Springboro, Ohio
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Springboro, Ohio
Springboro
City of Springboro, Ohio
Lower Springboro from the air
Lower Springboro from the air
Motto(s): 
"Live. Work. Play. Learn. Grow."
Location of Springboro, Ohio
Location of Springboro, Ohio
Location of Springboro in Warren County
Location of Springboro in Warren County
Coordinates: 39°33?20?N 84°14?00?W / 39.55556°N 84.23333°W / 39.55556; -84.23333Coordinates: 39°33?20?N 84°14?00?W / 39.55556°N 84.23333°W / 39.55556; -84.23333
CountryUnited States
StateOhio
CountiesWarren, Montgomery
Area
 o Total10.5 sq mi (24.24 km2)
 o Land10.5 sq mi (24.24 km2)
 o Water0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation774 ft (236 m)
Population
 o Total17,409
 o Estimate 
(2018[4])
18,794
 o Density1,859.9/sq mi (718.1/km2)
Time zoneUTC-5 (Eastern (EST))
 o Summer (DST)UTC-4 (EDT)
ZIP code
45066, 45342
Area code(s)937, 513
FIPS code39-74076[5]
GNIS feature ID1061205[2]
Websitehttp://www.cityofspringboro.com/

Springboro is a city in the U.S. state of Ohio. An affluent suburb of Cincinnati and Dayton, it is located mostly in Warren County in Clearcreek and Franklin Townships; with a small portion in Miami Township in Montgomery County. The city is part of the Miami Valley. As of the 2010 census, the city had a population of 17,409.[6]

Springboro is located at the geographic center of the Cincinnati-Dayton Metroplex, the 14th largest urban area in the United States.[7][8] Most of the city is located in Warren County, and is part of the Cincinnati-Middletown Metropolitan Statistical Area. The far northern portion is in Montgomery County, the central county of the Dayton Metropolitan Statistical Area. Most of Springboro is served by the Springboro Community School District and its high school, Springboro High School. In 2011, Springboro was ranked the 42nd best place to live in America by Money magazine, and in 2014 Springboro was ranked the 10th best suburb in America by Business Insider.[9][10]

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 9.36 square miles (24.24 km2), all land.[1]

Transportation

Springboro is accessible by three of the major expressways in the Cin-Day Metro Region:

  • I-75: From the Cincinnati-Dayton Trans-Metropolitan Expressway via the and Austin Blvd. exits
  • I-71: From the 3-C Highway via the Kings Mills Rd. and exits.
  • I-675: From the Greater Dayton-Bypass via Yankee Street at the exit.

The main crossroads of the city center are (Central Avenue) and (Main Street). Central Avenue runs east-west, and Main Street is the north-south thru-way, connecting the city with the urban cores of Cincinnati and Dayton. Main Street is also used as an alternate route to Interstate-75.

Springboro is served by they Greater Dayton RTA by a single bus stop on the extreme northern border of the city at Austin Landing.[11]

Dayton-Wright Brothers Airport is located on Springboro Pike, near the city's northern border along the Montgomery-Warren County line. The airport serves strictly private jets and small planes. The airport also serves as a small museum with a scale-replica of the original Wright-B Flyer. For commercial service, James M. Cox-Dayton International Airport and Cincinnati-Northern Kentucky International Airport are each about an hour north or south of the city, respectively.[12][13]

History

Settled as early as 1796, Springboro was founded in 1815 by Jonathan Wright, as "Springborough." Jonathan Wright's father Joel was a surveyor who plotted Columbus and Dayton, Ohio and Louisville, Kentucky. Springboro was predominantly Quaker during its early years.

By the 1830s, two mills and a woolen factory in Springboro had been built up on the abundant springs for which the town was named.[14]

As a stop on the Underground Railroad, Springboro played a significant role by providing hiding places for escaping slaves.[15] On October 17, 1999, Springboro was the first city to erect an Ohio Underground Railroad Historic Marker. The dedication was part of the 4th Annual Ohio Underground Railroad Summit.

Beginning in the late 1960s, Springboro's population began a boom that would redefine the city. Fueled by the growth of the Dayton Area, Springboro transformed from a sleepy town along I-75 into a real estate hotspot in the Miami Valley. Growth in Springboro led to a new highway exit being created at I-75 & Austin Boulevard and the construction of three new schools by the SCCSD in the 2000s. Today Springboro is one of the most important suburbs in the Cincinnati-Dayton metro area due to its stronghold on the growth between the two major cities. The mayor of Springboro is John H. Agenbroad, who was reelected in 2015.[16] The vast majority of new development occurred to the east of SR-741 (Main Street).

Demographics

Western Springboro (Central Ave.)

As of the 2010 U.S. Census, the median household income for the city in 2010 was $104,803, and the median family income was $105,681.[24] In 2012, the median household income rose to $116,012, making Springboro the 32nd wealthiest City/Town in the country. At the end of 2013 the median net worth per household was estimated at $1,499,516 and the per capita income for the city was $78,786, the highest out of all incorporated cities in Ohio. This ranks Springboro's 45066 zip-code as the 61st wealthiest in the United States.[25] About 0.64% of families and 1.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including ?0% of those under age 18 and 2.1% of those age 65 or over.

2010 census

As of the census[3] of 2010, there were 17,442 people, 5,996 households, and 4,871 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,859.9 inhabitants per square mile (718.1/km2). There were 6,263 housing units at an average density of 669.1 per square mile (258.3/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 92.1% White, 2.3% African American, 0.1% Native American, 3.4% Asian, 0.4% from other races, and 1.7% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.8% of the population.

There were 5,996 households of which 47.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 69.4% were married couples living together, 8.1% had a female householder with no husband present, 3.7% had a male householder with no wife present, and 18.8% were non-families. 15.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.89 and the average family size was 3.24.

The median age in the city was 36.4 years. 32.2% of residents were under the age of 18; 5% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 28.5% were from 25 to 44; 25% were from 45 to 64; and 9.3% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 48.9% male and 51.1% female.

2000 census

As of the census[5] of 2000, there were 12,380 people, 4,261 households, and 3,600 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,405.1 people per square mile (542.6/km²). There were 4,423 housing units at an average density of 502.0 per square mile (193.8/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 96.00% White, 0.99% African American, 0.16% Native American, 1.60% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.29% from other races, and 0.92% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.00% of the population.

There were 4,261 households, of which 48.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 74.8% were married couples living together, 7.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 15.5% were non-families. 13.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 3.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.90 and the average family size was 3.18.

The city's population included 32.3% under the age of 18, 5.1% from 18 to 24, 34.0% from 25 to 44, 22.3% from 45 to 64, and 6.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females, there were 95.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.9 males.

Public safety

The Springboro police department consists of twenty-five officers and a civilian staff of three. Chief Jeffrey Kruithoff is the current police chief. Approximately 11 square miles are patrolled with service provided to more than 17,000 residents. Many areas of expertise and specialization are utilized, including Special Weapons And Tactics (SWAT), bike patrol, firearms instruction, hostage negotiation, crime prevention, juvenile diversion, and D.A.R.E.

The Clearcreek Fire District provides fire protection for the City of Springboro and Clearcreek Township. Chief Steve Agenbroad oversees the department with a staff of approximately 55 firefighters. The district covers 47 square miles, from three stations staffed with 18 firefighters per day. The district responds to around 3,000 calls each year.

Education

The city lies mostly in the Springboro Community City School District. The west side of Springboro, the area west of Clearcreek-Franklin Road, is in the Franklin City School District. A small area of northwest Springboro is in the Miamisburg City School District. The Springboro Community City Schools ranked Excellent with Distinction in the 2011-2012 school year and received national recognition as a Blue-Ribbon School in 2012. According to CNN Money Magazine, Springboro boasts a perfect 100% of residents attending public and private schools, as well as an above-average college attendance rate.[26]

Springboro has the Springboro Public Library, a branch of the Franklin-Springboro Public Library.[27]

Arts and culture

Wright "B" Flyer Museum
  • 1911 Wright B Flyer Museum - Free museum, home to a flying replica of the Wright brothers' second airplane, where visitors get a chance to actually fly in the unique aircraft.
  • La Comedia Dinner Theatre - in western Springboro.

The city operates the following parks: Community Park, Clearcreek Park, E. Milo Beck, Fred Mayne Park and Rotary Park, pocket parks in the historic district, Gardner Park, North Park, and Kacie Jane Park. Springboro has been developing a bicycle network that includes bike lanes, shared lanes, and two bike hubs, SPARC and Gos, one in the historic district, and another on North Main Street (SR 741). Warren County Parks operates Kessling Park, located in the city limits.

Each September, the Springboro United Church of Christ hosts the Oktoberfest Springboro in the city center. The event features authentic German food and drink, games, and live entertainment. Proceeds benefit area charities, announced annually on the event's website.

Oktoberfest Springboro is an annual festival benefiting local charities, hosted by the Springboro United Church of Christ

Each November, the city gathers in the city center along Main Street to host Christmas in Springboro, attracting residents, vendors, and guests from around the region to launch the Christmas season.

The American flag is proudly marched down Main Street during the Christmas in Springboro parade, November 21, 2015

Springboro also has golf courses and parks. Some of the green space belongs private neighborhoods, although the city operates a public golf course, Heatherwoode Golf Course.[28]

Notable people

References

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2012-01-25. Retrieved . Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  2. ^ a b "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved .
  3. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved .
  4. ^ a b "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved 2019.
  5. ^ a b c "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved .
  6. ^ "American FactFinder2". Retrieved .
  7. ^ http://www.mydaytondailynews.com/news/news/politics-and-business-mix-in-new-cincinnati-dayton/nfXgZ/
  8. ^ http://www.bizjournals.com/cincinnati/stories/1998/11/09/story3.html
  9. ^ "Money Magazine Ranking". Archived from the original on 2012-07-29. Retrieved . Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  10. ^ http://www.businessinsider.com/best-suburbs-in-america-methodology-2014-10
  11. ^ https://www.google.com/webhp?sourceid=chrome-instant&ion=1&espv=2&ie=UTF-8#q=rta%20dayton
  12. ^ http://www.flydayton.com/index.php?page=airport-map
  13. ^ http://www.cvgairport.com/
  14. ^ Kilbourn, John (1833). The Ohio Gazetteer, or, a Topographical Dictionary. Scott and Wright. p. 425. Retrieved 2013.
  15. ^ Lovelace, Janice (May 2004). Railroad Ties. Cincinnati magazine. p. 39.
  16. ^ http://www.daytondailynews.com/news/business/springboro-attracting-firms-from-neighboring-citie/nMmWc/
  17. ^ "Population of Civil Divisions Less than Counties" (PDF). Statistics of the Population of the United States at the Tenth Census. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013.[permanent dead link]
  18. ^ "Population of Civil Divisions Less than Counties" (PDF). Statistics of the Population of the United States at the Tenth Census. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013.
  19. ^ "Population: Ohio" (PDF). 1910 U.S. Census. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013.
  20. ^ "Population: Ohio" (PDF). 1930 US Census. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013.
  21. ^ "Number of Inhabitants: Ohio" (PDF). 18th Census of the United States. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013.[permanent dead link]
  22. ^ "Ohio: Population and Housing Unit Counts" (PDF). U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013.
  23. ^ "Incorporated Places and Minor Civil Divisions Datasets: Subcounty Population Estimates: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012". U.S. Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 11 June 2013. Retrieved 2013. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  24. ^ http://www.point2homes.com/US/Neighborhood/OH/Springboro-Demographics.html
  25. ^ http://money.cnn.com/magazines/moneymag/bplive/2011/snapshots/PL3974076.html
  26. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2013-10-29. Retrieved . Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  27. ^ "Homepage". Franklin-Springboro Public Library. Retrieved 2018.
  28. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2015-02-19. Retrieved . Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)

External links


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Springboro,_Ohio
 



 



 
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