Mischa Zverev
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Mischa Zverev

Mischa Zverev
Zverev M. WMQ16 (7) (28177277456).jpg
Country (sports) Germany
ResidenceMonte Carlo, Monaco
Born (1987-08-22) 22 August 1987 (age 32)[1]
Moscow, Soviet Union
Height1.91 m (6 ft 3 in)
Turned pro2005
PlaysLeft-handed (two-handed backhand)
CoachAlexander Zverev Sr.
Prize moneyUS$5,647,193
Singles
Career record132-196 (40.2% in ATP Tour and Grand Slam main draw matches, and in Davis Cup)
Career titles1
Highest rankingNo. 25 (24 July 2017)
Current rankingNo. 291 (4 November 2019)
Grand Slam Singles results
Australian OpenQF (2017)
French Open3R (2018)
Wimbledon3R (2008, 2017)
US Open4R (2017)
Doubles
Career record83-116 (41.7% in ATP Tour and Grand Slamts main draw matches, and in Davis Cup)
Career titles4
Highest rankingNo. 44 (8 June 2009)
Current rankingNo. 109 (4 November 2019)
Grand Slam Doubles results
Australian Open2R (2017)
French Open2R (2009, 2017)
Wimbledon2R (2019)
US Open2R (2008, 2009)
Team competitions
Davis CupQF (2009)
Last updated on: 4 November 2019.

Mikhail "Mischa" Alexandrovich Zverev (Russian: "?" ? ,[a]pronounced [mx?'i? 'm?i 'zv?erf]; born 22 August 1987) is a German professional tennis player of Russian descent. He achieved a career-high singles ranking of world No. 25 on 24 July 2017. He has also played the semi final of Australian Open 2020.

At the 2017 Australian Open, Zverev beat world No. 1 Andy Murray in four sets before losing in the quarterfinals to eventual champion Roger Federer. As a qualifier, he has also reached the quarterfinals of both the 2009 Italian Open and the 2016 Shanghai Masters.

Personal life

Sascha & Mischa Zverev

Zverev was born in Moscow, USSR, the son of former Russian tennis player Alexander Zverev Sr., who is also his coach. Internationally, he represents Germany and resides in Monte Carlo, Monaco. His younger brother, Alexander Zverev, also plays on the tour.

He married his girlfriend Evgenija in a ceremony in the Maldives in November 2017.

Juniors

Zverev had a very successful junior career, attaining a No. 3 combined world ranking and making the semifinals of the US Open (losing to Andy Murray), as well as the quarterfinals of Roland Garros (losing to Alex Kuznetsov) and the Australian Open (losing to Novak Djokovic) in 2004. In doubles he reached the final of the French Open in the same year.

As a junior, he compiled a 123-50 win/loss record in singles (and 79-33 in doubles).

Professional career

2006

In October 2006, he made his first quarterfinal at ATP level in Bangkok, Thailand, beating former world No. 1 Juan Carlos Ferrero and former world No. 5 Rainer Schüttler before losing to Marat Safin, also a former world No. 1.

2007: Cracking the top 100

He spent all of 2007 inside the top 200 and, in July, made a second quarterfinal in Rhode Island. He then won a Challenger title in August at a tournament held in Istanbul and followed that up with another quarterfinal run at the Bronx Challenger, which saw him crack the top 100 for the first time in his career.

2008: First doubles title

At the 2008 Australian Open, Zverev nearly upset 11th seed Tommy Robredo in the first round. He took the first two sets but went down in five. In June 2008, Zverev managed to secure his first ATP title victory by winning the doubles together with his partner Mikhail Youzhny at the Gerry Weber Open in Halle, Germany.

At the 2008 Wimbledon Championships, Zverev surprisingly reached the third round after wins over Alexander Peya and Juan Carlos Ferrero, but was then forced to retire in his third round match against Stan Wawrinka due to pain in his left thigh.

2009: Italian Open quarterfinal

In May, he reached the quarterfinals of the Italian Open, losing to world No. 2 Roger Federer in straight sets. He later helped Germany reach the final of the ARAG World Team Cup with teammates Nicolas Kiefer, Rainer Schüttler and Philipp Kohlschreiber. At the 2009 Wimbledon Championships, Zverev beat 25th seed Dmitry Tursunov in straight sets. He faced Philipp Petzschner in the second round and lost in five sets. He was nominated by Davis Cup captain Patrik Kühnen for the quarterfinal against Spain in Marbella. He lost his doubles match with Nicolas Kiefer to Feliciano López and Fernando Verdasco in four sets.

2010: First ATP final

Zverev began his comeback at the Brisbane International in January after a right wrist fracture. However, he lost to Australian wildcard Carsten Ball in straight sets. He made his next appearance at the Medibank International in Sydney where he lost in the first round of qualifying. At the 2010 Australian Open, he lost to ?ukasz Kubot from Poland in straight sets.

He regained his form at the European indoor tournaments. In Marseille he reached the semifinal, defeating world No. 17 Tommy Robredo along the way. He lost to eventual champion Michaël Llodra. His good form carried on - he went on to win after saving a match point in his first round match in Delray Beach against Michael Russell before falling to Mardy Fish in two sets. He lost his opening match in Indian Wells. At the 2010 Sony Ericsson Open in Miami, Zverev was knocked out in the first round of qualifying. He would not win a main draw match in a tournament for the next seven weeks. In preparation for Wimbledon he accepted a Wildcard into the 2010 Gerry Weber Open where he defeated Florent Serra and Jürgen Melzer before falling to Benjamin Becker. Again, he seemed to have found some form - however, he was defeated by Andre Begemann in the first round of qualifying at Wimbledon. Zverev then decided to enter more ATP Challenger Tour events and reached the quarterfinals of the Oberstaufen Challenger. Despite being granted a wildcard into both Stuttgart and Hamburg, he could not manage to win more than one match.

At the 2010 US Open, he was knocked out in the first round of qualifying again. He then returned to Europe playing a clay court ATP Challenger Tour Event in Genoa. He reached the quarter-finals where he was defeated by eventual champion Fabio Fognini. Two weeks later he managed to qualify for the Open de Moselle in Metz. Zverev reached his maiden ATP World Tour singles final after victories over Horacio Zeballos, Nicolas Mahut, Jarkko Nieminen and the retirement of Richard Gasquet in the semifinals. In the final Zverev played Gilles Simon to whom he lost in two sets. He qualified for the main draw of the ATP World Tour Masters 1000 tournament in Shanghai. In the main draw he lost to Juan Mónaco in the third round after beating Sergiy Stakhovsky and Nikolay Davydenko in the first and second rounds respectively. At the end of October he again qualified for an ATP tournament, this time at Montpellier. He defeated Robin Haase in the first round before falling to Nikolay Davydenko in the second round. He finished the year at No. 82, having made $318,805 in prize money in addition to a compiling a singles match record of 13-18.

2011

Zverev had a slow start to 2011, losing four matches in a row before capturing his first win of the season in Indian Wells, where he made the second round after defeating Matthew Ebden. He then lost another four matches in a row again, prior to his victory over Dudi Sela in the first round at the Serbia Open.

2012-2015

Zverev played mainly in tournaments either on the ATP Challenger Tour or the ITF Men's Circuit during this time.

2016: Shanghai Masters quarterfinal

In April 2016, Zverev won his first ATP Challenger singles title in over eight years at the Sarasota Open.

At the 2016 Shanghai Masters, the German defeated world No. 14 Nick Kyrgios in the second round. He then beat Marcel Granollers before losing a close match to world No. 1 Novak Djokovic in the quarterfinals.

Zverev got to the semifinals at the Swiss Indoors tournament in Basel after beating world No. 3 Stan Wawrinka.

2017: First Grand Slam quarterfinal, first seeding at a Grand Slam & cracking the top 30

Zverev started his 2017 season at the Brisbane International with a loss to Rafael Nadal in the second round, winning only two games. However, at the 2017 Australian Open, Zverev was able to reach the quarterfinals after defeating world No. 1 Andy Murray in the fourth round, marking the biggest accomplishment of his career to date.[2][3] Zverev ultimately ended up losing to the eventual champion and 17th seed, Roger Federer in straight sets, ending his remarkable run. In Indian Wells he was the 29th seed, marking the first time he has been seeded in a Masters tournament and thus meaning he would get a bye into the second round. In the second round he faced former world No. 28 Joao Sousa and defeated him in straight sets, then faced 8th seed Dominic Thiem against whom he lost to in straight sets. At the 2017 Miami Open he was the 28th seed, again receiving a bye into the second round, but he lost to qualifier Jared Donaldson. Zverev made his 2nd ATP level final at the Geneva Open losing in 3 sets to Stan Wawrinka. He was seeded for the first time at a Grand Slam in Paris as the 32nd seed, but lost in the first round to the unseeded Stefano Napolitano. At the 2017 MercedesCup the home crowd saw him reach the semifinals, where he lost a close three setter to Feliciano Lopez. Then at the 2017 Gerry Weber Open he won against Lukas Lacko in straight sets, before losing in two close sets to eight time Halle champion Roger Federer. In Halle doubles action he would make his second final of the year, partnering his younger brother Alexander.[4] At the 2017 Wimbledon Championships as the 27th seed Zverev reached the third round after beating Bernard Tomic and Mikhail Kukushkin.[5] By virtue of his Wimbledon showing, Mischa would move up to a career-best world No. 25 in the ATP rankings. As the 23rd seed, he made the fourth round at the next Grand Slam, the US Open. Zverev would go on to finish the year ranked No. 33, improving 18 spots from his previous best finish in 2016.

2018: First ATP title

After pulling out of the first round of the Australian Open while trailing Hyeon Chung 6-2, 4-1, Zverev was fined a record $45,000 for an 'unprofessional first round performance', becoming the first player to be fined under the new rule. The fine represented nearly all of the prize money he would have received for losing in the first round.[6]

Zverev won his first career ATP title at the 2018 Eastbourne International, defeating Nicolás Jarry, seventh seed Steve Johnson, third seed Denis Shapovalov, Mikhail Kukushkin, and Luká? Lacko.[7]

ATP career finals

Singles: 3 (1 title, 2 runner-ups)

Legend
Grand Slam tournaments (0-0)
ATP World Tour Finals (0-0)
ATP World Tour Masters 1000 (0-0)
ATP World Tour 500 Series (0-0)
ATP World Tour 250 Series (1-2)
Finals by surface
Hard (0-1)
Clay (0-1)
Grass (1-0)
Finals by setting
Outdoor (1-1)
Indoor (0-1)
Result W-L    Date    Tournament Tier Surface Opponent Score
Loss 0-1 Sep 2010 Moselle Open, France 250 Series Hard (i) France Gilles Simon 3-6, 2-6
Loss 0-2 May 2017 Geneva Open, Switzerland 250 Series Clay Switzerland Stan Wawrinka 6-4, 3-6, 3-6
Win 1-2 Jun 2018 Eastbourne International, United Kingdom 250 Series Grass Slovakia Luká? Lacko 6-4, 6-4

Doubles: 12 (4 titles, 8 runner-ups)

Legend
Grand Slam tournaments (0-0)
ATP World Tour Finals (0-0)
ATP World Tour Masters 1000 (0-0)
ATP International Series Gold /
ATP World Tour 500 Series (2-4)
ATP International Series /
ATP World Tour 250 Series (2-4)
Finals by surface
Hard (3-4)
Clay (0-2)
Grass (1-2)
Finals by setting
Outdoor (3-5)
Indoor (1-3)
Result W-L    Date    Tournament Tier Surface Partner Opponents Score
Win 1-0 Jun 2008 Halle Open, Germany International Grass Russia Mikhail Youzhny Czech Republic Luká? Dlouhý
India Leander Paes
3-6, 6-4, [10-3]
Loss 1-1 Jul 2008 Stuttgart Open, Germany Intl. Gold Clay Germany Michael Berrer Germany Philipp Kohlschreiber
Germany Christopher Kas
3-6, 4-6
Win 2-1 Oct 2008 Japan Open, Japan Intl. Gold Hard Russia Mikhail Youzhny Czech Republic Luká? Dlouhý
India Leander Paes
6-3, 6-4
Loss 2-2 Jan 2009 Brisbane International, Australia 250 Series Hard Spain Fernando Verdasco France Marc Gicquel
France Jo-Wilfried Tsonga
4-6, 3-6
Loss 2-3 Oct 2009 Thailand Open, Thailand 250 Series Hard (i) Spain Guillermo García López United States Eric Butorac
United States Rajeev Ram
6-7(4-7), 3-6
Loss 2-4 May 2015 Bavarian Championships, Germany 250 Series Clay Germany Alexander Zverev Austria Alexander Peya
Brazil Bruno Soares
6-4, 1-6, [5-10]
Loss 2-5 Feb 2016 Open Sud de France, France 250 Series Hard (i) Germany Alexander Zverev Croatia Mate Pavi?
New Zealand Michael Venus
5-7, 6-7(4-7)
Win 3-5 Feb 2017 Open Sud de France, France 250 Series Hard (i) Germany Alexander Zverev France Fabrice Martin
Canada Daniel Nestor
6-4, 6-7(3-7), [10-7]
Loss 3-6 Jun 2017 Halle Open, Germany 500 Series Grass Germany Alexander Zverev Poland ?ukasz Kubot
Brazil Marcelo Melo
7-5, 3-6, [8-10]
Loss 3-7 Jun 2018 Halle Open, Germany 500 Series Grass Germany Alexander Zverev Poland ?ukasz Kubot
Brazil Marcelo Melo
6-7(1-7), 4-6
Loss 3-8 Oct 2018 Swiss Indoors, Switzerland 500 Series Hard (i) Germany Alexander Zverev United Kingdom Dominic Inglot
Croatia Franko ?kugor
2-6, 5-7
Win 4-8 Mar 2019 Mexican Open, Mexico 500 Series Hard Germany Alexander Zverev United States Austin Krajicek
New Zealand Artem Sitak
2-6, 7-6(7-4), [10-5]

Team competition: 1 (1 runner-up)

Result W-L Year Tournament Surface Partners Opponents Score
Loss 0-1 2009 World Team Cup, Germany Clay Germany Nicolas Kiefer
Germany Philipp Kohlschreiber
Germany Rainer Schüttler
Serbia Janko Tipsarevi?
Serbia Viktor Troicki
Serbia Nenad Zimonji?
1-2

ATP Challenger and ITF Futures finals

Singles: 16 (10-6)

ATP Challenger (5-6)
ITF Futures (5-0)
Result W-L    Date    Tournament Tier Surface Opponent Score
Win 1-0 Feb 2006 Mettmann, Germany Futures Carpet (i) Germany Philipp Petzschner 3-6, 6-3, 6-4
Win 2-0 Feb 2006 Zagreb, Croatia Futures Hard (i) Croatia Marin ?ili? 7-6(7-5), 3-6, 7-6(9-7)
Win 3-0 Jul 2006 Munakata, Japan Futures Hard Japan Gouichi Motomura 6-3, 7-6(7-5)
Win 4-0 Jul 2006 Dublin, Ireland Futures Carpet Australia Paul Baccanello 6-4, 7-6(7-3)
Win 1-0 Jul 2006 Dublin, Ireland Challenger Carpet Denmark Kristian Pless 7-5, 7-6(8-6)
Loss 1-1 Nov 2006 Shrewsbury, United Kingdom Challenger Hard (i) United Kingdom Alex Bogdanovic 6-4, 4-6, 4-6
Win 2-1 Jun 2007 Karlsruhe, Germany Challenger Clay United States Wayne Odesnik 2-6, 6-4, 6-3
Win 3-1 Aug 2007 Istanbul, Turkey Challenger Hard Slovakia Luká? Lacko 6-4, 6-4
Win 4-1 Nov 2007 Dnepropetrovsk, Ukraine Challenger Hard (i) Russia Dmitry Tursunov 6-4, 6-4
Loss 4-2 Nov 2011 Geneva, Switzerland Challenger Hard (i) Tunisia Malek Jaziri 6-4, 3-6, 3-6
Loss 4-3 Apr 2012 Le Gosier, Guadeloupe Challenger Hard Belgium David Goffin 2-6, 2-6
Loss 4-4 Oct 2012 Sacramento, United States Challenger Hard United States James Blake 1-6, 6-1, 4-6
Loss 4-5 Oct 2012 Tiburon, United States Challenger Hard United States Jack Sock 1-6, 6-1, 6-7(3-7)
Win 5-0 Oct 2012 Mansfield, United States Futures Hard United States Alex Kuznetsov 3-6, 6-0, 6-3
Loss 4-6 Jan 2013 Maui, United States Challenger Hard Japan Go Soeda 5-7, 5-7
Win 5-6 Apr 2016 Sarasota, United States Challenger Clay Austria Gerald Melzer 6-4, 7-6(7-2)

Doubles: 25 (11-14)

ATP Challenger (6-7)
ITF Futures (5-7)
Result W-L    Date    Tournament Tier Surface Partner Opponents Score
Win 1-0 Jan 2005 Tampa, United States Futures Hard United States Alex Kuznetsov United States Goran Dragicevic
United States Michael Yani
6-4, 7-5
Win 2-0 Jan 2005 Kissimmee, United States Futures Hard United States Alex Kuznetsov Australia David McNamara
Canada Frederic Niemeyer
6-7(5-7), 6-3, 7-6(8-6)
Loss 2-1 Jun 2005 Vierumaki, Finland Futures Clay Germany Benedikt Dorsch Estonia Mait Künnap
Finland Janne Ojala
3-6, 3-6
Loss 2-2 Jul 2005 Telfs, Austria Futures Clay Germany Benedikt Dorsch Germany Bastian Knittel
Germany Christopher Koderisch
1-2, ret.
Loss 0-1 Dec 2005 Orlando, United States Challenger Hard United States Alex Kuznetsov Australia Ashley Fisher
United States Tripp Phillips
0-6, 3-2, def.
Win 3-2 Jan 2006 Oberentfelden, Germany Futures Hard (i) Sweden Ervin Eleskovic Germany David Klier
Germany Torsten Popp
5-7, 6-3, 6-4
Loss 3-3 Feb 2006 Zagreb, Croatia Futures Hard (i) Germany Tobias Klein France Jean-François Bachelot
France Nicolas Tourte
6-7(7-9), 6-7(3-7)
Loss 3-4 Apr 2006 Dubai, United Arab Emirates Futures Hard Serbia Viktor Troicki Switzerland Marco Chiudinelli
Germany Philipp Petzschner
5-7, 2-6
Win 4-4 Apr 2006 Dubai, United Arab Emirates Futures Hard Serbia Viktor Troicki Russia Vadim Davletshin
Russia Alexandre Krasnoroutskiy
6-3, 6-2
Loss 4-5 May 2006 Munakata, Japan Futures Hard Poland Michal Przysiezny United States Troy Hahn
United States Michael Yani
5-7, 5-7
Win 5-5 Jun 2006 Munakata, Japan Futures Hard Japan Hiroyasu Sato Japan Hiroki Kondo
Japan Takahiro Terachi
walkover
Loss 5-6 Jul 2006 Dublin, Ireland Futures Carpet Latvia Andis Ju?ka France Jean-François Bachelot
France Nicolas Tourte
6-7(4-7), 1-6
Win 1-1 Jul 2006 Oberstaufen, Germany Challenger Clay Latvia Ernests Gulbis Romania Teodor-Dacian Cr?ciun
Romania Gabriel Moraru
6-1, 6-1
Loss 1-2 Sep 2006 Freudenstadt, Germany Challenger Clay France Alexandre Sidorenko Germany Tomas Behrend
Germany Dominik Meffert
5-7, 6-7(5-7)
Win 2-2 Nov 2006 Aachen, Germany Challenger Carpet (i) Latvia Ernests Gulbis Poland Tomasz Bednarek
Georgia (country) Irakli Labadze
6-7(5-7), 6-4, [10-8]
Loss 2-3 Nov 2006 Shrewsbury, United Kingdom Challenger Hard (i) Germany Lars Burgsmüller Germany Philipp Marx
Denmark Frederik Nielsen
4-6, 4-6
Win 3-3 Jun 2007 Karlsruhe, Germany Challenger Clay United States Alex Kuznetsov Germany Michael Berrer
Portugal Frederico Gil
6-4, 6-7(6-8), [10-4]
Win 4-3 Jun 2007 Surbiton, United Kingdom Challenger Grass United States Alex Kuznetsov United Kingdom James Auckland
Australia Stephen Huss
2-6, 6-3, [10-6]
Loss 4-4 Jul 2007 Dublin, Ireland Challenger Carpet Germany Lars Burgsmüller India Rohan Bopanna
Australia Adam Feeney
2-6, 2-6
Loss 4-5 Nov 2007 Aachen, Germany Challenger Carpet (i) Germany Dominik Meffert Germany Philipp Petzschner
Austria Alexander Peya
3-6, 2-6
Loss 4-6 Nov 2007 Bratislava, Slovaki Challengera Hard (i) South Africa Chris Haggard Czech Republic Tomá? Cibulec
Czech Republic Jaroslav Levinský
4-6, 6-2, [8-10]
Loss 4-7 Jul 2012 Marburg, Germany Challenger Clay Russia Denis Matsukevich Poland Mateusz Kowalczyk
Czech Republic David ?koch
2-6, 1-6
Loss 5-7 Oct 2012 Mansfield, United States Futures Hard United States Alex Kuznetsov United States Vahid Mirzadeh
United States Ryan Rowe
2-6, 7-6(7-5), [7-10]
Win 5-7 Nov 2012 Knoxville, United States Challenger Hard (i) United States Alex Kuznetsov South Africa Jean Andersen
South Africa Izak van der Merwe
6-4, 6-2
Win 6-7 Feb 2013 Dallas, United States Challenger Hard (i) United States Alex Kuznetsov United States Tennys Sandgren
United States Rhyne Williams
6-4, 6-7(4-7), [10-5]

Performance timelines

Key
W  F  SF QF #R RR Q# A P Z# PO G F-S SF-B NMS NH
(W) Won; (F) finalist; (SF) semifinalist; (QF) quarterfinalist; (#R) rounds 4, 3, 2, 1; (RR) round-robin stage; (Q#) qualification round; (A) absent; (Z#) Davis/Fed Cup Zonal Group (with number indication) or (PO) play-off; (G) gold, (F-S) silver or (SF-B) bronze Olympic medal; a (NMS) downgraded Masters Series/1000 tournament; (NH) not held. SR=strike rate (events won/competed)
To avoid confusion and double counting, these charts are updated at the conclusion of a tournament or when the player's participation has ended.

Current through the 2019 ATP Tour.

Singles

Doubles

Record against other players

Record against top-10 players

Zverev's match record against players who have been ranked in the Top 10, with those who are active in boldface. Includes only ATP Tour main draw matches.[8]

Top 10 wins

  • He has a 7-25 (21.9%) record against players who were, at the time the match was played, ranked in the top 10.
Year 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 Total
Wins 0 0 0 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 7
# Player Rank Event Surface Rd Score MZ Rank
2008
1. Spain David Ferrer 5 Rotterdam Open, Netherlands Hard (i) 2R 6-2, 7-5 98
2009
2. France Gilles Simon 7 Rome Masters, Italy Clay 3R 6-4, 6-1 76
3. France Gilles Simon 7 Stuttgart MercedesCup, Germany Clay 2R 6-4, 6-2 45
2010
4. Russia Nikolay Davydenko 6 Shanghai Masters, China Hard 2R 6-4, 7-6(7-3) 118
2016
5. Switzerland Stan Wawrinka 3 Basel Swiss Indoors, Switzerland Hard (i) QF 6-2, 5-7, 6-1 72
2017
6. United Kingdom Andy Murray 1 Australian Open, Melbourne, Australia Hard 4R 7-5, 5-7, 6-2, 6-4 50
7. Japan Kei Nishikori 9 Geneva Open, Switzerland Clay SF 6-4, 3-6, 6-3 33

Records

The following record was attained during the Open Era.

Time span Record Players matched
2016 10 times qualified for an ATP Tour main draw in 1 season.[9] Stands alone

Notes

  1. ^ Russian: ? , tr. Mikhail Aleksandrovich Zverev

References

  1. ^ "Mischa Zverev". ATP World Tour. Retrieved 2019.
  2. ^ "Another shock rocks the Open as Sir Andy crashes out". The Roar. 23 January 2017. Retrieved 2017.
  3. ^ "Mischa Zverev upsets No. 1 Andy Murray at Australian Open". Los Angeles Times. 22 January 2017. Retrieved 2017.
  4. ^ "Zverev Brothers Into Halle Doubles Final". ATP World. 25 June 2017. Retrieved 2017.
  5. ^ "Wimbledon 2017: Bernard Tomic loses limply to Mischa Zverev". Herald Sun. 4 July 2017.
  6. ^ "Mischa Zverev fined record $45,000 for poor performance". The Guardian. Retrieved 2018.
  7. ^ "Eastbourne 2018: Mischa Zverev beats Lukas Lacko to claim first ATP title". BBC. 30 June 2018.
  8. ^ "Mischa Zverev VS Juan Carlos Ferrero - Head 2 Head". ATP World Tour. Retrieved 2018.
  9. ^ "Mischa Zverev: Back From Rock Bottom". ATP World. 29 October 2016.

External links


  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

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