Laureus Sport For Good Award
Get Laureus Sport For Good Award essential facts below. View Videos or join the Laureus Sport For Good Award discussion. Add Laureus Sport For Good Award to your PopFlock.com topic list for future reference or share this resource on social media.
Laureus Sport For Good Award

Laureus Sport for Good Award
Awarded for"tremendous contribution to sport or to society through sport".[1]
LocationMonaco (2019)[2]
Presented byLaureus Sport for Good Foundation
First awarded2000
Currently held byYuwa (IND)[2]
WebsiteOfficial website

The Laureus Sport for Good Award is an award honouring the achievements of those who have demonstrated "tremendous contribution to sport or to society through sport".[1] It was first awarded in 2000 as one of the inaugural awards presented during the Laureus World Sports Awards.[1] The awards are presented by the Laureus Sport for Good Foundation, a global organisation involved in more than 150 charity projects supporting 500,000 young people.[3] The first ceremony was held on 25 May 2000 in Monte Carlo, at which Nelson Mandela gave the keynote speech.[4] The recipient is presented with a Laureus statuette, created by Cartier, at an annual awards ceremony held in various locations around the world.[5] Although the Laureus Awards ceremony is held annually, the Sport for Good Award is not necessarily presented every time; it is one of a number of discretionary awards that can be given by the Laureus World Sports Academy.[1]

The inaugural winner of the Laureus Sport for Good Award in 2000 was American Eunice Kennedy Shriver. The summer camp which she started in her back yard in 1962 became the Special Olympics and she was described by CNN's Emanuella Grinberg as "an advocate for the disenfranchised and a trailblazer for the rights of the disabled".[6] The 2004 award was shared: Kenyan cricket organisation Mathare Youth Sports Association received it along with both the India and Pakistan national cricket teams. As of 2017, one individual has been honoured posthumously. Peter Blake, the New Zealand yachtsman, was shot dead by pirates on the Amazon River in December 2001.[7] Since its establishment, the award has not been awarded twice, in 2009 and 2013. It has been presented to organisations or individuals from Kenya and the United States on the most occasions, with three awards for each nation. The 2019 recipient of the Laureus Sport for Good Award was "Yuwa", a north-India organisation which "uses football to empower young girls in rural Jharkhand to overcome violence and child marriage and choose their own futures".[8]

Recipients

Key
dagger Indicates posthumous award
Year Image Winner Nationality Notes Ref(s)
2000 Eunice Kennedy Shriver Eunice Kennedy Shriver  USA Founder of Camp Shriver which became the Special Olympics [9]
2001 Kip Keino in 2014 Kip Keino  KEN Former athlete, and two-time Olympic gold medallist who has conducted humanitarian work in Eldoret, Kenya [10]
2002 - Peter Blake dagger  NZL Yachtsman who was killed on the Amazon River by pirates [11]
2003 Arnold Schwarzenegger in 1974 Arnold Schwarzenegger  USA Former body-builder closely involved with the Special Olympics - his former mother-in-law was founder Eunice Kennedy Shriver [12]
2004 India and Pakistan flags India and Pakistan men's cricket teams  IND
 PAK
After being on the brink of war, India and Pakistan relations improved through the game of cricket. [13][14]
- Mathare Youth Sports Association (MYSA)  KEN Using cricket, the MYSA helps combat the widespread disease and drug abuse in Mathare area of Kenya. [13][15]
2005 - Gerry Storey  GBR Boxing trainer who spent his lifetime's work running the Holy Family Gym throughout The Troubles [16]
2006 - Jürgen Griesbeck  GER Founder of the "streetfootballworld" project which assists underpriviliged children around the world [17]
2007 - Luke Dowdney  GBR Creator of "Fight for Peace" project in Rio de Janeiro [18]
2008 - Brendan Tuohey and Sean Tuohey  USA Co-founders of Peace Players International project [19]
2009 No award [20]
2010 Dikembe Mutombo in 2012 Dikembe Mutombo  COD Former NBA player, engaged in charitable work in the Democratic Republic of the Congo [21]
2011 May El-Khalil in 2010 May El-Khalil  LBN Former athlete, founder of Beirut Marathon [22]
2012 Raí in 2009 Raí  BRA Former Brazilian footballer, campaigner for social justice [23]
2013 No award [24]
2014 - Magic Bus  IND Mentors and coaches underprivileged children in India [25][26]
2015 - Skateistan  AFG Cambodian youth organisation which uses skateboarding as a way of engaging children with education [27][28]
2016 - Moving the Goalposts  KEN Uses football to empower girls in Kilifi, Kenya, while educating them about sex tourism and AIDS/HIV [29][30]
2017 - Waves for Change  RSA Surfing therapy for children from the townships of South Africa [31][32]
2018 - Active Communities Network  GBR Uses sport and cultural activity to promote "community cohesion and tackle youth crime" in London [33]
2019 - Yuwa  IND An "organisation which uses football to empower young girls in rural Jharkhand to overcome violence and child marriage" [8]

References

  1. ^ a b c d "The awards". Laureus. Archived from the original on 18 March 2017. Retrieved 2017.
  2. ^ a b "Laureus World Sports Awards: Simone Biles and Novak Djokovic win top honours". BBC. 18 February 2019. Archived from the original on 18 February 2019. Retrieved 2019.
  3. ^ Snook, Ian (20 April 2016). "It's more than just an award". Taranaki Daily News. Retrieved 2017 – via Stuff.co.nz.
  4. ^ Sugden, John; Tomlinson, Alan (30 April 2017). Sport and Peace-Building in Divided Societies: Playing with Enemies. Taylor and Francis. p. 163. ISBN 1-136-29233-0. Archived from the original on 18 October 2017.
  5. ^ "Did you know?". Laureus. Archived from the original on 18 March 2017. Retrieved 2017.
  6. ^ Grinberg, Emanuella (11 August 2009). "Eunice Kennedy Shriver dies at 88". CNN. Retrieved 2017.
  7. ^ Bellos, Alex; Fisher, Bob (7 December 2001). "Peter Blake, the world's leading sailor, shot dead in attack by Amazon pirates". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 10 March 2017. Retrieved 2017.
  8. ^ a b "Arsène Wenger announces the 2019 Laureus Sport for Good Award Winner". Laureus. 17 February 2019. Retrieved 2019.
  9. ^ Swart, Sharon (15 May 2001). "Good sports". Variety. Archived from the original on 7 November 2017. Retrieved 2017.
  10. ^ Wirz, Jurg (7 April 2006). Run to Win: The Training Secrets of the Kenyan Runners. Meyer & Meyer. p. 119. ISBN 1-84126-188-2. Archived from the original on 7 November 2017. Retrieved 2017.
  11. ^ "Blake awarded two Laureus Awards". CNN. 15 May 2002. Archived from the original on 23 October 2017. Retrieved 2017.
  12. ^ "Laureus Sports Awards: Armstrong on top". The Daily Telegraph. 21 May 2003. Archived from the original on 29 February 2016. Retrieved 2017.
  13. ^ a b "Key facts" (pdf). Laureus. p. 4. Archived (PDF) from the original on 9 March 2016. Retrieved 2017.
  14. ^ "India & Pakistan Cricket Teams". Laureus. Retrieved 2017.
  15. ^ "Mathare Association - Sport for Good - 2004". Laureus. Retrieved 2017.
  16. ^ "Storey picks up world sport award". BBC Sport. 17 May 2005. Retrieved 2017.
  17. ^ "Jürgen Griesbeck". Laureus. Archived from the original on 8 September 2015. Retrieved 2017.
  18. ^ Dirs, Ben. "Fight for Peace, create champions". BBC Sport. Archived from the original on 6 May 2008. Retrieved 2017.
  19. ^ "Federer wins record fourth Laureus Sports Awards". China Daily. 19 February 2008. Archived from the original on 7 November 2017. Retrieved 2017.
  20. ^ "Winners - 2009". Laureus. Archived from the original on 18 October 2015. Retrieved 2017.
  21. ^ "Mutombo Honored by Laureus in Abu Dhabi". National Basketball Association. 10 March 2010. Archived from the original on 1 December 2010. Retrieved 2017.
  22. ^ "Rafael Nadal and Lindsey Vonn win Laureus awards". BBC Sport. 7 February 2011. Retrieved 2017.
  23. ^ Chadband, Ian (6 February 2012). "Darren Clarke and Rory McIlroy savour Irish double at Laureus World Sports Awards". The Daily Telegraph. Archived from the original on 29 January 2017. Retrieved 2017.
  24. ^ "Winners - 2013". Laureus. Archived from the original on 16 May 2016. Retrieved 2017.
  25. ^ "Indian NGO Magic Bus gets recognition at Laureus awards". The Times of India. PTI. 27 March 2014. Archived from the original on 25 May 2015. Retrieved 2017.
  26. ^ "Magic Bus project wins Laureus Sport for Good Award". Laureus. 26 March 2014. Retrieved 2017.
  27. ^ Thorpe, Holly; Olive, Rebecca, eds. (21 November 2016). Women in Action Sport Cultures: Identity, Politics and Experience. Palgrave Macmillan. p. 141. ISBN 1-137-45796-1. Archived from the original on 7 November 2017.
  28. ^ "Skateistan - Project overview". Laureus. Retrieved 2017.
  29. ^ Agutu, Nancy (19 April 2016). "Kenyan Rachel Muthoga receives 'Sport For Good' award in Berlin". The Star. Nairobi. Reuters. Archived from the original on 25 June 2016. Retrieved 2017.
  30. ^ "Moving the Goalposts - Project overview". Laureus. Retrieved 2017.
  31. ^ "Laureus Awards 2017: Bolt, Biles, Rosberg, Atherton & Leicester among winners". BBC Sport. 14 February 2017. Archived from the original on 8 June 2017. Retrieved 2017.
  32. ^ "Wave for Change - Project overview". Laureus. Retrieved 2017.
  33. ^ "Active Communities Network (Urban Stars London)". Laureus. Retrieved 2018.


  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

Laureus_Sport_for_Good_Award
 



 



 
Music Scenes