[4]

References

  1. ^ a b Angiosperm Phylogeny Group (2016). "An update of the Angiosperm Phylogeny Group classification for the orders and families of flowering plants: APG IV". Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society. 181 (1): 1-20. doi:10.1111/boj.12385.
  2. ^ a b Angiosperm Phylogeny Group (2003). "An update of the Angiosperm Phylogeny Group classification for the orders and families of flowering plants: APG II". Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society. 141 (4): 399-436. doi:10.1046/j.1095-8339.2003.t01-1-00158.x.
  3. ^ a b Angiosperm Phylogeny Group (2009). "An update of the Angiosperm Phylogeny Group classification for the orders and families of flowering plants: APG III". Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society. 161 (2): 105-121. doi:10.1111/j.1095-8339.2009.00996.x.
  4. ^ Stull et al 2015.

Bibliography

External links


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Lamiids
 



 



 
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