Timeline of Glasgow History
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Timeline of Glasgow History

This article is intended to show a timeline of the history of Glasgow, Scotland, up to the present day.

500-1099

Part of a series on the
History of Scotland
Arms of Scotland
SCOTIA REGNUM cum insulis adjacentibus
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  • 543: The 12th century Bishop Jocelyn will later claim Glasgow's monastic church was founded by Saint Kentigern, also known as Saint Mungo, in this year; he also claimed that Kentigern found at Glasgow a cemetery which Saint Ninian had hallowed[1]
  • 560: Jocelyn claims Mungo/Kentigern made his first bishop in this year

1100-1199

1200-1299

1300-1399

1400-1499

1500-1599

  • c1500: Population estimate is 2,500 - 3,000[10]
  • 1504: Plague hits Glasgow; the city is eleventh among Scottish burghs for taxation revenue
  • c1510: The Bishop's Palace is extended[20]
  • 1516-1559: The city's craft guilds are incorporated
  • 1518: The university becomes more active
  • 1520: The archdiocese now includes the former diocese of Argyll
  • 1525: James Houston founds the Tron Church
  • 1535-1556: Glasgow pays 1.5% - 3% of total Scottish burgh taxes
  • 1544: Siege of castle;[21] estimated population is 3,000
  • 1556: Estimated population c4,500. Brewing recorded at site that will later become Wellpark Brewery
  • 1560: The burgh of Glasgow is now represented in the Parliament of Scotland
  • 1570: Andrew Melville rejuvenates the university
  • 1574: Plague hits the city again
  • c1576: The council mill is rebuilt
  • 1579: The city's cathedral is saved from demolition by craftsmen threatening to riot
  • 1581: Glasgow pays 66% of upper Clyde customs tax
  • 1584: Plague
  • 1589: Golf is played on Glasgow Green
  • 1593: Emergence of the Presbytery of Glasgow in the new self-governing church
  • 1594: Glasgow is now fifth in ranking of Scottish burghs, paying 4.5% of export customs

1600-1699

  • 1600: Population estimates for the city vary between 5000 and 7500
  • 1604: 361 craftsmen work in fourteen trades, including two surgeons and 213 merchants
  • 1605: The Trades House and Merchants House combine to form the first town council
  • 1610: The General Assembly approves the restoration of diocesan episcopacy in Scotland
  • 1611: Glasgow becomes a royal burgh, with a population of about 7600
  • 1615: The Jesuit John Ogilvy is hanged for saying Mass[22]
  • 1621: Glasgow pays 3%-10% of Scottish customs duties
  • 1625: The first quay is built at Broomielaw
  • 1626: The Tolbooth is constructed
  • 1636: There are 120 students at the university
  • 1638: Covenanters at the General Assembly plan to abolish bishops
  • 1639: Glasgow the 3rd richest burgh in Scotland, one-fifth as rich as Edinburgh; Hutcheson's Hospital is founded
  • 1641: Hutchesons' Grammar School is founded for orphan boys; 50 buildings erected in Trongate
  • 1645: Montrose enters city, celebrates victories
  • 1645-1646: Plague hits city[10]
  • 1649: Glasgow displaces Perth as Scotland's 4th trading centre; pays 6.5% of customs duties
  • 1650: Oliver Cromwell enters Glasgow while on a campaign against the Scottish Army[23]
  • 1652: Major fire makes about a thousand families homeless;[24] an early fire engine from Edinburgh helps put out the blaze
  • 1655: Glasgow trades in coal, hoops, meal, oats, butter, herring, salt, paper, prunes, timber, and hides: goat, kid, and deerskins
  • 1656: Glasgow is described as a "flourishing city", with "strong stone walls"
  • 1659-1665: Bridgegate merchants' house is rebuilt
  • 1660: A coal pit is reported in the Gorbals
  • 1661: Several pits reported
  • 1662: A post office opens
  • 1663: Alexander Burnet is appointed archbishop[25]
  • 1668: Land is purchased for a new harbour - later Port Glasgow[10]
  • 1669: Burnet resigns the archbishopric, objects to Act of Supremacy[25]
  • 1670: Glasgow displaces Aberdeen and Dundee to become Scotland's second trade city
  • 1673: Colonel Walter Whiteford opens city's first coffee house
  • 1675: Magistrates take action against unauthorised prayer meetings
  • 1677: Another major fire hits the city, destroying 130 shops and houses[26]
  • 1678: First stagecoaches run to Edinburgh
  • 1680: The city's population is perhaps around 12,000, with 450 traders, 100 trading overseas
  • 1688: Broomielaw Quay is reconstructed following dredging of the River Clyde
  • 1690 Glasgow is re-chartered as a royal burgh; the city has an early Bank of Scotland branch

1700-1799

  • 1702: the University of Glasgow has around 400 students
  • 1706: Anti-unionists riot;[27] Glasgow is a major smuggling port
  • 1707: Act of Union[28]
  • 1710: The city's population is estimated to be 13,000; over 200 shops are open; much of the city is liable to flooding
  • 1712: Glasgow owners own 4% of Scottish fleet, 46 vessels
  • 1715: Glasgow Courant newspaper first published[29]
  • 1718: Possible date for first Glasgow vessel to sail to America
  • 1719: Cotton printing has begun
  • 1720: Glasgow's estimated population is 15,000
  • 1721-1735: James Anderson builds "Andersontown" (modern-day Anderston) village
  • 1725: Glasgow occupied by General Wade's army; protests and street violence against liquor tax
  • 1726: Daniel Defoe describes Glasgow as "The cleanest and best-built city in Britain"; 50 ships a year sail to America
  • 1729: The Glasgow Journal newspaper is published
  • 1730: The Glasgow Linen Society is formed
  • 1735: The city's ship-owners own 67 ships
  • 1736: The first history of Glasgow is published by John McUre
  • 1737-1760: A new Town Hall is built west of the Tolbooth
  • 1738: The Anderston Weavers' Society is formed
  • 1740: Approximately 685,000 m of linen is made in Glasgow, some of which is sent to London. Hugh and Robert Tennent take over the Drygate Brewery
  • 1740-1741: The Foulis brothers begin printing
  • 1742: Delft pottery is manufactured in the city
  • 1743: The Foulis brothers become printers to the university
  • 1745: Charles Edward Stuart (Bonnie Prince Charlie) enters the city with his army;[30]Tennents open a new brewery in Glasgow
  • 1749: A stage coach service opens between Edinburgh and Glasgow
  • 1750: There are five sugar refineries in the city
  • 1751: The John Smith bookshop is established
  • 1753: Foulis Academy is established at the university to promote art and design; turnpiking of main roads from Glasgow; the city's involvement in the tobacco trade is reflected in the naming of Virginia Street
  • 1755: The estimated population of Glasgow is 23,500[27]
  • 1757: 2.2 million metres of linen are produced in the city
  • 1760: Glasgow enjoys a wave of prosperity; there are 13 professors at Glasgow University
  • 1762: Joseph Black discovers latent heat
  • 1763: David Dale opens a draper's shop in the city; regular coaches run from Glasgow to Greenock
  • 1769: Tennents brewers is now a large industry; James Watt patents his steam engine condenser
  • 1771: The Scottish economy is boosted by trade through Glasgow
  • 1775: Trade with America in tobacco, sugar, and cotton - the city's prosperity is at its height
  • 1776: Adam Smith, a professor at Glasgow University, publishes Wealth of Nations[31]
  • 1779: Mobs protest against the Catholic Relief Act
  • 1780: The estimated population of Glasgow is 42,000;[27] the construction of the Forth and Clyde Canal is completed
  • 1781: Vessels of over 30 tons can now reach Broomielaw Quay
  • 1782-1783: The Forth and Clyde Canal enables grain from London to ease famine in Glasgow
  • 1783: Glasgow Chamber of Commerce is founded, it is the first in Britain[31]
  • 1785: A hot air balloonist flies from Glasgow to Hawick in the Borders; the firm of Thomsons is formed as bankers
  • 1794: Glasgow Royal Infirmary opens[32]
  • 1796: The Royal Technical College (which will later become The University of Strathclyde) is founded
  • 1798: The Merchant Banking Company of Glasgow fails
  • 1799: Demonstrations over bread prices; trade in tobacco and rum declines

1800-1899

1900-1999

2000-2018

See also

References

  • Lynch, edited by Michael (2001). The Oxford companion to Scottish history. Oxford: Oxford University Press. ISBN 0-19-211696-7.CS1 maint: extra text: authors list (link)
  • Williamson, Elizabeth; Riches, Anne; Higgs, Malcolm (2005). Glasgow. New Haven, Conn. [u.a.]: Yale Univ. Press. ISBN 978-0-300-09674-3.
  • Naughton, Nuala (2014). Glasgow's East End: From Bishops to Barraboys. Random House. p. 33. ISBN 9781780577975.
  • Foreman, Carol (2002). Lost Glasgow : Glasgow's lost architectural heritage. Birlinn. ISBN 978-1-84158-278-8.

Notes

  1. ^ Bright, William (1896). The Roman See in the Early Church. London: Longmans, Green, & Co. p. 406 (footnote). Retrieved 2008.
  2. ^ a b "Glasgow Cathedral, excluding scheduled monument SM90150, 70 Cathedral Square, Glasgow". portal.historicenvironment.scot. Retrieved 2018.
  3. ^ Naughton, Nuala (2014). Glasgow's East End: A Social History. Mainstream Publishing Company, Limited. p. 325. ISBN 9781780576527.
  4. ^ a b Lynch 2001, p. 266
  5. ^ Foreman 2002, p. 3
  6. ^ "Glasgow, Dominican Friary". canmore.org.uk. Retrieved 2018.
  7. ^ Naughton 2014, p. 33
  8. ^ Durie, Bruce (29 February 2012). Bloody Scottish History: Glasgow. History Press. ISBN 9780752483139.
  9. ^ Foreman 2002, p. 12
  10. ^ a b c d Lynch 2001, p. 267
  11. ^ Campbell, R. H.; Skinner, A. S. (2014). Adam Smith. Routledge. p. 58. ISBN 9781135175023.
  12. ^ "Biography of William Elphinstone". www.universitystory.gla.ac.uk. Retrieved 2018.
  13. ^ "Aberdeen Breviary - National Library of Scotland". www.nls.uk. Retrieved 2018.
  14. ^ a b Naughton 2014, p. 21
  15. ^ "University of Glasgow :: Story :: The Papal Bull". www.universitystory.gla.ac.uk. Retrieved 2017.
  16. ^ Maxwell, Ian (2017). Tracing Your Glasgow Ancestors: A Guide for Family and Local Historians. Pen and Sword. p. 112. ISBN 9781473867239.
  17. ^ "St Nicholas Hospital - Glasgow, Strathclyde - Places of Worship in Scotland | SCHR". www.scottishchurches.org.uk. Retrieved 2017.
  18. ^ a b Williamson, Riches and Higgs 2005, p. 624
  19. ^ "Biography of Robert Blackadder". www.universitystory.gla.ac.uk. Retrieved 2018.
  20. ^ Foreman 2002, p. 8
  21. ^ Foreman 2002, p. 9
  22. ^ "10th March 1615 - Death of John Ogilvie". www.glasgowlife.org.uk. Retrieved 2018.
  23. ^ Foreman 2002, p. 66
  24. ^ Foreman 2002, p. 40
  25. ^ a b "Biography of Alexander Burnet". www.universitystory.gla.ac.uk. Retrieved 2018.
  26. ^ Cleland, James (1832). Enumeration of the inhabitants of the city of Glasgow and county of Lanark, for the government census of 1831: with population and statistical tables relative to England and Scotland. Smith. p. 247.
  27. ^ a b c "British History in depth: 18th-century Glasgow". BBC History. Retrieved 2018.
  28. ^ Foreman 2002, p. 75
  29. ^ Lynch 2001, p. 452
  30. ^ Foreman 2002, p. 93
  31. ^ a b c d Lynch 2001, p. 269
  32. ^ Foreman 2002, p. 112
  33. ^ Lynch 2001, p. 268
  34. ^ "Object : City of Glasgow Police 'B' Div Plaque". www.bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 2018.
  35. ^ Taylor, Alan (2016). Glasgow: The Autobiography. Birlinn. p. 35. ISBN 9780857909183.
  36. ^ Foreman 2002, p. 79
  37. ^ a b c Lynch 2001, p. 270
  38. ^ "Mall is beautiful: Argyll Arcade returns to golden days". www.scotsman.com. Retrieved 2018.
  39. ^ Foreman 2002, p. 139
  40. ^ Foreman 2002, p. 131
  41. ^ "18th May 1843 - The Disruption". www.glasgowlife.org.uk. Retrieved 2018.
  42. ^ Foreman 2002, p.73
  43. ^ Foreman 2002, p. 130
  44. ^ a b "Glasgow Buchanan Street Station". Canmore.org.uk. Retrieved 2017.
  45. ^ Williamson, Riches and Higgs 2005, p. 205
  46. ^ "Queen Victoria, Queen of the United Kingdom (1819-1901) - Loch Katrine from the steamer". www.royalcollection.org.uk. Retrieved 2018.
  47. ^ "Insanitary City: Henry Littlejohn and the Condition of Edinburgh | Reviews in History". www.history.ac.uk. Retrieved 2018.
  48. ^ "Dr Pritchard the Poisoner and the 1865 Valuation Rolls". National Records of Scotland. 31 May 2013. Retrieved 2018.
  49. ^ Foreman 2002, p. 143
  50. ^ Morrison, Jenny (11 June 2017). "Three figures of Scotland's oldest club share what makes Queen's Park special". dailyrecord. Retrieved 2018.
  51. ^ "Rangers Football Club Born 1872, died 2012". HeraldScotland. Retrieved 2018.
  52. ^ Foreman 2002, p. 147
  53. ^ "Partick Thistle FC". www.dailyrecord.co.uk. Retrieved 2018.
  54. ^ "140th anniversary of the founding of The Mitchell Library to be celebrated during National Libraries Week". Glasgow Life. Retrieved 2019.
  55. ^ "Boys Brigade Long Service Badge". www.bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 2018.
  56. ^ "BBC - A Sporting Nation - The Founding of Celtic Football Club 1888". www.bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 2017.
  57. ^ a b "Glasgow International Exhibition". special.lib.gla.ac.uk. Retrieved 2017.
  58. ^ "Glasgow Crematorium". The Gazetteer for Scotland. Retrieved 2018.
  59. ^ "On this day in 1896: The Glasgow Subway opens". www.scotsman.com. Retrieved 2018.
  60. ^ a b "Ibrox Disasters - Rangers Football Club, Official Website". Rangers Football Club, Official Website. Retrieved 2017.
  61. ^ Mullin, Katherine (2016). Working Girls: Fiction, Sexuality, and the Modern. Oxford University Press. p. 185. ISBN 9780198724841.
  62. ^ Williamson, Riches and Higgs 2005, p. 208
  63. ^ Williamson, Riches and Higgs 2005, p. 279
  64. ^ a b "Glasgow School of Art's library restoration begins in earnest". The Guardian. 24 November 2016. Retrieved 2017.
  65. ^ Iain., McLean (1983). The legend of red Clydeside. Edinburgh: Donald. ISBN 0859760952. OCLC 60098253.
  66. ^ Williamson, Riches and Higgs 2005, p. 269
  67. ^ Castella, Tom de (29 September 2014). "Queen Mary: Liner that helped launch monster cruise ships". BBC News. Retrieved 2017.
  68. ^ "Duke Street Prison". www.theglasgowstory.com. Retrieved 2017.
  69. ^ Williamson, Riches and Higgs 2005, p. 147
  70. ^ "Glasgow, St Enoch Station". canmore.org.uk. Retrieved 2017.
  71. ^ "Travel chaos after tunnel fault closes Glasgow subway stations". Evening Times. Retrieved 2017.
  72. ^ Williamson, Riches and Higgs 2005, p. 616
  73. ^ "Discover the museum bringing women to the forefront in history and the future". The Independent. 9 July 2018. Retrieved 2019.
  74. ^ "University History". www.gcu.ac.uk. Retrieved 2017.
  75. ^ "Clyde Auditorium". www.discoverglasgow.org. Retrieved 2017.
  76. ^ "New York of the North". The Guardian. 17 January 1999. Retrieved 2017.
  77. ^ "Open shop for building challenge". heraldscotland.com. Retrieved 2017.
  78. ^ "Glasgow's millennium party plans unveiled". news.bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 2017.
  79. ^ "Who have been Scotland's first ministers?". BBC News. 16 May 2016. Retrieved 2017.
  80. ^ "UEFA Champions League 2001/02 - History - Leverkusen-Real Madrid Lineups - UEFA.com". Uefa.com. Retrieved 2017.
  81. ^ "Remembering Glasgow's Floods of 2002". scotsman.com. Retrieved 2017.
  82. ^ Carrell, Severin (9 November 2006). "Three jailed for life for race murder of schoolboy". The Guardian. London. Retrieved 2010.
  83. ^ "Glasgow launches Commonwealth bid". news.bbc.co.uk. 16 August 2005. Retrieved 2017.
  84. ^ "Kelvingrove set to reveal £28m overhaul - Design Week". Design Week. 29 June 2006. Retrieved 2017.
  85. ^ "UEFA Europa League 2006/07 - History - Espanyol-Sevilla - UEFA.com". Uefa.com. 16 May 2007. Retrieved 2017.
  86. ^ "Blazing car crashes into airport". news.bbc.co.uk. 30 June 2007. Retrieved 2017.
  87. ^ "GlasgowGlasgow wins race for 2014 Games". news.bbc.co.uk. 9 November 2007. Retrieved 2017.
  88. ^ Lindsay, Clive (14 May 2008). "Zenit St Petersburg 2-0 Rangers". BBC. BBC Sport. Retrieved 2020.
  89. ^ "Rangers Football Club enters administration". BBC. BBC Sport. 14 February 2012. Retrieved 2020.
  90. ^ "Rangers FC voted into Scottish Third Division". BBC. BBC Newsround. 13 July 2012. Retrieved 2020.
  91. ^ "London 2012 Olympic Games to kick off at Hampden Park in Glasgow". Daily Record. 15 February 2011. Retrieved 2015.
  92. ^ "Date announced for Clutha crash inquiry". BBC News. 10 August 2018. Retrieved 2018.
  93. ^ "Glasgow - the host city of the 2014 Commonwealth Games". thecgf.com. Archived from the original on 6 June 2017. Retrieved 2017.
  94. ^ "Glasgow bin lorry crash driver Harry Clarke in court on dangerous driving charge". BBC News. 17 March 2016. Retrieved 2017.
  95. ^ "Rangers 1-1 Hamilton Academical". BBC. BBC Sport. 6 August 2016. Retrieved 2020.
  96. ^ "Major fire devastates Glasgow School of Art". BBC News. 16 June 2018. Retrieved 2018.

Further reading

Published in the 18th century
  • John Tait's Directory for the City of Glasgow, Glasgow, 1783. (1871 reprint)
  • Jones's Directory; or, Useful Pocket Companion for the year 1787. Glasgow.. (1887 reprint)
Published in the 19th century
Published in the 20th century

  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

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