Song of the Volga Boatmen
Get Song of the Volga Boatmen essential facts below, , or join the Song of the Volga Boatmen discussion. Add Song of the Volga Boatmen to your PopFlock.com topic list for future reference or share this resource on social media.
Song of the Volga Boatmen

The "Song of the Volga Boatmen" (known in Russian as , ! [Ey, ukhnem!, "yo, heave-ho!"], after the refrain) is a well-known traditional Russian song collected by Mily Balakirev, and published in his book of folk songs in 1866.[1] It was sung by burlaks, or barge-haulers, on the Volga River. Balakirev published it with only one verse (the first). The other two verses were added at a later date. Ilya Repin's famous painting Barge Haulers on the Volga depicts such burlaks in Tsarist Russia toiling along the Volga.

The song was popularised by Feodor Chaliapin, and has been a favourite concert piece of bass singers ever since. Glenn Miller's jazz arrangement took the song to #1 in the US charts in 1941. Russian composer Alexander Glazunov based one of the themes of his symphonic poem "Stenka Razin" on the song. Spanish composer Manuel De Falla wrote an arrangement of the song, which was published under the name Canto de los remeros del Volga (del cancionero musical ruso) in 1922.[2] He did so at the behest of diplomat Ricardo Baeza, who was working with the League of Nations to provide financial relief for the more than two million Russian refugees who had been displaced and imprisoned during World War I.[2] All proceeds from the song's publication were donated to this effort.[2]Igor Stravinsky made an arrangement for orchestra.

First publications and recordings

A version of the song was recorded by Mily Balakirev (a Russian composer) from Nikolay Aleynikov in Nizhny Novgorod in 1860 or 1861. Already in 1866, the musician published it in his book A collection of Russian folk songs by (Russian: « »; 1866), with his own arrangement.[3][4][5]

Probably, the first released version of the song was recorded in Russia in 1900 by Alexander Makarov-Yunev (Russian: ) on Gramophone (#22086).[6]

Lyrics

Russian Transliteration (Poetic) English translation
, !
, !
, !
, !
, !
, !
,
?!
-, -,
A?-, -,
?.
?.
, !
, !
, !
? ?,
?.
-, -,
A?-, -,
?.
, , ? ?!
?.
, !
, !
, !
, , ?-?,
? ?,
-, -,
A?-, -,
, , ?-?
, !
, !
, !
, !
, !
Ey, ukhnyem!
Ey, ukhnyem!
Yeshcho razik, yeshcho da raz!
Ey, ukhnyem!
Ey, ukhnyem!
Yeshcho razik, yeshcho da raz!
Razovyom my byeryozu,
Razovyom my kudryavu!
Ai-da, da ai-da,
Ai-da, da ai-da,
Razovyom my kudryavu.
Razovyom my kudryavu.
Ey, ukhnyem!
Ey, ukhnyem!
Yeshcho razik, yeshcho da raz!
My po byeryezhku idyom,
Pyesnyu solnyshku poyom.
Ai-da, da ai-da,
Ai-da, da ai-da,
Pyesnyu solnyshku poyom.
Ey, Ey, tyani kanat silney!
Pyesnyu solnyshku poyom.
Ey, ukhnyem!
Ey, ukhnyem!
Yeshcho razik, yeshcho da raz!
Ekh, ty, Volga, mat'-reka,
Shiroka i gluboka,
Ai-da, da ai-da,
Ai-da, da ai-da,
Volga, Volga, mat'-reka
Ey, ukhnyem!
Ey, ukhnyem!
Yeshcho razik, yeshcho da raz!
Ey, ukhnyem!
Ey, ukhnyem!
Yo, heave ho!
Yo, heave ho!
Once more, once again, still once more
Yo, heave ho!
Yo, heave ho!
Once more, once again, still once more
Now we fell the stout birch tree,
Now we pull hard: one, two, three.
Ay-da, da, ay-da!
Ay-da, da, ay-da!
Now we pull hard: one, two, three.
Now we pull hard: one, two, three.
Yo, heave ho!
Yo, heave ho!
Once more, once again, still once more
As we walk along the shore,
To the sun we sing our song.
Ay-da, da, ay-da!
Ay-da, da, ay-da!
To the sun we sing our song.
Hey, hey, let's heave a-long the way
to the sun we sing our song
Yo, heave ho!
Yo, heave ho!
Once more, once again, still once more
Oh, you, Volga, mother river,
Mighty stream so deep and wide.
Ay-da, da, ay-da!
Ay-da, da, ay-da!
Volga, Volga, mother river.
Yo, heave ho!
Yo, heave ho!
Once more, once again, still once more
Yo, heave ho!
Yo, heave ho!

The English lyrics above fit the melody. A more accurate translation of some lines are:

Poetic Literal
Now we fell the stout birch tree, We'll untwist the stout birch tree,
Now we pull hard: one, two, three. We'll untwist the curly tree!
Hey, hey, let's heave a-long the way Hey, hey, pull this way!
Mighty stream so deep and wide. Wide and deep,

Notable recordings and arrangements

The song was arranged by Feodor Koenemann for Chaliapin. That Chaliapin's version became one of the most popular in Russia and has been released several times (e.g., in 1922, 1927, 1936).[3][7]

In 1905, Alexander Glazunov created his piece Ey, ukhnem based on the Balakirev's tune.[3][8]

A translated vocal version was sung by Paul Robeson.

The Boston Pops Orchestra conducted by Arthur Fiedler recorded the Glazunov arrangement of the tune in New York City on June 30, 1937.

The song, or at least the tune, was popularized in the mid-20th Century through an instrumental jazz version played by the Glenn Miller Band.[9] Glenn Miller released the song as an RCA Bluebird 78 single, B-11029-A, in 1941 in a swing jazz arrangement which reached no. 1 on the Billboard pop singles chart in a 10-week chart run.[10] Not in copyright, the song was not subject to the 1941 ASCAP boycott, allowing for more radio play that year.[11]

In 1965 Leonid Kharitonov with the Russian Red Army Choir released a recording.

The Swedish jazz pianist Jan Johansson arranged an instrumental version for jazz trio (Pråmdragarnas sång vid Volga) on his album "Jazz På Ryska"(1967).[12]

Modern popular culture

1941 recording by Glenn Miller, RCA Bluebird, B-11029-A.

The memorable tune of The Song of the Volga Boatmen has led to its common usage in many musical situations, particularly as background music, often with the theme of unremitting toil (or, alternatively, devotion to duty). Some uses, particularly those portending doom or despair, employ only the iconic four-note beginning; others go so far as to add new, often wryly humorous, lyrics, such as the "Birthday Dirge".[13] Some usages only acknowledge the tune's Russian heritage; very few use the original lyrics (for instance its use as the introductory theme of the Soviet boxer, Soda Popinski, in Mike Tyson's Punch-Out!!).

Instances include:

In computer games the tune is used in much the same way:

See also

References

  1. ^ Fuld, James J. (2000). The book of world-famous music: classical, popular, and folk. Courier Dover. p. 520.
  2. ^ a b c Hess, Carol A. Sacred Passions: The Life and Music of Manuel de Falla, Oxford University Press, 2005, p. 134. ISBN 0-19-514561-5.
  3. ^ a b c ?. ?. ? (1962). ", ": ""  (in Russian). . ?.
  4. ^ ? ? (in Russian).
  5. ^ ?, ?. ?. ? (in Russian).
  6. ^ ?. ?.; ? ?. ?. ? ? ? . ? ? "" (in Russian). ?.? ? . p. 235.
  7. ^ , ed. (1960). ? (in Russian). II. : . pp. 516, 517, 519.
  8. ^ ?, ?. ?. (1950). ? ? ?.?. (in Russian). . -.
  9. ^ YouTube: The Song of the Volga Boatmen.
  10. ^ Hoffmann, Frank (May 23, 2016). Chronology of American Popular Music, 1900-2000. London; New York: Routledge. p. 93. ISBN 978-0-415-97715-9. Retrieved 2016.
  11. ^ Gilliland, John (1994). Pop Chronicles the 40s: The Lively Story of Pop Music in the 40s (audiobook). ISBN 978-1-55935-147-8. OCLC 31611854. Tape 2, side B.
  12. ^ http://www.janjohansson.org/jpr.html
  13. ^ The Birthday Dirge.
  14. ^ "Gramatik - The Swing Of Justice". Retrieved .
  15. ^ Niccol, Andrew (2005-09-16), Lord of War, retrieved
  16. ^ http://www.tf2sounds.com/1793#q%3Dsing
  17. ^ http://www.tf2sounds.com/475#q%3Dsing

External links


  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

Song_of_the_Volga_Boatmen
 



 



 
Music Scenes