Mississippi Highway 389
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Mississippi Highway 389

Mississippi Highway 389 marker

Mississippi Highway 389
MS 389 highlighted in red
Route information
Maintained by MDOT
Length25.126 mi[1] (40.436 km)
Existedc. 1957-present
Southern segment
Length11.9 mi[2] (19.2 km)
South end in Starkville
Major
junctions
/ in Starkville
North endPheba-Beasley Road south of Pheba
Northern segment
Length13.2 mi[3] (21.2 km)
South end west of Montpelier
Major
junctions
north of Sparta
North end in Houston
Location
CountiesOktibbeha, Clay, Chickasaw
Highway system
->

Mississippi Highway 389 (MS 389) is a state highway that runs from south to north in the U.S. State of Mississippi. MS 389 currently exists in two sections. The southern section begins at MS 182 in Starkville. The road travels north out of the city, and crosses U.S. Route 82 (US 82) and MS 15. North of Starkville, the route continues northwestwards and ends at the Oktibbeha-Clay county line south of Pheba. The northern section starts at MS 46 west of Montpelier, and it travels north to cross the Natchez Trace Parkway in Chickasaw County. MS 389 ends at MS 8 in Houston.

MS 389 was designated in two segments around 1957, one from US 82 in Starkville to MS 50 in Pheba, and another from MS 46 west of Montpelier to MS 8 south of Houston. The route was realigned to connect directly to Houston ten years later. The route was fully paved in asphalt by 1971. The two sections were connected together by 1992, when the route was between MS 46 and MS 50. The same portion of the route was returned to county maintenance by 2000, along with the portion from the Oktibbeha-Clay County line to MS 50, leaving MS 389 in two segments again.

Route description

Traffic volume on Mississippi Highway 389
Location Volume
North of MS 182 9,900
South of Woodlawn Road 6,600
Southwest of Sun Creek Road 2,600
West of Murray Road 1,300
North of Maben Bell Schoolhouse Road 1,500
North of Hill Circle Road 1,100
North of CR 83 980
North of Seay Drive 2,200
South of Church Street 4,600
  • Data was measured in 2018 in terms of AADT
  • Source: Mississippi Department of Transportation[4]

MS 389 is split in two segments, with one located in northern Oktibbeha,[5] and the other in northwestern Clay and southern Chickasaw counties.[6][7] The route is legally defined in Mississippi Code § 65-3-3,[8] and it is maintained by the Mississippi Department of Transportation as part of the Mississippi State Highway System.[1]

MS 389 starts at its intersection with MS 182, also known as Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Drive, and Jackson Street near downtown Starkville.[9] The route, continuing as Jackson Street, travels north into the suburbs around the city, and intersects the entrance to Montcrief Park. MS 389 then intersects Hospital Road, which leads to several medical facilities including the Oktibbeha County Hospital. The road turns northwest at Garrard Road, traveling into the outskirts of Starkville.[2] The road then crosses US 82 and MS 25 at a diamond interchange, and exits the city limits of Starkville.[9] Traveling through rural areas of Oktibbeha County, the route crosses Trim Cane Creek near Sun Creek Road, which travels to the unincorporated area of Plairs. MS 389 turns westward at Bells and continues in that direction until it reaches County Lake Road. At Maben Bell Schoolhouse Road, it resumes traveling north. The road crosses the Clay-Oktibbeha county line at Six Mile Creek,[5] and state maintenance ends north of the bridge.[10] The road continues as Pheba-Beasley Road, which travels through Pheba and ends at MS 46 in Beasley.[2]

The northern segment starts at a T-intersection with MS 46 west of Montpelier in Clay County, and it travels north-northwestwards from that point. The road intersects Hill Circle Road before entering Chickasaw County.[6] Once inside the county, the route meets County Road 419 (CR 419) at Sparta. MS 389 turns north at CR 83, and crosses Cane Creek and its tributary, Chewawah Creek.[7] Continuing across farmland,[3] the road turns northwest near CR 85, and crosses over the Natchez Trace Parkway at a quadrant roadway intersection. MS 389 turns north at CR 80, and it travels through the community of Sonora near CR 93. The route passes by CR 108, which connects to MS 15.[7] MS 389 enters the city limits of Houston near CR 106.[11] Inside the city, the road is known as West Point Road, and it travels towards the center of the town. At its five-way intersection with McWhorter Street, South Jackson Street, and Woodland Circle, the route continues northward along South Jackson Street.[3] MS 389 travels northwards and ends at MS 8 at the center of Houston.[7] The road continues as North Jackson Street, which travels to MS 15 north of Houston.[11]

History

In May 1955, a project was announced to construct culverts and a temporary 3.458-mile (5.565 km) gravel road from Houston to Montpelier, with the road given the designation of MS 389.[12] A surfacing project began in November 1956 for the same section.[13] Around 1957, the MS 389 designation appeared along two roads in eastern Mississippi; one from US 82 and MS 25 in Starkville to MS 10 in Pheba, and another from MS 46 near Montpelier to MS 15 south of Houston. The sections near Pheba and in Chickasaw County were paved in asphalt, the remaining sections were laid with gravel.[14][15] MS 10 was renumbered to MS 50 by 1960,[16][17] and projects to construct three bridges and grading, drainage, and gravel surfacing along 3.4-mile (5.5 km) section of MS 389 in Oktibbeha County began.[18] A section of Natchez Trace Parkway was constructed through MS 389 by 1962.[17][19] The southern segment from Starkville to Pheba was paved by 1965,[20][21] after the $435,607 (equivalent to $3,590,953 in 2019) project was announced in the previous year.[22]

Two years later, the route was rerouted into Houston, and a small section near Montpelier was paved.[21][23] The entire route was paved in asphalt by 1971.[24][25] The two segments were connected by 1992 with a new route between MS 50 and MS 46[26][27] In May 2000, the section from the Clay-Oktibbeha county line to Montpelier was removed from the state highway system, and it was turned over to the Board of Supervisors of Clay County.[28] By 2006, a bypass around Starkville was completed, and US 82 and MS 25 were rerouted onto the new highway. A new interchange was built at MS 389 as a result, and the southern terminus of the southern segment was changed to MS 182.[29][30]

Major intersections

Intersection of MS 46 and MS 389 near Montpelier
CountyLocationmi[1][2][3]kmDestinationsNotes
OktibbehaStarkville0.00.0 (Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Drive)Southern terminus of the southern section
2.1-
2.3
3.4-
3.7
/ Diamond interchange
Oktibbeha-Clay
county line
11.919.2Pheba-Beasley RoadNorthern terminus of the southern section
Gap in route
Clay11.919.2 - Montpelier, Starkville, ManteeSouthern terminus of the northern section
Chickasaw19.731.7 - Tupelo, JacksonGrade-separated interchange
Houston25.140.4 (Madison Street) to  - Aberdeen, Grenada, VardamanNorthern terminus of the northern section
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

References

Route map:

KML is not from Wikidata
  1. ^ a b c Mississippi Department of Transportation Planning Division (December 31, 2017). Mississippi Public Roads Selected Statistics Extent, Travel, and Designation (PDF) (Report). Mississippi Department of Transportation. p. 163. Retrieved 2019.
  2. ^ a b c d Google (December 10, 2019). "Mississippi Highway 389 - Southern segment" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved 2019.
  3. ^ a b c d Google (December 10, 2019). "Mississippi Highway 389 - Northern segment" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved 2019.
  4. ^ Mississippi Department of Transportation (2018). "MDOT Traffic Count Application". Mississippi Department of Transportation. Retrieved 2019.
  5. ^ a b Mississippi Department of Transportation (2018). Oktibbeha County, Mississippi (PDF) (Map). c. 1:55,000. Jackson: Mississippi Department of Transportation. Retrieved 2019.
  6. ^ a b Mississippi Department of Transportation (2018). Clay County, Mississippi (PDF) (Map). c. 1:60,000. Jackson: Mississippi Department of Transportation. Retrieved 2019.
  7. ^ a b c d Mississippi Department of Transportation (2018). Chickasaw County, Mississippi (PDF) (Map). c. 1:60,000. Jackson: Mississippi Department of Transportation. Retrieved 2019.
  8. ^ Mississippi Legislature. "Sec. 65-3-3: State Highways Designated". Mississippi Code of 1972 as Amended. Mississippi Legislature. Retrieved 2019 – via LexisNexis.
  9. ^ a b Mississippi Department of Transportation (2013). Starkville, Mississippi (PDF) (Map). c. 1:23,220. Mississippi Department of Transportation. Retrieved 2019.
  10. ^ Mississippi Department of Transportation (June 2018). Begin/End State Maintenance (Traffic sign). Pheba, Mississippi: Mississippi Department of Transportation. Retrieved 2019 – via Google Street View.
  11. ^ a b Mississippi Department of Transportation (2007). Houston, Mississippi (PDF) (Map). c. 1:20,004. Mississippi Department of Transportation. Retrieved 2019.
  12. ^ "Mississippi State Highway Department Notice to Contractors". The Clarion-Ledger. Jackson, Mississippi. May 17, 1955. p. 3. Retrieved 2020.Free to read
  13. ^ "Bids Due on 11 Projects November 20". The Clarion-Ledger. Jackson, Mississippi. November 8, 1956. p. 6. Retrieved 2020.Free to read
  14. ^ Mississippi State Highway Commission (1956). Official Road Map State of Mississippi (PDF) (Map). Jackson: Mississippi State Highway Commission. Retrieved 2019.
  15. ^ Mississippi State Highway Commission (1957). Official Road Map State of Mississippi (PDF) (Map). Jackson: Mississippi State Highway Commission. Retrieved 2019.
  16. ^ Mississippi State Highway Commission (1958). Official Road Map State of Mississippi (PDF) (Map). Jackson: Mississippi State Highway Commission. Retrieved 2019.
  17. ^ a b Mississippi State Highway Commission (1960). Official Road Map State of Mississippi (PDF) (Map). Jackson: Mississippi State Highway Commission. Retrieved 2019.
  18. ^ "Highway Bids Due On 13 New Projects". The Clarion-Ledger. Jackson, Mississippi. July 12, 1960. p. 5. Retrieved 2020.Free to read
  19. ^ Mississippi State Highway Commission (1962). Road Map State of Mississippi (PDF) (Map). Jackson: Mississippi State Highway Commission. Retrieved 2019.
  20. ^ Mississippi State Highway Commission (1964). Official Road Map State of Mississippi (PDF) (Map). Jackson: Mississippi State Highway Commission. Retrieved 2019.
  21. ^ a b Mississippi State Highway Commission (1965). Official Road Map State of Mississippi (PDF) (Map). Jackson: Mississippi State Highway Commission. Retrieved 2019.
  22. ^ "Road Contracts Let For $13.9 Million". The Clarion-Ledger. Jackson, Mississippi. United Press International. January 30, 1964. p. 5. Retrieved 2020.Free to read
  23. ^ Mississippi State Highway Department (1967). Official Road Map State of Mississippi (PDF) (Map). Jackson: Mississippi State Highway Department. Retrieved 2019.
  24. ^ Mississippi State Highway Department (1970). Official Road Map (PDF) (Map). Jackson: Mississippi State Highway Department. Retrieved 2019.
  25. ^ Mississippi State Highway Department (1971). Official Highway Map (PDF) (Map). Jackson: Mississippi State Highway Department. Retrieved 2019.
  26. ^ Mississippi State Highway Department (1991). Official Highway Map of Mississippi (PDF) (Map). Jackson: Mississippi State Highway Department. Retrieved 2019.
  27. ^ Mississippi State Highway Department (1992). Official Highway Map of Mississippi (PDF) (Map). Jackson: Mississippi State Highway Department. Retrieved 2019.
  28. ^ "Deletion from state highway system". Mississippi Code Annotated § 65-3-135,No. 562ofMay 20, 2000. Retrieved 2019.
  29. ^ Mississippi Department of Transportation (2004). Official Highway Map of Mississippi (PDF) (Map) (2004-05 ed.). Jackson: Mississippi Department of Transportation. Retrieved 2019.
  30. ^ Mississippi Department of Transportation (2006). Official Highway Map of Mississippi (PDF) (Map). Jackson: Mississippi Department of Transportation. Retrieved 2019.

  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

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