Tragic Overture
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Tragic Overture

The Tragic Overture (German: Tragische Ouvertüre), Op. 81, is a concert overture for orchestra written by Johannes Brahms during the summer of 1880. It premiered on 26 December 1880 in Vienna. Most performances last between twelve and fifteen minutes.

Brahms chose the title "tragic" to emphasize the turbulent, tormented character of the piece, in essence a free-standing symphonic movement, in contrast to the mirthful ebullience of a companion piece he wrote the same year, the Academic Festival Overture. Despite its name, the Tragic Overture does not follow any specific dramatic program. Brahms summed up the effective difference in character between the two overtures when he declared "one laughs while the other cries." Brahms quotes some material from the last movement of the Second Symphony in this overture.[]

Structure

The Tragic Overture comprises three main sections, all in the key of D minor.

  1. Allegro ma non troppo
  2. Molto più moderato
  3. Tempo primo ma tranquillo.

Analysis

Theorists have disagreed in analyzing the form of the piece: Jackson finds Webster's multifarious description rather obscurist and prefers to label the work's form as a "reversed sonata design" in which the second group is recapitulated before the first, with Beethoven's Coriolan Overture as a possible formal model.[1]

Instrumentation

The work is scored for piccolo, two flutes, two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons, four horns, two trumpets, three trombones, tuba, timpani, and strings.

References

  1. ^ Timothy L. Jackson, "Bruckner and tragic reversed sonata form" Bruckner Studies 1997, Cambridge University Press, pp. 172-178

External links

  • Tragic Overture, Op. 81: Scores at the International Music Score Library Project (IMSLP)
  • Orrin, Howard. Program Notes: Tragic Overture, Op. 81 (archived 2016)
  • Hansen, Kelly Dean (October 14, 2008). "Listening Guide: Tragic Overture (D minor), OP. 81". Brahms Listening Guides. - (Using a recording by Claudio Abbado and the Berlin Philharmonic.)
  • Pascall, Robert, ed. (2008). Brahms: Biographical, Documentary and Analytical Studies. Cambridge University Press. ISBN 978-0-521-24522-7.

  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

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