Quadrangle (geography)
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Quadrangle Geography
New York (Essex County) Mt. Marcy: an 1892 USGS quadrangle map (or topographic sheet) of the Mount Marcy area of the Adirondacks in New York State from the first decades of the United States Geological Survey.

A "quadrangle" is a United States Geological Survey (USGS) 7.5-minute map, which are usually named after a local physiographic feature. The shorthand "quad" is also used, especially with the name of the map; for example, "the Ranger Creek, Texas quad map". These maps are one-quarter of the older 15-minute series. On a quadrangle map, the north and south limits are not straight lines, but are actually curved to match Earth's lines of latitude on the standard projection.[clarification needed] The east and west limits are usually not parallel as they match Earth's lines of longitude. In the United States, a 7.5 minute quadrangle map covers an area of 49 to 70 square miles (130 to 180 km2).[1]

The surfaces of other planets have also been divided into quadrangles by the USGS. Martian quadrangles are also named after local features.[2]

Quadrangles that lie on the pole of a body are also sometimes called "areas" instead, since they are circular rather than four-sided.

See also

References

  1. ^ Map Scales, Fact Sheet FS105-02, (February 2002)
  2. ^ Morton, Oliver (2002). Mapping Mars: Science, Imagination, and the Birth of a World. New York: Picador USA. p. 98. ISBN 0-312-24551-3.

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Quadrangle_(geography)
 



 



 
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