Tegin
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Tegin
Possible Hephthalite ruler. Shahi Tegin 728 CE.[1]

Tegin (Old Turkic: ?‎, romanized: Tegin, also tigin, Pinyin: Tèqín; Chinese: , erroneously Tèlè [2] ) is a Turkic title, commonly attachable to the names of the junior members of the Khagan's family.[3][4][5] However, Ligeti cast doubts on the Turkic provenance by pointing to the non-Turkic plural form tegit.[6]

History

History records many people carrying the title Tegin. The best known is Kül Tigin (; Queteqin, erroneously ; Qu?tèlè[7]), noted for the stele in his memory in the Orkhon inscriptions. Some Tegins founded and headed their own states. Alp-Tegin, founder of the Ghazni state, which grew into the Ghaznavid Empire; Arslan Tegin and Bughra Tegin, both instrumental in the creation of the Kara-Khanid Kaganate. The Chinese History of the Northern Dynasties states that the Hephthalite emperor of the Gandhara state was from a ruling clan of the neighboring Tegin state. [8] With time, the title tegin became a popular personal name, and now perseveres both as personal and family name, predominantly in the South Asia and Middle East areas.

Notable Tigins

References

  1. ^ Ancient Coin Collecting VI: Non-Classical Cultures, by Wayne G. Sayles p.81
  2. ^ Sanping Chen, "Son of Heaven and Son of God: Interactions among Ancient Asiatic Cultures regarding Sacral Kingship and Theophoric Names", Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society, Third Series, Vol. 12, No. 3 (Nov., 2002), p. 296: Writing ? instead of ? is a common script error in current editions of almost all dynastic histories
  3. ^ Jiu Tangshu vol 194 upper [1] ",;[...] [?] (ms. )" Tr. "the Kehan, in the past, was called Chanyu: [...] His sons and younger brothers are called Te[qin] (ms. Tele)"(in Chinese)
  4. ^ Xin Tangshu Vol. 215 upper [2] (in Chinese) ",,?,?,[..] ?[?] (ms. )" tr. "Till Tumen, [who] has achieved strength and greatness and is now called Kehan, formerly Chanyu, [...] [his] sons and younger brothers are called Te[qin] (ms. Tele)
  5. ^ Taskin V.S. "Materials on history of Dunhu group nomadic tribes", Moscow, 1984, p. 432
  6. ^ Ligeti, L (1975), Kiadó, A (ed.), Researches in Altaic languages, University of Michigan, p. 48
  7. ^ Sanping Chen, "Son of Heaven and Son of God: Interactions among Ancient Asiatic Cultures regarding Sacral Kingship and Theophoric Names", Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society, Third Series, Vol. 12, No. 3 (Nov., 2002), p. 296, note on misspelling
  8. ^ Zuev Yu.A. "The strongest tribe Esgil" //Materials of International Round Table, Almaty, 2004, p.44, ISBN 9965-699-14-3

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Tegin
 



 



 
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