Michigan's Congressional Districts
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Michigan's Congressional Districts

Michigan's congressional districts since 2013[1]

Michigan is divided into 14 congressional districts, each represented by a member of the United States House of Representatives.[2]

The districts are currently represented in the 116th United States Congress by 7 Democrats, 6 Republicans, and one Libertarian.

Current districts and members

List of members of the House delegation, their time in office, district maps, and the districts' political ratings according to the CPVI. The delegation has 14 members, including 6 Republicans, 7 Democrats, and 1 Libertarian.

District Incumbent District
Member
(Residence)
Party Time in office[a] CPVI Location
1st Jack Bergman (2017).jpg
Jack Bergman
(Watersmeet)
Republican since January 3, 2017 R+9 MI 1Michigan US Congressional District 1 (since 2013).tif
2nd Bill Huizenga official congressional photo.jpg
Bill Huizenga
(Zeeland)
Republican since January 3, 2011 R+9 Michigan US Congressional District 2 (since 2013).tif
3rd Justin Amash official photo.jpg
Justin Amash
(Cascade Township)
Libertarian since January 3, 2011 R+6 Michigan US Congressional District 3 (since 2013).tif
4th John Moolenaar.jpg
John Moolenaar
(Midland)
Republican since January 3, 2015 R+10 Michigan US Congressional District 4 (since 2013).tif
5th Dan Kildee 116th Congress.jpg
Dan Kildee
(Flint Township)
Democratic since January 3, 2013 D+5 Michigan US Congressional District 5 (since 2013).tif
6th Fred Upton 113th Congress.jpg
Fred Upton
(St. Joseph)
Republican since January 3, 1987 R+4 Michigan US Congressional District 6 (since 2013).tif
7th Tim Walberg, Official Portrait, 112th Congress.jpg
Tim Walberg
(Tipton)
Republican since January 3, 2011 R+7 Michigan US Congressional District 7 (since 2013).tif
8th Elissa Slotkin, official portrait, 116th Congress.jpg
Elissa Slotkin
(Holly)
Democratic since January 3, 2019 R+4 Michigan US Congressional District 8 (since 2013).tif
9th Andy Levin, official portrait, 116th Congress.jpg
Andy Levin
(Bloomfield Township)
Democratic since January 3, 2019 D+4 Michigan US Congressional District 9 (since 2013).tif
10th Paul Mitchell official congressional photo.jpg
Paul Mitchell
(Dryden Township)
Republican since January 3, 2017 R+13 Michigan US Congressional District 10 (since 2013).tif
11th Haley Stevens, official portrait, 116th Congress.jpg
Haley Stevens
(Rochester Hills)
Democratic since January 3, 2019 R+4 Michigan US Congressional District 11 (since 2013).tif
12th Debbie Dingell 116th Congress.jpg
Debbie Dingell
(Dearborn)
Democratic since January 3, 2015 D+14 Michigan US Congressional District 12 (since 2013).tif
13th Rashida Tlaib, official portrait, 116th Congress.jpg
Rashida Tlaib
(Detroit)
Democratic since January 3, 2019 D+32 Michigan US Congressional District 13 (since 2013).tif
14th Brenda Lawrence official portrait (cropped).jpg
Brenda Lawrence
(Southfield)
Democratic since January 3, 2015 D+30 Michigan US Congressional District 14 (since 2013).tif

Historical district boundaries

Below is a table of United States congressional district boundary maps for the State of Michigan, presented chronologically forward.[3] All redistricting events that took place in Michigan in the decades between 1973 and 2013 are shown.

Year Statewide map Congressional delegation
1973-1982 United States Congressional Districts in Michigan, 1973 - 1982.tif 1/3/1973-1/3/1974: 7 Democrats, 12 Republicans

1/3/1974-1/3/1975: 9 Democrats, 10 Republicans

1/3/1975-1/3/1977: 12 Democrats, 7 Republicans

1/3/1977-1/3/1979: 11 Democrats, 8 Republicans

1/3/1979-1/3/1981: 13 Democrats, 6 Republicans

1/3/1981-1/3/1983: 12 Democrats, 7 Republicans

1983-1992 United States Congressional Districts in Michigan, 1983 - 1992.tif 1/3/1983-1/3/1985: 12 Democrats, 6 Republicans

1/3/1985-1/3/1987: 11 Democrats, 7 Republicans

1/3/1987-1/3/1989: 11 Democrats, 7 Republicans

1/3/1989-1/3/1991: 11 Democrats, 7 Republicans

1/3/1991-1/3/1993: 11 Democrats, 7 Republicans

1993-2002 United States Congressional Districts in Michigan, 1993 - 2002.tif
Note: The orange 6th is mislabeled; it should read 13th.

1/3/1993-1/3/1995: 10 Democrats, 6 Republicans

1/3/1995-1/3/1997: 9 Democrats, 7 Republicans

1/3/1997-1/3/1999: 10 Democrats, 6 Republicans

1/3/1999-1/3/2001: 10 Democrats, 6 Republicans

1/3/2001-1/3/2003: 9 Democrats, 7 Republicans

2003-2013 United States Congressional Districts in Michigan, 2003 - 2013.tif 1/3/2003-1/3/2005: 6 Democrats, 9 Republicans

1/3/2005-1/3/2007: 6 Democrats, 9 Republicans

1/3/2007-1/3/2009: 6 Democrats, 9 Republicans

1/3/2009-1/3/11: 8 Democrats, 7 Republicans

1/3/2011-7/6/2012: 6 Democrats, 9 Republicans

7/6/2012-11/6/2012: 6 Democrats, 8 Republicans, 1 Vacant seat

11/6/2012-1/3/2013: 7 Democrats, 8 Republicans

Since 2013 United States Congressional Districts in Michigan, since 2013.tif 1/3/2013-1/3/2015: 5 Democrats, 9 Republicans

1/3/2015-1/3/2017: 5 Democrats, 9 Republicans

1/3/2017-1/3/2019: 5 Democrats, 9 Republicans

1/3/2019-7/4/2019: 7 Democrats, 7 Republicans

7/4/2019-5/4/2020: 7 Democrats, 6 Republicans, 1 Independent[4]

5/4/2020-present: 7 Democrats, 6 Republicans, 1 Libertarian[5]

Obsolete districts

See also

Notes

  1. ^ "Time in office" reflects each member's time since becoming a member, not the member's time since becoming a member for the current district. Redistricting commonly results in a district being moved elsewhere in the state and its representative beginning to represent a different district in the same location.

References

  1. ^ "The national atlas". nationalatlas.gov. Archived from the original on February 22, 2014. Retrieved 2014.
  2. ^ "Directory of Representatives". The United States House of Representatives. Retrieved 2013.
  3. ^ "Digital Boundary Definitions of United States Congressional Districts, 1789-2012". Retrieved 2014.
  4. ^ https://nbc25news.com/news/local/rep-justin-amash-leaving-the-republican-party
  5. ^ https://www.270towin.com/news/2020/05/04/rep-justin-amash-becomes-first-libertarian-member-of-congress_1016.html

External links


  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

Michigan's_congressional_districts
 



 



 
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