Patrik Andersson
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Patrik Andersson

Patrik Andersson
Patrik Andersson.jpg
Patrik Andersson at Svenska idrottsgalan in January 2013
Personal information
Full name Patrik Jonas Andersson
Date of birth (1971-08-18) 18 August 1971 (age 49)
Place of birth Bjärred, Sweden
Height 1.85 m (6 ft 1 in)[1]
Playing position(s) Defender
Youth career
0000-1988 Bjärreds IF
1988-1989 Malmö FF
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1989-1992 Malmö FF 90 (11)
1992-1993 Blackburn Rovers 12 (0)
1993-1999 Borussia Mönchengladbach 174 (10)
1999-2001 Bayern Munich 35 (1)
2001-2004 Barcelona 19 (0)
2004-2005 Malmö FF 19 (1)
Total 349 (23)
National team
1987-88 Sweden U17 23 (7)
1989-91 Sweden U19 9 (6)
1990-92 Sweden U21 16 (3)
1992 Sweden Olympic 4 (1)
1992-2002 Sweden 96 (3)
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only

Patrik Jonas Andersson (pronounced ['p:tr?k 'ân:d?n]; born 18 August 1971) is a Swedish former footballer who played as a defender. Starting off his career with Malmö FF in the late 1980s, he went on to play abroad in England, Germany, and Spain, winning the 2000-01 UEFA Champions League with FC Bayern Munich. He returned to Malmö FF in 2004 before retiring the following season.

Andersson won 96 caps for the Sweden national team, representing them at two UEFA European Championships and two FIFA World Cups, helping Sweden finish third at the 1994 FIFA World Cup.

Club career

Early career

Born in Bjärred, Andersson began his career with the local club, Bjärreds IF. In 1988, he moved on to Malmö FF, a team playing in the top national league.

Blackburn Rovers

In December 1992, Andersson went professional as he moved to Blackburn Rovers for a fee of £800,000,[2][3] where he stayed for one year, making just 12 Premier League appearances. However, he is notable for being one of the first foreign signings by Blackburn Rovers, and one of the relatively small group of foreigners who appeared in the first season of the new Premier League in England.[3] He scored once for Blackburn, in a 2-1 defeat to Sheffield Wednesday in the second leg of the 1992-93 Football League Cup semi-final.[4]

Borussia Mönchengladbach

His next step was to go to Germany in October 1993[5] and play for Borussia Mönchengladbach. There he won the DFB-Pokal with the team in 1995, but left the team as its performance deteriorated, in 1999.

Bayern Munich

In June 1999, Andersson signed for Bayern Munich for approximately DM 6 million.[6] He made his debut on 22 August 1999 in a 2-0 away defeat to Bayer Leverkusen. His time with Bayern resulted in two Bundesliga championships (in the 2000-01 championship season he scored the final and decisive goal against Hamburger SV in the last minute[7] - his only goal for the club) as well as a DFB-Pokal and victory in the 2000-01 UEFA Champions League,[8] despite missing his penalty in the final shootout.[9]

FC Barcelona

Andersson moved to La Liga giants FC Barcelona in 2001 and spent three injury-plagued seasons there. Therefore he played only 19 league matches for the Blaugrana.[10]

Malmö FF

For the 2004 season, Andersson came back to Malmö FF to play in the Swedish league again after 10 years. This year he captained Malmö FF who won their first Swedish league (Allsvenskan) title in 15 years. He has twice been awarded Guldbollen as the Swedish footballer of the year, in 1995 and 2001. After suffering yet another knee injury during a Champions League qualifier against Swiss team FC Thun on 10 August 2005,[11] Andersson announced his retirement from professional football on 12 August 2005. He was appointed as Manchester United's scout in Scandinavia in August 2010.[12]

International career

Andersson earned a total of 96 caps for the Swedish national team, scoring three goals.[13] He won a bronze medal in the 1994 FIFA World Cup. Andersson also played in the team that reached the semi-finals at UEFA Euro 1992. He was also part of the Swedish national squad that took part in Euro 2000, the 2002 FIFA World Cup and was a member of the Swedish squad that competed at the 1992 Summer Olympics in Barcelona.[14] At Euro 2000, he received a red card for a hard foul on Belgium's Bart Goor.[15] At the 2002 World Cup, in Sweden's last training session before their opening match against England, Andersson was injured and was not able to play in the tournament. He was replaced by Andreas Jakobsson.

Personal life

Andersson is the son of Roy Andersson, who played more than 300 games for Malmö FF and won 20 caps for the Sweden national team, representing them at the 1978 FIFA World Cup.[16] His brother is Daniel Andersson, also a former professional footballer and Sweden international.[17]

Career statistics

Club

[16]

Club Season League Cup League Cup Continental Total
Division Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals
Malmö FF 1989 Allsvenskan 15 1 - 4 0 19 1
1990 20 2 - 4 0 24 2
1991 28 1 - - 28 1
1992 27 7 - - 27 7
Total 90 11 - 8 0 98 11
Blackburn Rovers 1992-93 Premier League 11 0 - 11 0
1993-94 1 0 - 1 0
Total 12 0 - 12 0
Borussia
Mönchengladbach
1993-94 Bundesliga 17 1 0 0 - - 17 1
1994-95 34 1 6 0 1 0 - 41 1
1995-96 33 4 2 0 - 6 0 41 4
1996-97 32 1 2 0 - 4 1 38 2
1997-98 30 3 1 0 - - 31 3
1998-99 28 0 3 0 - - 31 0
Total 174 10 14 0 1 0 10 1 199 11
Bayern Munich 1999-2000 Bundesliga 15 0 5 0 2 0 9 0 31 0
2000-01 20 1 1 0 2 0 12 0 35 1
Total 35 1 6 0 4 0 21 0 66 1
Barcelona 2001-02 La Liga 12 0 1 0 - 6 1 19 1
2002-03 3 0 0 0 - 4 0 7 0
2003-04 4 0 1 0 - 0 0 5 0
Total 19 0 2 0 - 10 1 31 1
Malmö FF 2004 Allsvenskan 10 1 - - 10 1
2005 9 0 - 3 0 12 0
Total 19 1 - 11 0 22 1
Career totals 349 23 22 0 5 0 53 2 428 25

International

National team Season Apps Goals
Sweden 1992 11 0
1993 7 0
1994 15 1
1995 7 0
1996 8 1
1997 9 0
1998 7 0
1999 9 0
2000 10 0
2001 10 1
2002 3 0
Total 96 3

International goals

Scores and results list Sweden's goal tally first.
# Date Venue Opponent Score Result Competition
1 17 August 1994 Eyravallen, Örebro  Lithuania 3-0 4-2 Friendly
2 1 June 1996 Råsunda Stadium, Solna  Belarus 4-1 5-1 1998 World Cup qualifier
3 1 September 2001 Gradski Stadion, Skopje  North Macedonia 2-0 2-1 2002 World Cup qualifier

Honours

Club

Borussia Mönchengladbach

Bayern Munich

Malmö FF

Individual

References

  1. ^ "Andersson, Patrik". kicker.de (in German). Retrieved 2010.
  2. ^ "Football: On the move". The Independent. 20 December 1992. Retrieved 2016.
  3. ^ a b "Boom and bust the Blackburn way". BBC. 13 May 1999. Retrieved 2010.
  4. ^ "Wembley date for Wednesday". The Independent. 14 March 1993. Retrieved 2015.
  5. ^ "Borussia M'Gladbach 1993/94". skladyfutbol.pl. 1 February 2015. Archived from the original on 2 February 2015. Retrieved 2015.
  6. ^ Pfennig, Christian; Neußer, Joachim (7 June 1999). "Ribbeck stellt Matthäus EM-Freibrief aus" [Ribbeck provides Matthäus complete authority from the European Championship]. Rhein-Zeitung (in German). Retrieved 2016.
  7. ^ "Vier Minuten im Mai" (in German). sport1.de. 12 May 2009. Retrieved 2010.
  8. ^ "Patrik Andersson" (in German). fussballdaten.de. Retrieved 2010.
  9. ^ "Bayern crowned European champions". BBC Sport. 23 May 2001. Retrieved 2010.
  10. ^ Arnhold, Matthias (14 November 2019). "Patrik Jonas Andersson - Matches and Goals in Bundesliga". Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation. Retrieved 2019.
  11. ^ "Roundup:Doubts surround 2 league kickoffs". The New York Times. 12 August 2005. Retrieved 2010.
  12. ^ Ogden, Mark (24 August 2010). "Anderson makes successful return in Manchester United's £48m reserves". Telegraph.co.uk. Retrieved 2010.
  13. ^ Mamrud, Roberto (14 November 2019). "Patrik Andersson - International Appearances". Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation. Retrieved 2019.
  14. ^ "Patrik Andersson Biography and Statistics". Sports Reference. Archived from the original on 4 December 2009. Retrieved 2009.
  15. ^ "Belgium beat Sweden to start with a bang". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 6 October 2003. Retrieved 2010.[dead link]
  16. ^ a b "Patrik Andersson". level-k.com (in Japanese). Retrieved 2010.
  17. ^ "Svenske landslagshjältens superkropp - som 69-åring". www.expressen.se (in Swedish). Retrieved 2020.
  18. ^ "Bundesliga Historie 1994/95" (in German). kicker.
  19. ^ "Bundesliga Historie 1996/97" (in German). kicker.
  20. ^ "Team of the Year 2001". UEFA. 3 January 2002. Retrieved 2016.

External links


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