Libertarian Party of New Mexico
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Libertarian Party of New Mexico

Libertarian Party of New Mexico
AbbreviationLPNM
ChairmanChris Luchini
FoundedJune 27, 1972; 48 years ago (1972-06-27)
Membership11,420
IdeologyLibertarianism
Senate
House of Representatives
U.S. Senate
U.S. House of Representatives
Website
lpnm.us

The Libertarian Party of New Mexico is the New Mexico affiliate of the Libertarian Party. Since 2016, the Libertarian Party of New Mexico has been qualified as a major party in New Mexico. In 2018, the party became the first Libertarian Party to have a statewide officeholder when Public Lands Commissioner Aubrey Dunn Jr. switched his partisan affiliation from Republican to Libertarian.

History

1970s

On June 27, 1972, the Libertarian Party of New Mexico filed its articles of incorporation with the New Mexico Corporation Commission. Diana Amsden, Maurice McDonald, and Sidney Light were listed as the original directors.[1] On July 22, the party held its first state convention where seven people were selected to serve on its executive committee and a political platform was approved.[2][3]

On September 1, 1978, Bob Walsh filed a lawsuit in the U.S. District Court against County Clerk Emma C. Gonzales so that he could be placed onto the ballot for the New Mexico House of Representatives from the 22nd district. Assistant County Attorney John J. Carmody Jr. had advised Gonzales not to place Walsh onto the ballot as New Mexico law required political parties to file their party rules with the county clerk within thirty days after the party organization was formed, which the Libertarians did not do, and that the Libertarian Party did not have a process for nominating legislative office candidates in single county districts.[4] On September 8, District Judge Phillip Baiamonte ruled against Walsh.[5] Walsh appealed to the New Mexico Supreme Court, but the Supreme Court ruled against him.[6]

1980s

In 1983, Senate Bill 352, which would reduce the required number of signatures to appear on the election ballot from 3% of the total votes cast in the most recent presidential or gubernatorial election to 1% of the total votes cast in the most recent presidential or gubernatorial election, was introduced at the request of the Libertarian Party of New Mexico.[7] The legislation passed in the New Mexico Senate and New Mexico House of Representatives.[8] On April 7, Governor Toney Anaya signed the legislation into law.[9]

2010s

In 2016, the Libertarian presidential nominee, former New Mexico Governor Gary Johnson, received over 9% of the popular vote in the presidential election in New Mexico. By receiving over 5% of the popular vote in a statewide election Johnson gave the party major party status in New Mexico.[10][11]

In January 2018, Aubrey Dunn Jr., the New Mexico Commissioner of Public Lands, announced that he had switched his party affiliation from Republican to Libertarian. Dunn was the first statewide official in the United States to be a member of the Libertarian Party.[12]

During the 2018 gubernatorial election Bob Walsh filed to run as the party's gubernatorial nominee and Robin Dunn as the lieutenant gubernatorial nominee. However, both filed after the deadline forcing them to run as write-in candidates to appear on the general election ballot. In the primary both failed to receive enough write-in votes to appear on the general election ballot. [13] The party maintained its major party status after receiving over 5% of the popular vote in the land commissioner and secretary of state elections.[10][14]

Elected officials

  • Laura Burrows, University of New Mexico-Los Alamos Advisory Board[15]
  • Veronica Rodriguez, Anthony Water & Sanitation Board[15]
  • Kene Lane Terry, Logan School District board member[15]
  • Max Tenorio Jr., Luna Community College board member[15]
  • Robin L. Dunn, Soil & Water Supervisor 1, Claunch Pinto Soil & Water Conservation Board[15]

Election results

Presidential

Presidential election
Election year Votes Percentage +/- Presidential ticket
1976[16] 1,110
Increase 0.27% MacBride/Bergland
1980[17] 4,365
Increase 0.69% Clark/Koch
1984[18] 4,459
Decrease 0.09% Bergland/Lewis
1988[19] 3,268
Decrease 0.24% Paul/Marrou
1992[20] 1,615
Increase 0.35% Marrou/Lord
1996[21] 2,996
Increase 0.26% Browne/Jorgensen
2000[22] 2,058
Decrease 0.20% Browne/Olivier
2004[23] 2,382
Decrease 0.03% Badnarik/Campagna
2008[24] 2,428
Decrease 0.02% Barr/Root
2012[25] 27,787
Increase 3.26% Johnson/Gray
2016[26] 74,541
Increase 5.79% Johnson/Weld
2020 N/A N/A Jorgensen/Cohen

See also

References

  1. ^ "N.M. Liberation Party Files Incorporation". Albuquerque Journal. June 28, 1972. p. 20. Archived from the original on August 10, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  2. ^ "Libertarians Schedule State Meet Here Today". Albuquerque Journal. July 22, 1972. p. 16. Archived from the original on August 10, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  3. ^ "Libertarians OK platform". The Santa Fe New Mexican. July 25, 1972. p. 12. Archived from the original on August 10, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  4. ^ "Libertarian Candidate Sues To Get on Ballot". Albuquerque Journal. September 2, 1978. p. 5. Archived from the original on August 11, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  5. ^ "Libertarian Kept Off State Ballot". Albuquerque Journal. September 9, 1978. p. 5. Archived from the original on August 11, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  6. ^ "Hopeful Denied Ballot Spot". Albuquerque Journal. October 13, 1978. p. 9. Archived from the original on August 11, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  7. ^ "Committee Endorses Petition Rules Change". Albuquerque Journal. March 10, 1983. p. 6. Archived from the original on August 16, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  8. ^ "Bill passes in House". Albuquerque Journal. March 17, 1983. p. 6. Archived from the original on August 16, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  9. ^ "Governor works against clock; signs several bills". The Santa Fe New Mexican. April 8, 1983. p. 3. Archived from the original on August 16, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  10. ^ a b "New Mexico Libertarians keep major party status". Albuquerque Journal. January 27, 2020. Archived from the original on August 11, 2020.
  11. ^ "The Libertarian Party is officially major party in N.M." Santa Fe New Mexican. January 29, 2018. Archived from the original on August 11, 2020.
  12. ^ "Dunn switches to Libertarian Party". Santa Fe New Mexican. January 27, 2018. Archived from the original on August 11, 2020.
  13. ^ "Libertarians miss general election ballot for governor". New Mexico Political Report. July 12, 2018. Archived from the original on August 11, 2020.
  14. ^ "Albuquerque Journal: New Mexico Libertarians keep major party status". Libertarian Party. January 28, 2020. Archived from the original on August 11, 2020.
  15. ^ a b c d e "2019 Current Libertarian Office Holders in New Mexico". Libertarian Party of New Mexico. Archived from the original on August 10, 2020.
  16. ^ "1976 presidential election results". Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections. Archived from the original on August 10, 2020.
  17. ^ "1980 presidential election results". Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections. Archived from the original on August 10, 2020.
  18. ^ "1984 presidential election results". Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections. Archived from the original on August 10, 2020.
  19. ^ "1988 presidential election results". Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections. Archived from the original on August 10, 2020.
  20. ^ "1992 presidential election results". Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections. Archived from the original on August 10, 2020.
  21. ^ "1996 presidential election results". Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections. Archived from the original on August 10, 2020.
  22. ^ "2000 presidential election results". Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections. Archived from the original on August 10, 2020.
  23. ^ "2004 presidential election results". Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections. Archived from the original on August 10, 2020.
  24. ^ "2008 presidential election results". Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections. Archived from the original on August 10, 2020.
  25. ^ "2012 presidential election results". Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections. Archived from the original on August 10, 2020.
  26. ^ "2016 presidential election results". Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections. Archived from the original on August 10, 2020.

External links


  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

Libertarian_Party_of_New_Mexico
 



 



 
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