Sidney Lau Romanisation
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Sidney Lau Romanisation

Sidney Lau romanisation is a system of romanisation for Cantonese that was developed in the 1970s by Sidney Lau for teaching Cantonese to Hong Kong Government expatriates. It is based on the Hong Kong Government's Standard Romanisation which was the result of the work of James D. Ball and Ernst J. Eitel about a century earlier.

Innovation

Lau's singular creative step was to indicate tonality with superscript numbers so as to do away with diacritics entirely.[1] His system was a plain attempt at simplification which proved popular with western learners of Cantonese as a second language and was initially the system of romanisation adopted by the University of Hong Kong.[2] However, the university now employs the Jyutping system for its Cantonese courses.[3]

Initials

b
/p/
?
p
/p?/
?
m
/m/
?
f
/f/
?
d
/t/
?
t
/t?/
?
n
/n/
?
l
/l/
?
g
/k/
?
k
/k?/
?
ng
/?/
?
h
/h/
?
gw
/k?/
?
kw
/k/
?
w
/w/
?
j
/ts/
?
ch
/ts?/
?
s
/s/
?
y
/j/
?

Finals

In his system, Lau treats /?/ and /o/ as allophones of one phoneme represented with "u", while they are often respectively regarded as allophones of /oe:/ and /u:/ in other systems.[4]

Coda
? /i/ /u/ /m/ /n/ /?/ /p?/ /t?/ /k?/
Vowel /a:/ a
/a:/
?
aai
/a:i?/
?
aau
/a:u?/
?
aam
/a:m/
?
aan
/a:n/
?
aang
/a:?/
?
aap
/a:p?/
?
aat
/a:t?/
?
aak
/a:k?/
?
/?/   ai
/?i?/
?
au
/?u?/
?
am
/?m/
?
an
/?n/
?
ang
//
?
ap
/?p?/
?
at
/?t?/
?
ak
/?k?/
?
/?:/
/e/
e
/?:/
?
ei
/ei?/
?
      eng
/?:?/
?
    ek
/?:k?/
?
/i:/ i
/i:/
?
  iu
/i:u?/
?
im
/i:m/
?
in
/i:n/
?
ing
/e?/
?
ip
/i:p?/
?
it
/i:t?/
?
ik
/ek?/
?
/?:/ oh
/?:/
?
oi
/?:y?/
?
o
/ou?/
?
  on
/?:n/
?
ong
/?:?/
?
  ot
/?:t?/
?
ok
/?:k?/
?
/u:/ oo
/u:/
?
ooi
/u:y?/
?
    oon
/u:n/
?
    oot
/u:t?/
?
 
/?/
/?/
  ui
/?y?/
?
    un
/?n/
?
ung
/o?/
?
  ut
/?t?/
?
uk
/ok?/
?
/oe:/ euh
/oe:/
?
        eung
/oe:?/
?
    euk
/oe:k?/
?
/y:/ ue
/y:/
?
      uen
/y:n/
?
    uet
/y:t?/
?
 
?       m
/m?/
?
  ng
//
?
     

Tones

Tone symbol Tone description Example
Romanization Word Meaning
1° or N° high flat si ? poem
ga1 je elder sister
1 high falling tim1 ? final particle expressing

the idea of addition or regret.

2 or N* mid rising si2 ? history
dik1 si6* taxi
3 mid flat si3 ? try
4 low falling si4 ? time
5 low rising si5 ? city
6 low flat si6 ? is

1° indicates the high flat tone. If ° appears after any other tones, it signifies a changed tone and that the word is to be pronounced as 1°, but 1° is not the original/normal tone of the word. Similar to °, if * appears after any tones apart from tone 2, it indicates that the word is to be pronounced as tone 2, but tone 2 is not the original/normal tone of the word.[5]

References

  1. ^ "Pronunciation Guide - Initials". Sidney Lau. Retrieved 2017.
  2. ^ Kataoka, Shin; Lee, Cream (2008). "A System without a System: Cantonese Romanization Used in Hong Kong Place and Personal Names". Hong Kong Journal of Applied Linguistics, vol. 11. Chinese University of Hong Kong.
  3. ^ "Certificate in Chinese Language courses for foreign students". School of Chinese. University of Hong Kong. Retrieved .
  4. ^ "Pronunciation Guide - Finals". Sidney Lau. Retrieved 2017.
  5. ^ "Pronunciation Guide - Tones". Sidney Lau. Retrieved 2017.

External links


  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

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