Segunda Division
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Segunda Division

Segunda División
LaLiga SmartBank.svg
Founded1929 (1929)
CountrySpain
ConfederationUEFA
Number of teams22
Level on pyramid2
Promotion toPrimera División
Relegation toTercera División (1929-1977)
Segunda División B (1977-2021)
Primera División RFEF (2021-future)
Domestic cup(s)Copa del Rey
International cup(s)UEFA Europa League
(via winning Copa del Rey)
Current championsHuesca (1st title)
Most championshipsMurcia (8 titles)
TV partnersMovistar+
Gol
Websitelaliga.com
Current: 2020-21 Segunda División

The Campeonato Nacional de Liga de Segunda División,[a] commercially known as LaLiga 2[b] and stylized as LaLiga SmartBank for sponsorship reasons,[1] is the men's second professional association football division of the Spanish football league system. Administrated by the Liga de Fútbol Profesional, it is contested by 22 teams, with the top two teams plus the winner of a play-off promoted to LaLiga and replaced by the three lowest-placed teams in that division.

History

This championship was created in 1929 by the Royal Spanish Football Federation. The league has been national, single-table except for a period from 1949 to 1968 in which it was regionalized into two North and South groups. Since 1984 it has been organized by the Liga de Fútbol Profesional.

From 2006, the Liga de Fútbol Profesional had a ten-year sponsorship agreement with the banking group BBVA. Initially rebranded as Liga BBVA, the Segunda División was renamed Liga Adelante two years later, after the BBVA sponsorship was extended to the Primera División, which received the Liga BBVA name.[2] Another banking group, Banco Santander, took over the sponsorship of both divisions in 2016, upon which the Segunda División was renamed La Liga 1|2|3, before being renamed LaLiga Smartbank in time for the 2019-20 season.[3]

Since the 2010-11 season, a play-off has been played between the teams that finished 3rd to 6th (reserve teams are not eligible for promotion).

League format

The league contains 22 teams that play each other home and away for a 42-match season. Each year three teams are promoted to La Liga. The top two teams earn an automatic promotion. The third team to be promoted is the winner of a play-off between the teams that finished 3rd to 6th (reserve teams are not eligible for promotion). The play-offs comprise two-legged semi-finals followed by a two-legged final. The bottom four are relegated to Segunda División B.[4]

Stadia and locations

Location of Community of Madrid teams in 2020-21 Segunda División
Location of teams in 2020-21 Segunda División (Canary Islands)

Mallorca signed a sponsorship contract with Consell de Mallorca and other public entities for renaming their stadium as the Visit Mallorca Stadium.[5]


Team changes

All-time standings

The All-Time Segunda Table is an overall record of all match results, points, and goals of every team that has played in La Segunda División since its inception in 1929. The table that follows is accurate as of the end of the 2018-19 season.

League or status at 2019-20:

La Liga
Segunda División
Segunda División B
Tercera División
Divisiones Regionales
Suspended
No longer affiliated with RFEF
Club no longer exists

Segunda División seasons

Season Champions Runners-up Other Teams Promoted
1929 Sevilla[i] Iberia SC[i]
1929-30 Alavés Sporting Gijón[i]
1930-31 Valencia Sevilla[i]
1931-32 Betis Oviedo[i]
1932-33 Oviedo Atlético Madrid[i]
1933-34 Sevilla Atlético Madrid
1934-35 Hércules Osasuna
1935-36 Celta Vigo Zaragoza
1939-40 Murcia Deportivo La Coruña (not promoted)
1940-41 Granada Real Sociedad Castellón and Deportivo La Coruña
1941-42 Betis Zaragoza
1942-43 Sabadell Real Sociedad
1943-44 Sporting Gijón Murcia
1944-45 Alcoyano Hércules Celta Vigo
1945-46 Sabadell Deportivo La Coruña
1946-47 Alcoyano Gimnàstic Real Sociedad
1947-48 Valladolid Deportivo La Coruña
1948-49 Real Sociedad Málaga
Season Northern Group Winner Southern Group Winner Other teams promoted
1949-50 Racing Santander Alcoyano Lleida and Murcia
1950-51 Sporting Gijón Atlético Tetuán Zaragoza and Las Palmas
1951-52 Oviedo Málaga
1952-53 Osasuna Jaén
1953-54 Alavés Las Palmas Hércules and Málaga
1954-55 Cultural Leonesa Murcia
1955-56 Osasuna Jaén Zaragoza and Condal
1956-57 Sporting Gijón Granada
1957-58 Oviedo Betis
1958-59 Elche Valladolid
1959-60 Racing Santander Mallorca
1960-61 Osasuna Tenerife
1961-62 Deportivo La Coruña Córdoba Valladolid and Málaga
1962-63 Pontevedra Murcia Levante and Espanyol
1963-64 Deportivo La Coruña Las Palmas
1964-65 Pontevedra Mallorca Sabadell and Málaga
1965-66 Deportivo La Coruña Hércules Granada
1966-67 Real Sociedad Málaga Betis
1967-68 Deportivo La Coruña Granada
Season Champions Runner Up Other teams promoted
1968-69 Sevilla Celta Vigo Mallorca
1969-70 Sporting Gijón Málaga Espanyol
1970-71 Betis Burgos (I) Deportivo La Coruña and Córdoba
1971-72 Oviedo Castellón Zaragoza
1972-73 Murcia Elche Racing Santander
1973-74 Betis Hércules Salamanca
1974-75 Oviedo Racing Santander Sevilla
1975-76 Burgos (I) Celta Vigo Málaga
1976-77 Sporting Gijón Cádiz Rayo Vallecano
1977-78 Zaragoza Recreativo Celta Vigo
1978-79 AD Almería Málaga Betis
1979-80 Murcia Valladolid Osasuna
1980-81 Castellón Cádiz Racing Santander
1981-82 Celta Vigo Salamanca Málaga
1982-83 Murcia Cádiz Mallorca
1983-84 Castilla[ii] Bilbao Athletic[ii] Hércules, Racing Santander and Elche
1984-85 Las Palmas Cádiz Celta Vigo
1985-86 Murcia Sabadell Mallorca
1986-87 Valencia Logroñés Celta Vigo
1987-88 Málaga Elche Oviedo
1988-89 Castellón Rayo Vallecano Mallorca and Tenerife
1989-90 Real Burgos Betis Espanyol
1990-91 Albacete Deportivo La Coruña
1991-92 Celta Vigo Rayo Vallecano
1992-93 Lleida Valladolid Racing Santander
1993-94 Espanyol Betis Compostela
1994-95 Mérida Rayo Vallecano Salamanca
1995-96 Hércules Logroñés Extremadura
1996-97 Mérida Salamanca Mallorca
1997-98 Alavés Extremadura Villarreal
1998-99 Málaga Atlético Madrid B[ii] Numancia, Sevilla and Rayo Vallecano
Las Palmas Osasuna Villarreal
2000-01 Sevilla Betis Tenerife
2001-02 Atlético Madrid Racing Santander Recreativo
2002-03 Murcia Zaragoza Albacete
2003-04 Levante Numancia Getafe
2004-05 Cádiz Celta Vigo Alavés
2005-06 Recreativo Gimnàstic Levante
2006-07 Valladolid Almería Murcia
2007-08 Numancia Málaga Sporting Gijón
2008-09 Xerez Zaragoza Tenerife
2009-10 Real Sociedad Hércules Levante
2010-11 Betis Rayo Vallecano Granada
2011-12 Deportivo La Coruña Celta Vigo Valladolid
2012-13 Elche Villarreal Almeria
2013-14 Eibar Deportivo La Coruña Córdoba
2014-15 Betis Sporting Gijón Las Palmas
2015-16 Alavés Leganés Osasuna
2016-17 Levante Girona Getafe
2017-18 Rayo Vallecano Huesca Valladolid
2018-19 Osasuna Granada Mallorca
2019-20 Huesca Cádiz Elche
Notelist
  1. ^ a b c d e f Not promoted
  2. ^ a b c Not promoted due to being a reserve team from a La Liga side

Champions and promotions

Club Winners Promotions Winning Years
Murcia
8
11
1939-40, 1954-55, 1962-63, 1972-73, 1979-80, 1982-83, 1985-86, 2002-03
Betis
7
12
1931-32, 1941-42, 1957-58, 1970-71, 1973-74, 2010-11, 2014-15
Deportivo La Coruña
5
11
1961-62, 1963-64, 1965-66, 1967-68, 2011-12
Sporting Gijón
5
7
1943-44, 1950-51, 1956-57, 1969-70, 1976-77
Oviedo
5
6
1932-33, 1951-52, 1957-58, 1971-72, 1974-75
Málaga*
4
13
1951-52, 1966-67, 1987-88, 1998-99
Osasuna
4
7
1952-53, 1955-56, 1960-61, 2018-19
Alavés
4
6
1929-30, 1953-54, 1997-98, 2015-16
Sevilla
4
5
1929, 1933-34, 1968-69, 2000-01
Las Palmas
4
5
1953-54, 1963-64, 1984-85, 1999-2000
Celta Vigo
3
11
1935-36, 1981-82, 1991-92
Hércules
3
8
1934-35, 1965-66, 1995-96
Valladolid
3
8
1947-48, 1958-59, 2006-07
Real Sociedad
3
6
1948-49, 1966-67, 2009-10
Granada
3
5
1940-41, 1956-57, 1967-68
Alcoyano
3
3
1944-45, 1946-47, 1949-50
Racing Santander
2
8
1949-50, 1959-60
Mallorca
2
7
1959-60, 1964-65
Elche
2
6
1958-59, 2012-13
Levante
2
5
2003-04, 2016-17
Castellón
2
4
1980-81, 1988-89
Sabadell
2
4
1942-43, 1945-46
Mérida
2
2
1994-95, 1996-97
Valencia
2
2
1930-31, 1986-87
Pontevedra
2
2
1962-63, 1964-65
Jaén
2
2
1952-53, 1955-56
Zaragoza
1
8
1977-78
Rayo Vallecano
1
7
2017-18
Cádiz
1
6
2004-05
Espanyol
1
4
1993-94
Tenerife
1
4
1960-61
Numancia
1
3
2007-08
Recreativo
1
3
2005-06
Córdoba
1
3
1961-62
Huesca
1
2
2019-20
Atlético Madrid
1
2
2001-02
Lleida
1
2
1992-93
Albacete
1
2
1990-91
Burgos CF (I)
1
2
1975-76
Eibar
1
1
2013-14
Xerez
1
1
2008-09
Real Burgos
1
1
1989-90
AD Almería
1
1
1978-79
Cultural Leonesa
1
1
1954-55
Atlético Tetuán
1
1
1950-51
Castilla
1
n/a
1983-84

Italics: shared titles
*Championships won by Málaga CF and CD Málaga

Media coverage

Spain

Broadcaster Summary Ref
Movistar+ 11 (all) matches per week, live. [28]
Gol 2 matches per week, live and free. [29]

International

All regular season matches exclusively live and free, in 155 countries on YouTube channel «LaLiga2» (exclude Spain, Balkan countries, Canada, Latin America countries, and USA), with promotion play-offs aired on several other broadcasters around the world based on this broadcasters list.[30]

Sponsorship names for seasons

  • Liga BBVA (2006-2008)
  • Liga Adelante (2008-2016)
  • LaLiga 1|2|3 (2016-2019)
  • LaLiga SmartBank (2019-present)

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Spanish: [kampeo'nato na?jo'nal de 'li?a ðe se'?unda ði?i'sjon]; "Second Division National League Championship"
  2. ^ , Spanish: [la 'li?a dos]; "The League 2"

References

  1. ^ "LaLiga2 and Santander strike title sponsorship deal". Liga Nacional de Fútbol Profesional. 21 July 2016. Retrieved 2016.
  2. ^ "Presentado el acuerdo por el que Primera División se llamará Liga BBVA y Segunda, Liga Adelante" (in Spanish). lfp.es. 4 June 2008. Archived from the original on 17 September 2008.
  3. ^ "LaLiga and Santander strike title sponsorship deal". LaLiga. 21 July 2016. Retrieved 2016.
  4. ^ Spanish League regulations 2010/11 - see pages 12-13 of pdf Archived 27 November 2010 at the Wayback Machine(in Spanish)
  5. ^ "Welcome to Visit Mallorca Estadi". RCD Mallorca. 9 June 2020. Retrieved 2020.
  6. ^ "Estadio Carlos Belmonte" (in Spanish). Football Tripper. Retrieved 2020.
  7. ^ "Información" (in Spanish). AD Alcorcón. Retrieved 2016.
  8. ^ "Estadio de los Juegos del Mediterráneo" (in Spanish). UD Almería. Retrieved 2019.
  9. ^ "Estadio Cartagonova" (in Spanish). FC Cartagena. Retrieved 2020.
  10. ^ "Estadio" (in Spanish). CD Castellón. Retrieved 2020.
  11. ^ "Facilities - RCDE Stadium". RCD Espanyol. Retrieved 2019.
  12. ^ Simón, Paco (10 September 2019). "(CF FUENLABRADA) El estadio Fernando Torres acaba de ser ampliado y ya empieza a quedarse pequeño". alcabodelacalle (in Spanish). Retrieved 2020.
  13. ^ "Montilivi" (in Catalan). Girona FC. Retrieved 2019.
  14. ^ "Gran Canaria Stadium". UD Las Palmas. Retrieved 2019.
  15. ^ "Facilities - Butarque". CD Leganés. Retrieved 2019.
  16. ^ "Estadio Anxo Carro" (in Spanish). CD Lugo. Archived from the original on 30 January 2019. Retrieved 2019.
  17. ^ "LA ROSALEDA STADIUM". Málaga CF. Retrieved 2019.
  18. ^ "Son Moix Iberostar Estadi (Son Moix)". StadiumDB. Retrieved 2019.
  19. ^ "El Estadio Municipal de Anduva". CD Mirandés. Retrieved 2019.
  20. ^ "Stadiums". Real Oviedo. Retrieved 2016.
  21. ^ "Estadio de Vallecas" (in Spanish). Rayo Vallecano. Retrieved 2018.
  22. ^ "Estadio El Toralín". SD Ponferradina. Retrieved 2019.
  23. ^ "Instalaciones". CE Sabadell FC. Retrieved 2020.
  24. ^ "El Molinón" (in Spanish). Sporting de Gijón. Retrieved 2019.
  25. ^ "Instalaciones" (in Spanish). CD Tenerife. Retrieved 2016.
  26. ^ "Estadio Las Gaunas". The Stadium Guide. Retrieved 2020.
  27. ^ "Estadio La Romareda" (in Spanish). Real Zaragoza. Retrieved 2019.
  28. ^ "Telefónica se queda Segunda División". elmundo.es (in Spanish). 21 December 2018.
  29. ^ "LaLiga adjudica dos lotes de TV más a Telefónica y Mediapro". as.com (in Spanish). 21 December 2018.
  30. ^ "LaLiga 1|2|3 matches to be broadcast via YouTube in over 155 global markets". LFP. 10 January 2019.

External links


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