Thallium(I) Carbonate
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Thallium I Carbonate
Thallium(I) carbonate
Names
Other names
thallium monocarbonate
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.026.759
EC Number
  • 229-434-0
Properties
Tl2CO3
Molar mass 468.776 g/mol
Appearance white crystals
Odor odorless
Density 7.11 g/cm3, solid
Melting point 272 °C (522 °F; 545 K)
5.2 g/100 mL (25 °C)
27.2 g/100 mL (100 °C)
Solubility insoluble in alcohol, ether, acetone
−101.6·10-6 cm3/mol
Structure
monoclinic
Hazards
not listed
NFPA 704 (fire diamond)
Flammability code 0: Will not burn. E.g. waterHealth code 4: Very short exposure could cause death or major residual injury. E.g. VX gasReactivity code 0: Normally stable, even under fire exposure conditions, and is not reactive with water. E.g. liquid nitrogenSpecial hazards (white): no codeNFPA 704 four-colored diamond
0
4
0
Lethal dose or concentration (LD, LC):
21 mg/kg (mouse, oral)[1]
23 mg/kg (rat, oral)[1]
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
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Infobox references

Thallium(I) carbonate is the inorganic compound with the formula (Tl2CO3. It is a white, water-soluble solid. It has no or very few commercial applications. It is produced by treatment of thallous hydroxide with CO2.[2]

Safety

Like other thallium compounds, it is extremely toxic, with an oral median lethal dose of 21 mg/kg in mice. Due to its toxicity, it is listed in the United States List of Extremely Hazardous Substances as of 2007.[3]

References

  1. ^ a b "Thallium (soluble compounds, as Tl)". Immediately Dangerous to Life and Health Concentrations (IDLH). National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH).
  2. ^ Micke, Heinrich; Wolf, Hans Uwe (2000). "Thallium and Thallium Compounds". Ullmann's Encyclopedia of Industrial Chemistry. Weinheim: Wiley-VCH. doi:10.1002/14356007.a26_607.
  3. ^ "Emergency First Aid Treatment Guide THALLOUS CARBONATE". Chemical Emergency Preparedness and Prevention. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Retrieved 2012.


Carbonates
H2CO3 He
Li2CO3,
LiHCO3
BeCO3 B C (NH4)2CO3,
NH4HCO3
O F Ne
Na2CO3,
NaHCO3,
Na3H(CO3)2
MgCO3,
Mg(HCO3)2
Al2(CO3)3 Si P S Cl Ar
K2CO3,
KHCO3
CaCO3,
Ca(HCO3)2
Sc Ti V Cr MnCO3 FeCO3 CoCO3 NiCO3 CuCO3 ZnCO3 Ga Ge As Se Br Kr
Rb2CO3 SrCO3 Y Zr Nb Mo Tc Ru Rh Pd Ag2CO3 CdCO3 In Sn Sb Te I Xe
Cs2CO3,
CsHCO3
BaCO3   Hf Ta W Re Os Ir Pt Au Hg Tl2CO3 PbCO3 (BiO)2CO3 Po At Rn
Fr Ra   Rf Db Sg Bh Hs Mt Ds Rg Cn Nh Fl Mc Lv Ts Og
?
La2(CO3)3 Ce2(CO3)3 Pr Nd Pm Sm Eu Gd Tb Dy Ho Er Tm Yb Lu
Ac Th Pa UO2CO3 Np Pu Am Cm Bk Cf Es Fm Md No Lr



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Thallium(I)_carbonate
 



 



 
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