South Hackensack, New Jersey
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South Hackensack, New Jersey

South Hackensack, New Jersey
Township of South Hackensack
Entering South Hackensack
Entering South Hackensack
Nickname(s): 
"Bergen County's Original Small Town"[1]
Map highlighting South Hackensack's location within Bergen County. Inset: Bergen County's location within New Jersey.
Map highlighting South Hackensack's location within Bergen County. Inset: Bergen County's location within New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of South Hackensack, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of South Hackensack, New Jersey
Name is located in Bergen County, New Jersey
Name
Name
Location in Bergen County
Name is located in New Jersey
Name
Name
Location in New Jersey
Name is located in the United States
Name
Name
Location in the United States
Coordinates: 40°51?53?N 74°02?53?W / 40.864801°N 74.048115°W / 40.864801; -74.048115Coordinates: 40°51?53?N 74°02?53?W / 40.864801°N 74.048115°W / 40.864801; -74.048115[2][3]
Country
State New Jersey
CountyBergen
IncorporatedNovember 5, 1935
Government
 o TypeTownship
 o BodyTownship Committee
 o MayorJames Anzevino (D, term ends December 31, 2020)[4][5]
 o Municipal clerkDonna Gambutti[6]
Area
 o Total0.75 sq mi (1.94 km2)
 o Land0.72 sq mi (1.86 km2)
 o Water0.03 sq mi (0.08 km2)  4.27%
Area rank525th of 565 in state
70th of 70 in county[2]
Elevation13 ft (4 m)
Population
 o Total2,378
 o Estimate 
(2019)[12]
2,435
 o Rank475th of 566 in state
67th of 70 in county[13]
 o Density3,311.7/sq mi (1,278.7/km2)
 o Density rank200th of 566 in state
41st of 70 in county[13]
Time zoneUTC-05:00 (Eastern (EST))
 o Summer (DST)UTC-04:00 (Eastern (EDT))
ZIP Code
Area code(s)201[16]
FIPS code3400368970[2][17][18]
GNIS feature ID0882226[2][19]
Websitewww.southhackensacknj.org

South Hackensack is a township in Bergen County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 2,378,[9][10][11] reflecting an increase of 129 (+5.7%) from the 2,249 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 143 (+6.8%) from the 2,106 counted in the 1990 Census.[20]

South Hackensack was formed as a township by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on November 15, 1935, replacing Lodi Township, based on the results of a referendum held November 5, 1935, which passed by a margin of 309 to 15.[21][22] The township's name derives from its location relative to Hackensack.[22]

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 0.75 square miles (1.94 km2), including 0.72 square miles (1.86 km2) of land and 0.03 square miles (0.08 km2) of water (4.27%).[2][3]

As a result of the formation of boroughs within its previous limits, South Hackensack is split into three discontinguous sections. The northeastern, primary residential section is adjacent to Hackensack, Little Ferry and Teterboro. A small western portion, known as Garfield Park,[23] is sandwiched in between Garfield, Lodi, Wallington and Wood-Ridge, while a southern sliver containing only industrial properties lies in the Meadowlands between Carlstadt, Moonachie, and Ridgefield.[24][25][26]

Along with other municipalities in the Bergen County area, South Hackensack is a suburb of New York City.

Demographics

2010 Census

The 2010 United States Census counted 2,378 people, 845 households, and 613 families in the township. The population density was 3,311.7 inhabitants per square mile (1,278.7/km2). There were 879 housing units at an average density of 1,224.1 per square mile (472.6/km2). The racial makeup was 72.08% (1,714) White, 5.34% (127) Black or African American, 0.34% (8) Native American, 5.30% (126) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 14.05% (334) from other races, and 2.90% (69) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 33.31% (792) of the population.[9]

Of the 845 households, 32.3% had children under the age of 18; 49.0% were married couples living together; 16.4% had a female householder with no husband present and 27.5% were non-families. Of all households, 21.8% were made up of individuals and 10.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.81 and the average family size was 3.28.[9]

22.0% of the population were under the age of 18, 7.9% from 18 to 24, 28.6% from 25 to 44, 25.6% from 45 to 64, and 15.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39.6 years. For every 100 females, the population had 95.4 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and older there were 93.5 males.[9]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $70,500 (with a margin of error of +/- $9,389) and the median family income was $81,919 (+/- $8,497). Males had a median income of $55,250 (+/- $13,321) versus $33,472 (+/- $11,009) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $30,777 (+/- $2,660). About 3.4% of families and 6.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 5.7% of those under age 18 and 1.6% of those age 65 or over.[35]

Same-sex couples headed 5 households in 2010, an increase from the 4 counted in 2000.[36]

2000 Census

As of the 2000 United States Census[17] there were 2,249 people, 811 households, and 593 families residing in the township. The population density was 3,161.2 people per square mile (1,223.0/km2). There were 830 housing units at an average density of 1,166.6 per square mile (451.4/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 82.93% White, 2.18% African American, 0.22% Native American, 5.74% Asian, 0.31% Pacific Islander, 6.31% from other races, and 2.31% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 15.07% of the population.[33][34]

As of the 2000 Census, 36.3% of township residents were of Italian ancestry, the 11th-highest percentage of any municipality in the United States, and fourth-highest in New Jersey, among all places with more than 1,000 residents identifying their ancestry.[37]

There were 811 households, out of which 27.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.7% were married couples living together, 13.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.8% were non-families. 23.1% of all households were made up of individuals, and 9.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.77 and the average family size was 3.27.[33][34]

In the township the population was spread out, with 19.7% under the age of 18, 8.8% from 18 to 24, 31.4% from 25 to 44, 23.7% from 45 to 64, and 16.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females, there were 92.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.6 males.[33][34]

The median income for a household in the township was $57,917, and the median income for a family was $66,071. Males had a median income of $39,918 versus $32,344 for females. The per capita income for the township was $27,128. About 5.2% of families and 7.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 8.5% of those under age 18 and 6.2% of those age 65 or over.[33][34]

Government

Local government

South Hackensack is governed under the Township form of New Jersey municipal government, one of 141 municipalities (of the 565) statewide that use this form, the second-most commonly used form of government in the state.[38] The Township Committee is comprised of five members, who are elected directly by the voters at-large in partisan elections to serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year as part of the November general election in a three-year cycle.[7][39] At an annual reorganization meeting, the Township Committee selects one of its members to serve as Mayor and another as Deputy Mayor. The Township Committee is comprised entirely of residents from the main section of the township, although Garfield Park residents are active in the zoning and planning boards. While South Hackensack has its own police department serving all three portions of the township, the neighboring town of Wallington provides other emergency services for Garfield Park.[23]

As of 2020, members of the Township Committee are Mayor James A. Anzevino (D, term on committee and as mayor ends December 31, 2020), Deputy Mayor Luis E. Perdomo (D, term on committee and as deputy mayor ends 2020), Gary C. Brugger (D, 2021), Francis X. "Frank" Cagas (D, 2021) and Yris Encarnacion (D, 2022).[4][40][41][42][43][44]

Federal, state and county representation

South Hackensack is located in the 9th Congressional District[45] and is part of New Jersey's 36th state legislative district.[10][46][47] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, South Hackensack had been in the 38th state legislative district.[48]

For the 116th United States Congress, New Jersey's Ninth Congressional District is represented by Bill Pascrell (D, Paterson).[49][50] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Democrats Cory Booker (Newark, term ends 2021)[51] and Bob Menendez (Paramus, term ends 2025).[52][53]

For the 2018-2019 session (Senate, General Assembly), the 36th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Paul Sarlo (D, Wood-Ridge) and in the General Assembly by Gary Schaer (D, Passaic) and Clinton Calabrese (D, Cliffside Park).[54][55] Calabrese was sworn into office on February 8, 2018 to fill the seat of Marlene Caride, who had resigned from office on January 16, 2018 after being nominated to head the New Jersey Department of Banking and Insurance.[56][57]

Bergen County is governed by a directly elected County Executive, with legislative functions performed by a seven-member Board of Chosen Freeholders. The freeholders are elected at-large in partisan elections on a staggered basis, with two or three seats coming up for election each year; a Chairman, Vice Chairman and Chairman Pro Tempore are selected from among its seven members at a reorganization meeting held each January.[58][59] As of 2018, the County Executive is Democratic James J. Tedesco III of Paramus, whose term of office ends December 31, 2018.[60] Bergen County's Freeholders are Freeholder Chairman Thomas J. Sullivan Jr., (D, Montvale, term as freeholder ends 2019; term as freeholder chairman ends 2018),[61] Freeholder Vice-Chairwoman Germaine M. Ortiz (D, Emerson, term as freeholder ends 2019; term as freeholder vice-chairwoman ends 2018),[62] Freeholder Chairman Pro-Tempore Mary J. Amoroso (D, Mahwah, term as freeholder ends 2019; term as freeholder chairman pro-tempore ends 2018),[63] David L. Ganz (D, Fair Lawn, 2020),[64] Steve Tanelli (D, North Arlington, 2018),[65]Joan Voss (D, Fort Lee, 2020)[66] and Tracy Silna Zur (D, Franklin Lakes, 2018),[67][68][69][58] Bergen County's constitutional officials are County Clerk John S. Hogan (D, Northvale, 2021),[70][71] Sheriff Michael Saudino (D, Emerson, 2019)[72][73] and Surrogate Michael R. Dressler (D, Cresskill, 2021).[74][75][58][76]

Politics

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 1,300 registered voters in South Hackensack Township, of which 302 (23.2% vs. 31.7% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 309 (23.8% vs. 21.1%) were registered as Republicans and 688 (52.9% vs. 47.1%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There was one voter registered to another party.[77] Among the township's 2010 Census population, 54.7% (vs. 57.1% in Bergen County) were registered to vote, including 70.0% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 73.7% countywide).[77][78]

In the 2012 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 551 votes (57.2% vs. 54.8% countywide), ahead of Republican Mitt Romney with 389 votes (40.4% vs. 43.5%) and other candidates with 11 votes (1.1% vs. 0.9%), among the 963 ballots cast by the township's 1,368 registered voters, for a turnout of 70.4% (vs. 70.4% in Bergen County).[79][80] In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 541 votes (50.1% vs. 53.9% countywide), ahead of Republican John McCain with 512 votes (47.5% vs. 44.5%) and other candidates with 12 votes (1.1% vs. 0.8%), among the 1,079 ballots cast by the township's 1,385 registered voters, for a turnout of 77.9% (vs. 76.8% in Bergen County).[81][82] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 499 votes (49.9% vs. 47.2% countywide), ahead of Democrat John Kerry with 485 votes (48.5% vs. 51.7%) and other candidates with 8 votes (0.8% vs. 0.7%), among the 999 ballots cast by the township's 1,377 registered voters, for a turnout of 72.5% (vs. 76.9% in the whole county).[83]

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 56.2% of the vote (355 cast), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 37.7% (238 votes), and other candidates with 6.2% (39 votes), among the 653 ballots cast by the township's 1,343 registered voters (21 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 48.6%.[84][85] In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 333 votes (43.6% vs. 45.8% countywide), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 329 votes (43.1% vs. 48.0%), Independent Chris Daggett with 34 votes (4.5% vs. 4.7%) and other candidates with 5 votes (0.7% vs. 0.5%), among the 763 ballots cast by the township's 1,351 registered voters, yielding a 56.5% turnout (vs. 50.0% in the county).[86]

Education

Public school students in pre-kindergarten through eighth grade are served by the South Hackensack School District at Memorial School. As of the 2017-18 school year, the district, comprised of one school, had an enrollment of 296 students and 21.3 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student-teacher ratio of 13.9:1.[87] Students from Teterboro, a non-operating district, had attended the district as part of a sending/receiving relationship.[88] Teterboro, a non-operating district was merged into the Hasbrouck Heights School District following its dissolution on July 1, 2010.[89]

Students attending public school for ninth through twelfth grades attend Hackensack High School as part of a sending/receiving relationship with the Hackensack Public Schools, together with students from Maywood and Rochelle Park, with approximately 80 students from South Hackensack attending the high school as of 2012.[90][91] As of the 2017-18 school year, the high school had an enrollment of 1,898 students and 136.0 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student-teacher ratio of 14.0:1.[92]

Public school students from the borough, and all of Bergen County, are eligible to attend the secondary education programs offered by the Bergen County Technical Schools, which include the Bergen County Academies in Hackensack, and the Bergen Tech campus in Teterboro or Paramus. The district offers programs on a shared-time or full-time basis, with admission based on a selective application process and tuition covered by the student's home school district.[93][94]

Transportation

I-80 westbound in South Hackensack

Roads and highways

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 11.16 miles (17.96 km) of roadways, of which 8.57 miles (13.79 km) were maintained by the municipality, 1.60 miles (2.57 km) by Bergen County and 0.99 miles (1.59 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[95]

Interstate 80 crosses the main portion of the township,[96] while U.S. Route 46 skirts its southern border[97] and County Route 503 goes along its eastern border.[98]

Public transportation

NJ Transit provides bus service between the township and the Port Authority Bus Terminal in Midtown Manhattan on the 161 and 165 routes, to Newark on the 76 route, with local service offered on the 772 route.[99][100]

Sources

References

  1. ^ Kuperinsky, Amy. "'The Jewel of the Meadowlands'?: N.J.'s best, worst and weirdest town slogans", NJ Advance Media for NJ.com, January 22, 2015. Accessed July 12, 2016. "South Hackensack, tucked at the south end of Hackensack between Little Ferry and Teterboro, and scattered throughout Southern Bergen County as a result of some advanced Boroughitis, is known as 'Bergen County's Original Small Town,' though there's no signs."
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  14. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for South Hackensack, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed February 5, 2012.
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  16. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Sea Isle City, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed November 5, 2013.
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  25. ^ Bergen County Map of Municipalities, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed March 5, 2020.
  26. ^ New Jersey Municipal Boundaries, New Jersey Department of Transportation. Accessed November 15, 2019.
  27. ^ Census Estimates for New Jersey April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2019, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 21, 2020.
  28. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed November 5, 2013. Data for these two years is from Lodi Township.
  29. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 714. Accessed February 5, 2012.
  30. ^ Table 6. New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed February 5, 2012.
  31. ^ Bergen County Data Book 2003 Archived 2013-07-24 at the Wayback Machine, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed July 21, 2013. Note: This report shows population of 673 in 1910 (vs. 193 shown in 1930 Census report for that year). Data for years prior to formation of Township had been calculated via extrapolation.
  32. ^ Historical Population Trends in Bergen County (1900-2010), Bergen County Department of Planning & Economic Development, 2011. Accessed September 26, 2019. Data for years prior to the township's formation were extrapolated by county analysts. Data for 1910 and 1920 is for Lodi Township.
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  51. ^ About Cory Booker, United States Senate. Accessed January 26, 2015. "He now owns a home and lives in Newark's Central Ward community."
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  65. ^ Freeholder Steven A. Tanelli, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed February 24, 2018.
  66. ^ Freeholder Dr. Joan M. Voss , Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed February 24, 2018.
  67. ^ Tracy Silna Zur, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed February 24, 2018.
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  81. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Bergen County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed December 17, 2013.
  82. ^ 2008 General Election Results for South Hackensack, The Record. Accessed February 5, 2012.
  83. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Bergen County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed December 17, 2013.
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  86. ^ 2009 Governor: Bergen County Archived 2018-11-28 at the Wayback Machine, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed December 17, 2013.
  87. ^ District information for South Hackensack School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed November 1, 2019.
  88. ^ Staff. "Guide to School Elections -- Teterboro", The Record, April 4, 2001. Accessed September 4, 2008. "Teterboro sends its students to South Hackensack schools and has a three-member board that prepares its annual school budget."
  89. ^ Graham, Dr. Aaron R. Bergen County Report on Consolidation and Regionalization, Bergen County Executive County Superintendent, March 15, 2010. Accessed June 15, 2011. "Hasbrouck Heights (PK-12) and Teterboro (non-op): The two districts will form the newly merged district of Hasbrouck Heights with Teterboro, a non-operating district scheduled for elimination on July 1, 2010."
  90. ^ Tarrazi, Alexis. "Agreement reached between Maywood, Hackensack", Hackensack Chronicle, March 9, 2012. Accessed November 5, 2013. "The Maywood school district has been sending its students to Hackensack High School for decades and currently sends 250 students. The high school also serves about 120 students from Rochelle Park and 80 students from South Hackensack, according to The Record."
  91. ^ South Hackensack School District 2016 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed August 4, 2017. "Our graduating eighth grade students have qualified for honors/accelerated courses at Hackensack High School."
  92. ^ School data for Hackensack High School, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed November 1, 2019.
  93. ^ About Us, Bergen County Technical Schools. Accessed December 17, 2013.
  94. ^ Admissions, Bergen County Technical Schools. Accessed December 29, 2016.
  95. ^ Bergen County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  96. ^ U.S. Route 46 Straight Line Diagram, New Jersey Department of Transportation, March 2010. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  97. ^ Interstate 80 Straight Line Diagram, New Jersey Department of Transportation, March 2010. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  98. ^ County Route 503 Straight Line Diagram, New Jersey Department of Transportation, October 2006. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  99. ^ Bergen County Bus / Rail Connections, NJ Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of January 11, 2010. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  100. ^ Bergen County System Map, NJ Transit. Accessed September 14, 2016.

External links


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