North Carolina's 11th Congressional District
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North Carolina's 11th Congressional District

North Carolina's 11th congressional district
United States Congressional Districts in North Carolina, 2021 - 2023.tif
North Carolina's 11th congressional district since November 15, 2019
Representative
Distribution
  • 53.4% rural[1]
  • 46.6% urban
Population (2018)768,166[2]
Median household
income
$47,579[2]
Ethnicity
Cook PVIR+14[3]

North Carolina's 11th congressional district encompasses most of Western North Carolina. Starting in the 113th Congress, it was last represented by Mark Meadows, a Republican. He replaced Democrat Heath Shuler, who retired in 2013. Shuler had won the seat in the 2006 midterm elections, defeating 8-term Republican Representative Charles H. Taylor. After a court-supervised 2019 redistricting, Meadows announced in December that he will not run for re-election in 2020,[4] and on March 30 he resigned to become White House Chief of Staff.[5]

Redistricting

The 11th district has historically been known for its volatile politics and was once considered one of the most competitive congressional districts in North Carolina. It was traditionally anchored by the heavily Democratic city of Asheville, with the rest of the district being split between Democratic-leaning counties in the south and Republican-leaning counties in the north. Consequently, congressional races were historically hard-fought and often very close.

In 2011, the Republican-controlled legislature redrew the district, shifting much of Asheville to the 10th district, where the city's Democratic tilt was diluted by the overwhelming Republican inclination of the rest of the district. The new map split Asheville in such a way that in some neighborhoods, one side of the street moved to the 10th while the other side of the street stayed in the 11th.[6]

To make-up for the loss in population, the 11th absorbed some strongly Republican territory in the Foothills which had previously been in the 10th. On paper, it was one of the most Republican districts in the state. Due to the district becoming much more conservative, three-term Democratic incumbent Heath Shuler did not run for reelection in 2012, and was succeeded by Republican Mark Meadows.

In 2019, a panel of North Carolina judges ruled that the existing map was a partisan gerrymander, and ordered new congressional districts to be drawn ahead of the 2020 election.[7] After review in December, a new map was approved. The current district includes the western part of Rutherford County and the entirety of Avery, Buncombe, Cherokee, Clay, Graham, Haywood, Henderson, Jackson, Macon, Madison, McDowell, Mitchell, Polk, Swain, Transylvania, and Yancey Counties.[8][3]

  • The Cook PVI listed will need be updated to reflect the redrawn District 11. The new district leans Republican, but much less than before, as it once again includes all of strongly Democratic Asheville.

List of members representing the district

Name Party Years Cong
ress
Electoral history District location
District created March 4, 1803.
James Holland Democratic-Republican March 4, 1803 -
March 3, 1811
8th
9th
10th
11th
Redistricted from the 1st district and re-elected in 1803.
Re-elected in 1804.
Re-elected in 1806.
Re-elected in 1808.
Retired.
1803-1813
[data unknown/missing]
Pickensisrael.jpg
Israel Pickens
Democratic-Republican March 4, 1811 -
March 3, 1813
12th Elected in 1810.
Redistricted to the 12th district.
Peter Forney Democratic-Republican March 4, 1813 -
March 3, 1815
13th Elected in 1813.
Retired.
1813-1823
[data unknown/missing]
Daniel M. Forney Democratic-Republican March 4, 1815 -
1818
14th
15th
Elected in 1815.
Re-elected in 1817.
Resigned.
William Davidson Federalist December 2, 1818 -
March 3, 1821
15th
16th
Elected November 7, 1818 to finish Forney's term and seated December 2, 1818.
Re-elected in 1819.
Lost re-election.
Henry W. Connor Democratic-Republican[a] March 4, 1821 -
March 3, 1825
17th
18th
19th
20th
21st
22nd
23rd
24th
25th
26th
Elected in 1821.
Re-elected in 1823.
Re-elected in 1825.
Re-elected in 1827.
Re-elected in 1829.
[data unknown/missing]
1823-1833
[data unknown/missing]
Jacksonian March 4, 1825 -
March 3, 1837
1833-1843
[data unknown/missing]
Democratic March 4, 1837 -
March 3, 1841
Greene W. Caldwell Democratic March 4, 1841 -
March 3, 1843
27th [data unknown/missing]
District inactive March 4, 1843 -
March 3, 1933
ZebulonWeaver.jpg
Zebulon Weaver
Democratic March 4, 1933 -
January 3, 1943
73rd
74th
75th
76th
77th
Redistricted from the 10th district and re-elected in 1932.
Re-elected in 1934.
Re-elected in 1936.
Re-elected in 1938.
Re-elected in 1940.
Redistricted to the 12th district.
1933-1943
[data unknown/missing]
Alfred Bulwinkle.png
Alfred L. Bulwinkle
Democratic January 3, 1943 -
August 31, 1950
78th
79th
80th
81st
Redistricted from the 10th district and re-elected in 1942.
Re-elected in 1944.
Re-elected in 1946.
Re-elected in 1948.
Died.
1943-1953
[data unknown/missing]
Vacant August 31, 1950 -
November 7, 1950
Woodrow Jones.jpg
Woodrow W. Jones
Democratic November 7, 1950 -
January 3, 1957
81st
82nd
83rd
84th
Elected to finish Bulwinkle's term.
Also elected in 1950 to the next term.
Re-elected in 1952.
Re-elected in 1954.
[data unknown/missing]
1953-1963
[data unknown/missing]
BasilLeeWhitener.jpg
Basil Whitener
Democratic January 3, 1957 -
January 3, 1963
85th
86th
87th
Elected in 1956.
Re-elected in 1958.
Re-elected in 1960.
Redistricted to the 10th district.
Roy A. Taylor 93rd Congress 1973.jpg
Roy A. Taylor
Democratic January 3, 1963 -
January 3, 1977
88th
89th
90th
91st
92nd
93rd
94th
Redistricted from the 12th district and re-elected in 1962.
Re-elected in 1964.
Re-elected in 1966.
Re-elected in 1968.
Re-elected in 1970.
Re-elected in 1972.
Re-elected in 1974.
[data unknown/missing]
1963-1973
[data unknown/missing]
1973-1983
[data unknown/missing]
V. Lamar Gudger.jpg
V. Lamar Gudger
Democratic January 3, 1977 -
January 3, 1981
95th
96th
Elected in 1976.
Re-elected in 1978.
Lost re-election.
Bill Hendon.png
Bill Hendon
Republican January 3, 1981 -
January 3, 1983
97th Elected in 1980.
Lost re-election.
James M Clarke.png
James M. Clarke
Democratic January 3, 1983 -
January 3, 1985
98th Elected in 1982.
Lost re-election.
1983-1993
[data unknown/missing]
Bill Hendon.png
Bill Hendon
Republican January 3, 1985 -
January 3, 1987
99th Elected in 1984.
Lost re-election.
James M Clarke.png
James M. Clarke
Democratic January 3, 1987 -
January 3, 1991
100th
101st
Elected in 1986.
Re-elected in 1988.
Lost re-election.
Taylor-nc11.jpg
Charles H. Taylor
Republican January 3, 1991 -
January 3, 2007
102nd
103rd
104th
105th
106th
107th
108th
109th
Elected in 1990.
Re-elected in 1992.
Re-elected in 1994.
Re-elected in 1996.
Re-elected in 1998.
Re-elected in 2000.
Re-elected in 2002.
Re-elected in 2004.
Lost re-election.
1993-2003
[data unknown/missing]
2003-2013
NC-Congress-11.PNG
Heathshuler.jpg
Heath Shuler
Democratic January 3, 2007 -
January 3, 2013
110th
111th
112th
Elected in 2006.
Re-elected in 2008.
Re-elected in 2010.
Retired.
Mark Meadows, Official Portrait, 113th Congress.jpg
Mark Meadows
Republican January 3, 2013 -
March 30, 2020
113th
114th
115th
116th
Elected in 2012.
Re-elected in 2014.
Re-elected in 2016.
Re-elected in 2018.
Resigned to become White House Chief of Staff.[5]
2013-2020
North Carolina US Congressional District 11 (since 2013).tif
Vacant March 30, 2020 -
January 3, 2021
116th
Madison Cawthorn Republican January 3, 2021 -
117th Elected in 2020 2021-
United States Congressional Districts in North Carolina, 2021 - 2023.tif

Notes

  1. ^ Supported the Jackson faction in the 1824 United States presidential election.
  1. ^ "Congressional Districts Relationship Files (State-based)". census.gov. Archived from the original on April 2, 2013.
  2. ^ a b "Congressional District 11 (116th Congress), North Carolina". census.gov. People for population, Socio-Economic for median income
  3. ^ a b "HB 1029, 3rd Edition". ncleg.gov.
  4. ^ McPherson, Lindsey (December 29, 2019). "North Carolina's Mark Meadows won't run for reelection". Roll Call. Washington, D.C. Retrieved 2019.
  5. ^ a b Burgess, Joel. "North Carolina's Mark Meadows will leave Congress early for White House post". Retrieved 2020.
  6. ^ Timm, Jane (September 9, 2017). "They're Still Drawing Crazy-Looking Districts. Can't It Be Stopped?". NBC News.
  7. ^ CNN, Paul LeBlanc. "North Carolina judges throw out congressional map ahead of 2020 elections". CNN.
  8. ^ "NC House Bill H1029 - Ratified" (PDF). NC Legislature. November 15, 2019.

References

External links

Coordinates: 35°33?12?N 82°47?16?W / 35.55333°N 82.78778°W / 35.55333; -82.78778


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