Murchison Falls
Get Murchison Falls essential facts below. View Videos or join the Murchison Falls discussion. Add Murchison Falls to your PopFlock.com topic list for future reference or share this resource on social media.
Murchison Falls

Murchison Falls, also known as Kabalega Falls, is a waterfall between Lake Kyoga and Lake Albert on the Victoria Nile in Uganda. At the top of Murchison Falls, the Nile forces its way through a gap in the rocks, only 7 m (23 ft) wide, and tumbles 43 m (141 ft), before flowing westward into Lake Albert. The outlet of Lake Victoria sends around 300 cubic meters per second (11,000 ft³/s) of water over the falls, squeezed into a gorge less than 10 m (33 ft) wide.

Samuel Baker and Florence Baker were the first Europeans who sighted them.[1] Baker named them after Roderick Murchison, the President of the Royal Geographical Society.[2] The falls lend their name to the surrounding Murchison Falls National Park.

During the regime of Idi Amin in the 1970s, the name was changed to Kabalega Falls, after the Omukama (King) Kabalega of Bunyoro, although this was never legally promulgated. The name reverted to Murchison Falls following the downfall of Idi Amin.[3] It is still sometimes referred to as Kabalega Falls.[2]

Ernest Hemingway crashed a plane just downriver from Murchison Falls in 1954.[4] In August 2019, Uganda rejected a hydropower project by South Africa's Bonang Power and Energy. The reason was that Murchison Falls is one of the country's lucrative tourism sites.[5]

Gallery

See also

References

  1. ^ Middleton, Dorothy. "Baker, Florence Barbara Maria, Lady Baker (1841-1916)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/42346.(Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  2. ^ a b "Murchison Falls". Archived from the original on 2007-06-18. Retrieved .CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link)
  3. ^ "United Nations Environment Programme". Archived from the original on 2007-09-30. Retrieved .
  4. ^ "Murchison Falls National Park, Uganda Safaris, Murchison Falls Safari and Tours in Uganda". Murchison Falls National Park Uganda. Retrieved 2014.
  5. ^ "Uganda rejects planned power plant at Murchison Falls". Reuters. 2019-08-28. Retrieved .

External links


  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

Murchison_Falls
 



 



 
Music Scenes