List of Maya Sites
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List of Maya Sites

This list of Maya sites is an alphabetical listing of a number of significant archaeological sites associated with the Maya civilization of pre-Columbian Mesoamerica.

The peoples and cultures which comprised the Maya civilization spanned more than 2,500 years of Mesoamerican history, in the region of southern Mesoamerica which incorporates the present-day nations of Guatemala and Belize, much of Honduras and El Salvador, and the southeastern states of Mexico from the Isthmus of Tehuantepec eastwards, including the entire Yucatán Peninsula.

Throughout this region, many hundreds of Maya sites[1] have been documented in at least some form by archaeological surveys and investigations, while the numbers of smaller/uninvestigated (or unknown) sites are so numerous (one study has documented over 4,400 Maya sites)[2] that no complete archaeological list has yet been made. The listing which appears here is necessarily incomplete, however it contains notable sites drawn from several large and ongoing surveys, such as the Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions (CMHI) and other sources (see References).

Note : Ignore the Spanish definite article "El" or "La" (and their plurals "Los" and "Las") when looking for a site in the alphabetical listing e.g. for El Mirador, look under M rather than E.
Map depicting the Maya area within the larger Mesoamerican region. View full size for details.

Most important sites

Maya sites which are known to have been among the largest and most influential polities through the various eras of Maya history --Formative (or Preclassic), Classic and Postclassic-- and/or which have left the most impressive archaeological remains include:

Site Location Description Photo
El Baúl Escuintla Department, Guatemala El Baúl, along with the sites of Bilbao and El Castillo, forms the Cotzumalhuapa Nuclear Zone, a large urban area dating to the Late Classic period. El Baúl 2.jpg
Becan Campeche, Mexico Becan was a major city in the Yucatán Peninsula. It was occupied from about 550 BC, in the Middle Preclassic period and was inhabited through the entire Classic Period, finally being abandoned around the 9th century AD. The site had contact with Teotihuacan in the Early Classic and was fortified with a moat and ramparts.[3] Becan x2.jpg
Calakmul Campeche, Mexico Calakmul was one of the two most important Maya cities in the Classic Period, when its rivalry with Tikal dominated the Maya political landscape. The city was already an important city in the Late Preclassic, with dated monuments being erected up to the beginning of the 10th century AD.[4] Calakmul2.jpg
Caracol Cayo District, Belize Caracol was an important lowland Maya city, it was already settled in the Late Preclassic but reached its maximum power in the Classic Period when it was first allied with Tikal and later with Calakmul. It played an important role in the downfall of Tikal in the Early Classic and underwent a dramatic expansion in the Late Classic.[5] Panorama atop Caracol.png
El Ceibal (also known as Seibal) Petén Department, Guatemala Seibal was the largest Classic Period city in the Pasión River region, situated on bluffs overlooking the river. The city experienced a Late Preclassic apogee before declining in the Early Classic and falling under the domination of Dos Pilas in the Late Classic. It survived the collapse of that kingdom to become one of the last cities to survive in the area and was abandoned at the end of the Classic Period.[6] Seibal-temple.jpg
Chichen Itza Yucatán, Mexico Chichen Itza was one of the largest Maya cities and was a major focal point in the northern Maya lowlands from the Late Classic through to the Early Postclassic period and that demonstrated a variety of Maya and non-Maya architectural styles.[7] El Castillo Stitch 2008 observer edit.jpg
Chunchucmil Yucatán, Mexico Chunchucmil was a large site that reached its apogee during the Late to Terminal Classic. The organisation of the city appears to have differed from that of other Maya sites and appears to have been geared towards a specialised coastal trade in salt.[8] Chunchucmil-reconstruction-2.jpg
Coba Quintana Roo, Mexico Coba is large site situated among five small lakes on a dry plain. The site is known for a network of 16 causeways linking it to neighbouring sites, the longest of which runs over 100 kilometres (62 mi) west to Yaxuna. The main phase of occupation of the city dates to the Late Classic through to the Early Postclassic, from about AD 700 to 1100.[9] Coba Nohoch Mul-27527.jpg
Copán Copán Department, Honduras Copán was the capital city of a major Classic period kingdom from the 5th to 9th centuries AD, when it was closely allied with Tikal. The city was located in the extreme southeast of the Mesoamerican cultural region, on the frontier with the Isthmo-Colombian cultural region, and was almost surrounded by non-Maya peoples. The city is best known for its elaborate sculptural style.[10] Copan sculpture.jpg
Dos Pilas Petén Department, Guatemala Dos Pilas dates to the Late Classic Period, being founded by an offshoot of the Tikal dynasty in order to control trade routes in the Petexbatún region. It broke away from Tikal and became a vassal of Calakmul. It was a predator state from the beginning and the city gives an important glimpse into the great rivalries and political strife that characterised the Late Classic. Much of the history of Dos Pilas can now be reconstructed, with a level of detail that is almost unparalleled in the Maya area.[11] Dos Pilas 1.jpg
Dzibilchaltun Yucatán, Mexico Dzibilchaltun was a large and important city in the far north of the Yucatán Peninsula, with its principal architecture dating to the Classic Period, although activity at the site continued into the Late Postclassic when the city's main temple was already in ruins.[12] Dzibilchaltun.jpg
Iximche Chimaltenango Department, Guatemala Although short-lived, Iximche was the capital of the Kaqchikel highland kingdom at the time of the Spanish conquest of Guatemala and became the base of operations for the conquest of the highlands and Pacific coast until Spanish demands for tribute caused the Kaqchikels to break off their alliance and rebel. The Spanish then burned Iximche and moved their capital to nearby Tecpán Guatemala until frequent Kaqchikel raids forced them to move their colonial capital to what is now Ciudad Vieja near Antigua Guatemala.
Iximche1.jpg
Ixkun Petén Department, Guatemala Ixkun is a large site containing many unrestored mounds and ruins and is the best known archaeological site within the municipality of Dolores.[13] It was the capital of one of the four largest kingdoms in the upper Mopan Valley.[14] Stela 1 at Ixkun is one of the tallest stone monuments in the entire Petén Basin.[15] Although the main period of activity was during the Late Classic Period, the site was occupied from the Late Preclassic right through to the Postclassic Period.
Ixkun 8.jpg
Kaminaljuyu Guatemala Department, Guatemala Kaminaljuyu was founded in the Middle Preclassic and emerged as an important city in the Late Preclassic and dominated the entire Maya Highlands. It declined at the end of the Preclassic and was taken over by a new Maya group in the Early Classic with strong contacts with central Mexico. Occupation at Kaminaljuyu extended into the Late Classic.[16]
Kaminaljuyu 1979 motorcycle.jpg
Mayapan Yucatán, Mexico Mayapan was an important fortified city with a densely occupied area within the city walls. The principal pyramid at Mayapan was modelled after the main pyramid at Chichen Itza. The city was the most important site in Yucatán for a period of about 250 years during the Postclassic Period, with the earliest structures dating to the 12th century AD.[17] Mayapan Castillo.jpg
El Mirador Petén Department, Guatemala El Mirador was an enormous Late Preclassic city although construction apparently began in the Middle Preclassic and some level of occupation continued into the Classic Period. The city included some very large triadic pyramids and covered an area similar to that of Classic Period Tikal.[18] El Mirado mascaron.jpg
Naachtun Petén Department, Guatemala Naachtun is situated in the extreme north of Petén, in a central location between Tikal and Calakmul, the two great Classic Period Maya powers, both of which constantly influenced its politics. The hieroglyphic texts from the site cover almost the whole Classic Period from 504 to 761 AD, although the site was inhabited since the Preclassic.[19]
Nakbe Petén Department, Guatemala Nakbe was an important city in the Middle Preclassic, with its principal phase of occupation lasting from about 1000 BC to 400 BC. The city is linked to neighbouring El Mirador by a Late Preclassic causeway. Nakbe appears to possess the earliest examples of Maya masonry architecture and of sacbe causeways.[20] Nakbe str.JPG
Naranjo Petén Department, Guatemala Naranjo was the capital of a kingdom from the Early Classic through to the Late Classic and formed an important link in the trade routes running from the great city of Tikal to the Caribbean Sea. The earliest dated monuments at the site date to the late 5th century AD. The city became a vassal of Tikal's great rival Calakmul and was involved in a series of devastating wars.[21]
Oxkintok Yucatán, Mexico Oxkintok was one of the first Maya states to develop in the northern lowlands, undergoing a process of rapid development in the Early Classic Period that gave rise to an important capital with inscribed stone monuments. The earliest dated monument dates to the late 5th century AD.[22] Oxkintok-column-1.jpg
Palenque Chiapas, Mexico Palenque is located in the foothills of the Chiapas highlands. The city became dominant over the western Maya lowlands during the Late Classic, and engaged in hostilities with its neighbour Toniná that eventually eclipsed it. Hieroglyphic inscriptions at Palenque document a dynastic sequence stretching from the 5th century AD through to the end of the 8th century. The site is best known for the Temple of the Inscriptions, the mortuary shrine containing the tomb of king K'inich Janaab' Pakal.[23] Palenque - El Palacio - Tour (2).JPG
El Peru (also known as Waka') Petén Department, Guatemala El Perú was a major Classic Period ally of Calakmul in its wars against Tikal.[24] Waka altar.jpg
Piedras Negras Petén Department, Guatemala Piedras Negras was the largest city in the region of the Usumacinta River and is known for its excellent quality Late Classic sculpted monuments. These well preserved inscriptions provided the first evidence that Maya texts described historical events. The site has a continuous series of texts running from the 7th century AD through to the 9th century.[25] Maler Researches in the Central Portion of the Usumatsintla Valley Plate VIII.png
Quiriguá Izabal Department, Guatemala Quiriguá is a relatively small site that was founded by Tikal in the Early Classic in order to control the Motagua River trade route, important for the transport of jade and obsidian. Originally a vassal of Copán, the city rebelled and allied itself with Calakmul, after which it erected elaborate monuments in a style similar to that of its former overlord.[26] QuiriguaStela1.jpg
Q'umarkaj Quiché Department, Guatemala Q'umarkaj (also known as Utatlán) was the Postclassic capital of the K'iche' Kingdom of Q'umarkaj at the time of the Spanish Conquest and was one of the most powerful Maya cities at that time, dominating the Guatemalan Highlands.[27] Utatlan1.jpg
San Bartolo Petén Department, Guatemala San Bartolo is a remote site in the Guatemalan rainforest and was only discovered in 2001. Most of the structures at the site date to the Late Preclassic and overlie older Middle Preclassic architecture, although the city was reoccupied in the Late Classic. San Bartolo possesses one of the most important Preclassic murals yet found.[28] SBmural.jpg
Tikal Petén Department, Guatemala Tikal was founded in the Late Preclassic but reached its greatest power in the Late Classic, when most of its great temples were constructed. The site was one of the most powerful kingdoms in Maya history and possesses a dynastic chronology that extends from about AD 100 through to the 9th century. A long-running rivalry between Tikal and Calakmul began in the 6th century, with each of the two cities forming its own network of mutually hostile alliances arrayed against each other in what has been likened to a long-running war between two Maya superpowers.[29] Guatemala 074.jpg
Tulum Quintana Roo, Mexico Tulum is a Late Postclassic site situated on cliffs overlooking the Caribbean Sea and was probably occupied at the time of the Spanish Conquest. It is a small site with architecture in a style similar to that at the bigger cities of Chichen Itza and Mayapan. The site was probably founded to expand the coastal trade routes of the Yucatán Peninsula.[30] Templo del dios viento.jpg
Uxmal Yucatán, Mexico Uxmal was an important capital in the western Yucatán region, demonstrating architecture in the Puuc Maya style. The site reached its apogee in the Late to Terminal Classic from about AD 800–1000 and appears to have declined at the beginning of the Postclassic Period, although the exact length of occupation of the city is unknown.[31] Uxmal Pyramid of the Magician.jpg
Yaxchilan Chiapas, Mexico In the Late Classic Period Yaxchilan was one of the most powerful Maya cities along the course of the Usumacinta, with Piedras Negras as its major rival.[32]Architectural styles in subordinate sites in the Usumacinta region demonstrate clear differences that mark a clear boundary between the two kingdoms.[32] Yaxchilan was a large center, important throughout the Classic era, and the dominant power of the Usumacinta River area. It dominated such smaller sites as Bonampak.[33] The site is particularly known for its well-preserved sculptured stone lintels set above the doorways of the main structures.[34] Yaxchilan 1.jpg
Yaxha Petén Department, Guatemala Yaxha was a large city located upon the north shore of the lake of the same name. The city reached its maximum power in the Early Classic, when it was one of the largest capital cities in the Maya region; it was apparently allied with Tikal at that time. By the Late Classic its power had waned, perhaps linked to defeat by Calakmul or its allies.[35] Yaxhatemplo216.jpg

Alphabetical listing

A

B

C

Site Location Photo
Cahal Pech Cayo District, Belize Cahal Pech 2.jpg
Calakmul Campeche, Mexico[37] Calakr4.jpg
Campeche Campeche, Mexico
Cancuen Petén Department, Guatemala[56] Cancuenpanel3.jpg
Cansacbe Campeche, Mexico
Caracol Cayo District, Belize Belize caracol.jpg
El Caribe Petén Department, Guatemala[57]
Casa Blanca Santa Ana Department, El Salvador[58] Casa Blanca (sitio precolombino).jpg
Cenotillo Yucatán, Mexico
Los Cerritos-Chijoj Quiché Department, Guatemala[59] Guat2004 0426 112812ruins.JPG
Cerro Quiac Quetzaltenango Department, Guatemala[60] K'iaqbal 05.JPG
Cerros Corozal District, Belize Cerros1.jpg
Chac II Yucatán, Mexico Chac II.jpg
Chacchoben Quintana Roo, Mexico[37] Chacchoben 2.jpg
Chacmultun Yucatán, Mexico[37] Chacmultun Xeth Pol 3.jpg
Chactún Campeche, Mexico
Chakalal Quintana Roo, Mexico Chakalal.jpg
Chakanbakan Quintana Roo, Mexico[61]
Chakokot Petén Department, Guatemala[62]
El Chal Petén Department, Guatemala[63] El Chal 3.jpg
Chapayal Petén Department, Guatemala[64]
Chiapa de Corzo Chiapas, Mexico[65] Mound 1.JPG
Chicanna Campeche, Mexico[37] Chicanna XX.jpg
Chichen Itza Yucatán, Mexico[37] Chichen Itza ruins in Mexico -- by John Romkey.jpg
Chichmul Yucatán, Mexico
El Chicozapote Petén Department, Guatemala
Chinaha
Chinikiha Chiapas, Mexico Maler Researches in the Central Portion of the Usumatsintla Valley Plate II.png
Chinkultic Chiapas, Mexico[37] Chinkultic 0292.JPG
Chitinamit Quiché Department, Guatemala[66]
Chocolá Suchitepéquez Department, Guatemala[67]
Chojolom Quetzaltenango Department, Guatemala Chojolom 2.jpg
El Chorro Petén Department, Guatemala[68]
Chuctiepa Chiapas, Mexico
Chunchucmil Yucatán, Mexico Chunchucmil-mounds.jpg
Chunhuhub Campeche, Mexico[37] Chunhuhub01.JPG
Chunhuitz Petén Department, Guatemala
Chunlimon Campeche, Mexico Chunlimon2.jpg
Chutixtiox Quiché Department, Guatemala[69] Xutixtiox 39.JPG
Cihuatán San Salvador Department, El Salvador[70] Piramide Cihuatan.jpg
Cival Petén Department, Guatemala
Civiltuk
Coba Quintana Roo, Mexico[37] Oval Temple Coba.jpg
Comalcalco Tabasco, Mexico[37] Piramide comalcalco.jpg
Comitan Chiapas, Mexico
Consacbe
Copán Copán Department, Honduras CPN WEST COURT 01.jpg
La Corona (The enigmatic "Site Q") Petén Department, Guatemala
Corozal Corozal District, Belize
Cozumel Quintana Roo, Mexico
Cuca Yucatán, Mexico Cuca Maya.jpg
Cuello Orange Walk District, Belize

D

E

F

G

Site Location Photo
Guaquitepec Chiapas, Mexico
Gumarcaj (see Q'umarkaj) Quiché Department, Guatemala[76] Utatlan2.jpg

H

I

J

K

L

M

N

O

P

Q

R

S

T

U

W

X

Y

Z

See also

Notes

  1. ^ The CMHI enumeration of sites with inscriptions and/or Maya artworks, as modified and revised by Riese (2004) lists over 430 sites.
  2. ^ Witschey and Brown (2005)
  3. ^ Sharer & Traxler 2006, pp.372-373.
  4. ^ Sharer & Traxler 2006, pp.356-361.
  5. ^ Sharer & Traxler 2006, p.364.
  6. ^ Sharer & Traxler 2006, p.520.
  7. ^ Sharer & Traxler 2006, pp.562-566.
  8. ^ Sharer & Traxler 2006, pp.548-549.
  9. ^ Sharer & Traxler 2006, p.556.
  10. ^ Sharer & Traxler 2006, pp.333-341.
  11. ^ Sharer & Traxler 2006, pp.383-387. Martin & Grube 2000, p.55.
  12. ^ Sharer & Traxler 2006, p.550.
  13. ^ Laporte & Mejía 2005, p. 5.
  14. ^ Laporte 2005, p.202.
  15. ^ Laporte & Torres 1994, p. 131.
  16. ^ Sharer & Traxler 2006, p.195.
  17. ^ Sharer & Traxler 2006, pp.592-599.
  18. ^ Sharer & Traxler 2006, pp.252-253.
  19. ^ a b Mathews et al 2005, p.669.
  20. ^ Sharer & Traxler 2006, p.210.
  21. ^ Sharer & Traxler 2006, p.380.
  22. ^ Sharer & Traxler 2006, p.301.
  23. ^ Sharer & Traxler 2006, pp.451-472.
  24. ^ Sharer & Traxler 2006, p.496.
  25. ^ Sharer & Traxler 2006, p.424.
  26. ^ Sharer & Traxler 2006, pp.351-354. Martin & Grube 2000, p.216. Miller 1999, pp.134-35.
  27. ^ Sharer & Traxler 2006, pp.4, 621-623.
  28. ^ Sharer & Traxler 2006, p.262.
  29. ^ Sharer & Traxler 2006, pp.1, 302-311. Webster 2002, pp.168-9.
  30. ^ Sharer & Traxler 2006, p.609.
  31. ^ Sharer & Traxler 2006, pp.536-537.
  32. ^ a b Sharer & Traxler 2006, p.421.
  33. ^ Coe 1999, p.125.
  34. ^ Sharer & Traxler 2006, p.435.
  35. ^ Sharer & Traxler 2006, p.375.
  36. ^ a b Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes. #1713.
  37. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw ax CONACULTA 2007, pp.IV.3-4 (96-97).
  38. ^ Benavides C. 2005, p.16.
  39. ^ Awe et al 2005, p.223.
  40. ^ LeCount 2004, p.27.
  41. ^ Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes. #332.
  42. ^ Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes. #367.
  43. ^ Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes. #354.
  44. ^ Moriarty 2005, p.444.
  45. ^ Andrews 1984, 1990, p.8.
  46. ^ Pharo 2014, p. 97.
  47. ^ Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes. #363.
  48. ^ Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes.
  49. ^ Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes. #370.
  50. ^ Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes. #355.
  51. ^ Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes. #1115.
  52. ^ Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes. #1210.
  53. ^ Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes. #2.
  54. ^ Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes. #427.
  55. ^ Moriarty 2005, p.443.
  56. ^ Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes. #345.
  57. ^ Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes. #368.
  58. ^ Ichikawa et al 2009, pp.502, 505.
  59. ^ Garrido 2009, p.1011.
  60. ^ Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes. #1651.
  61. ^ a b Esparza Olguín and Pérez Gutiérrez 2009, p. 1.
  62. ^ Moriarty 2005, p.441.
  63. ^ Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes. #53.
  64. ^ Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes. #21.
  65. ^ a b CONACULTA 2007, p.IV.5 (98).
  66. ^ Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes. #1005.
  67. ^ Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes. #2126.
  68. ^ Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes. #364.
  69. ^ a b Adams 1996, p. 318.
  70. ^ Amaroli and Amador 2003, p. 2.
  71. ^ Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes. #361.
  72. ^ a b c d Esparza Olguín and Pérez Gutiérrez 2009, p. 15.
  73. ^ Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes. #177.
  74. ^ Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes. #232.
  75. ^ Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes. #129.
  76. ^ Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes. Listed as Utatlan (Qumarkaaj), #1008.
  77. ^ Muñoz Cosme et al 2010, p. 378.
  78. ^ Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes. #140.
  79. ^ García-Des Lauriers, undated.
  80. ^ Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes. #192.
  81. ^ Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes. #715.
  82. ^ Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes. #17.
  83. ^ Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes. #136.
  84. ^ Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes. #18.
  85. ^ Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes. #7.
  86. ^ Benavides C. 2005, p.22.
  87. ^ Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes. #179.
  88. ^ Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes. #204.
  89. ^ Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes. #1306.
  90. ^ Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes. #412.
  91. ^ Wölfel and Frühsorge 2008, pp. 86-87
  92. ^ INAH 2015.
  93. ^ Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes. #198.
  94. ^ Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes. #215.
  95. ^ Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes. #288.
  96. ^ Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes. #696.
  97. ^ Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes. #1111.
  98. ^ Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes. #313.
  99. ^ Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes. #213.
  100. ^ Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes. #317.
  101. ^ Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes. #400.
  102. ^ Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes. #905.
  103. ^ a b Benavides C. 2005, p.23.
  104. ^ Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes. #1220.
  105. ^ Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes. #199.
  106. ^ Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes. #202.
  107. ^ a b Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes. #229.
  108. ^ Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes. #210.
  109. ^ Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes. #404.
  110. ^ Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes. #162.
  111. ^ Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes. #194.
  112. ^ Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes. #655.
  113. ^ Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes. #209.
  114. ^ Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes. #359.
  115. ^ Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes. #1466.
  116. ^ Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes. #1555.
  117. ^ Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes. #1008.
  118. ^ Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes. #413.
  119. ^ Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes. #16, 30-33.
  120. ^ Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes. #435.
  121. ^ Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes. #155.
  122. ^ Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes. #347.
  123. ^ Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes. #1469.
  124. ^ Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes. #366.
  125. ^ Foley 2007.
  126. ^ Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes. #131.
  127. ^ Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes. #180.
  128. ^ Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes. #267.
  129. ^ Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes. #156.
  130. ^ Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes. #352.
  131. ^ Moriarty 2005, p.445.
  132. ^ a b Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes. #181.
  133. ^ Benavides C. 2005, p.25.
  134. ^ Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes. #423.
  135. ^ Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes. #411.
  136. ^ Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes. #322.
  137. ^ Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes. #159.
  138. ^ Rice and Rice 1997, p. 567.
  139. ^ Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes. #1420.
  140. ^ Estrada-Belli and Foley 2004, p.843.
  141. ^ Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes. #207.
  142. ^ Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes. #314.

External links

The long-term research project Text Database Dictionary of Classic Mayan is working on a list of Archaeological Sites with Maya Inscriptions that is constantly growing. The list is sorted by site name, and primarily encompasses the archaeological sites in Mesoamerica where Maya hieroglyphic inscriptions have been discovered and verifiably documented over the course of archaeological survey and excavations.

References


  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

List_of_Maya_sites
 



 



 
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