Maweke
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Maweke

According to the Hawaiian chants, Chief Maweke (also spelled M?weke in Hawaiian; Hawaiian pronunciation: MAH-WEH-KEH) was a chief of the highest known rank who lived in the 11th century.[1] He is described in the legends as a wizard (or priest, kahuna in Hawaiian language) and an Ali?i (a noble) of "the blue blood" (a Hawaiian nobleman of the highest rank). He was an ancestor of the royalty of the island of Oahu.[2]

He was not of Hawaiian origin, but came to Hawaii from Tahiti and was famous for his knowledge of black magic. His famous ancestor was Nanaulu.[3]

His parents are named in the chants as Kekupahaikala (father) and Maihikea (mother).[4]

When he arrived to Oahu, Maweke erected a temple to the god called Kanaloa.[5]

Oahu, a Hawaiian island on which Maweke arrived

Maweke married woman named Naiolaukea (Naiolakea).[6] They had children:

References

  1. ^ THE MOIKEHA-LA'A MIGRATION
  2. ^ Annual Report of the Hawaiian Historical Society, Volumes 40-46. Hawaiian Historical Society, 1932.
  3. ^ M?weke, A Voyaging Ali?i
  4. ^ Kamakau, Samuel Manaiakalani, Ka Nupepa Kuokoa (Newspaper). 1865. Ka Moolelo O Hawaii Nei Helu 14 (The History of Hawaii No. 14).
  5. ^ Family of Maweke Archived 2016-08-27 at the Wayback Machine
  6. ^ Kamakau, Samuel M., Ruling Chiefs of Hawaii (Revised Edition). Appendix Genealogies (Kamehameha Schools Press, Honolulu, Hawaii, 1961).
  7. ^ Patrick Vinton Kirch (2010). How Chiefs Became Kings: Divine Kingship and the Rise of Archaic States in Ancient Hawai'i.
  8. ^ Kal?kaua, His Hawaiian Majesty. The Legends And Myths of Hawaii: The Fable and Folk-lore of a Strange People. Tokyo, Japan: Charles E. Tuttle Company Inc. of Rutland, Vermont & Tokyo Japan, 1972.
  9. ^ Native Planters in Old Hawaii: their life, lore, and environment; by Edward Smith Craighill Handy; Elizabeth Green Handy; Mary Kawena Pukui. Honolulu, 1972

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Maweke
 



 



 
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