Later Yan
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Later Yan
Later Yan ()

?
384-409
Later Yan in 391 AD
Later Yan in 391 AD
Later Yan in 398 AD
Later Yan in 398 AD
CapitalZhongshan (386-397)
Longcheng (397-409)
GovernmentMonarchy
Emperor 
o 384-396
Murong Chui
o 396-398
Murong Bao
o 398
Lan Han
o 398-401
Murong Sheng
o 401-407
Murong Xi
o 407-409
Murong Yun
History 
o Established
384
o Establishment of Zhongshan as capital
8 February 386[1][2]
Murong Chui's claim of imperial title
15 February 386[2][3]
o Evacuation of Zhongshan
27 April 397[4][5]
Murong Xi's death
16 September 407[6][7]
o Disestablished
6 November[8][9] 409
Today part ofChina

The Later Yan (simplified Chinese: ; traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: Hòuyàn; 384-407 or 409) was a Murong-Xianbei state, located in modern-day northeast China, during the era of Sixteen Kingdoms in China.[10]

All rulers of the Later Yan declared themselves "emperors".

Rulers of the Later Yan

Temple names Posthumous names Family names and given name Durations of reigns Era names and their according durations
Shizu () Wucheng () Murong Chui 384-396 Yanwang () 384-386
Jianxing () 386-396
Liezong () Huimin () Murong Bao 396-398 Yongkang () 396-398
- - Lan Han 398 Qinglong (/) 398
Zhongzong () Zhaowu () Murong Sheng 398-401 Jianping () 398
Changle () 399-401
- Zhaowen () Murong Xi 401-407 Guangshi () 401-406
Jianshi () 407
- Huiyi () Murong Yun1
or Gao Yun1
407-409 Zhengshi () 407-409
1 The family name of Gao Yun was changed to Murong when he was adopted by the royal family. If Gao Yun was counted as a ruler of the Later Yan, the state would end in 409. It ended in 407 otherwise.

See also

References

  1. ^ "?". www.sinica.edu.tw.
  2. ^ a b Zizhi Tongjian, vol. 106.
  3. ^ "?". www.sinica.edu.tw.
  4. ^ "?". www.sinica.edu.tw.
  5. ^ Zizhi Tongjian, vol. 109.
  6. ^ "?". www.sinica.edu.tw.
  7. ^ Zizhi Tongjian, vol. 114.
  8. ^ "?". www.sinica.edu.tw.
  9. ^ Zizhi Tongjian, vol. 115.
  10. ^ Grousset, Rene (1970). The Empire of the Steppes. Rutgers University Press. p. 59. ISBN 0-8135-1304-9.

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