Washington's 3rd Congressional District
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Washington's 3rd Congressional District

Washington's 3rd congressional district
WA CD 03-2013.pdf
Representative
Population (2000)654,898
Median income$66,030[1]
Ethnicity
Cook PVIR+4[2]

Washington's 3rd congressional district encompasses the southernmost portion of western and central Washington. It includes the counties of Lewis, Pacific, Wahkiakum, Cowlitz, Clark, Skamania, and Klickitat, as well as a small sliver of southern Thurston county. The 3rd District is represented by Republican Jaime Herrera Beutler.

Established after the 1900 census, the Third District was represented by Democrats for most of the latter half of the 20th century, until Rep. Jolene Unsoeld was defeated by Republican Linda Smith as part of the Republican Revolution of 1994. Smith retired after two terms, and was succeeded by Democrat Brian Baird. Baird announced he wouldn't run for re-election in 2010, with Republican Jaime Herrera Beutler winning the now open seat in the 2010 general election 53%-47% against Democratic state Representative Denny Heck, who was subsequently elected in Washington's 10th congressional district. Herrera Beutler retained her seat 60%-40% over Democrat Jon T. Haugen in 2012. In 2014, she beat Democratic nominee Bob Dingethal by 61.5% to 38.5%.

In presidential elections, the 3rd District is rather competitive. It is the only part of western Washington that didn't swing heavily to the Democrats during the 1990s, and is one of the few districts in the area that cannot be considered safe for either party. It is home to Lewis County, far and away the most conservative county in western Washington. Additionally, most of the district is located in the Portland, Oregon, market; voting patterns there are somewhat different from those in the areas closer to Seattle. George W. Bush narrowly carried the district in 2000 with 48% of the vote and again in 2004 with 50%. The district swung Democratic in 2008, giving Barack Obama 52% of the vote and 46% to John McCain. However, redistricting (see below) extended the district further east and made it slightly more Republican than its predecessor; had the current boundaries been in effect for the 2008 election, Obama would have only defeated McCain by 50.9 percent to 47.1 percent. In 2012, it gave Mitt Romney 49.6% to Obama's 47.9%. In the 2016 presidential election, Republican nominee Donald Trump won the district 49.9% to Hillary Clinton's 42.5%. Trump won every county entirely within the district except Clark County, which he lost by only 316 votes out of over two hundred thousand, including carrying three counties (Pacific, Wahkiakum and Cowlitz) that voted for Walter Mondale in 1984.

The district from 2003 to 2013

Recent results from presidential races

Year Office Results
1952 President Eisenhower 54 - 46%
1956 President Eisenhower 52 - 48%
1960 President Kennedy 50 - 50%
1964 President Johnson 70 - 30%
1968 President Humphrey 52 - 42%
1972 President Nixon 58 - 42%
1976 President Carter 50 - 46%
1980 President Reagan 50 - 38%
1984 President Reagan 53 - 45%
1988 President Dukakis 51 - 47%
1992 President Clinton 42 - 33%
1996 President Clinton 49 - 38%
2000 President Bush 48 - 47%
2004 President Bush 50 - 48%
2008 President Obama 52 - 46%
2012 President Romney 49 - 47%[3]
2016 President Trump 49 - 42%[3]

List of members representing the district

Member Party Term Cong
ress
Electoral history
District created March 4, 1909
MilesPoindexter.jpg
Miles Poindexter
Republican March 4, 1909 -
March 3, 1911
61st Elected in 1908.
Retired to run for U.S. senator.
William La Follette (Washington state Congressman).jpg
William La Follette
Republican March 4, 1911 -
March 3, 1915
62nd
63rd
Elected in 1910.
Re-elected in 1912.[4]
Redistricted to the 4th district.
AlbertJohnsonWA.jpg
Albert Johnson
Republican March 4, 1915 -
March 3, 1933
64th
65th
66th
67th
68th
69th
70th
71st
72nd
Redistricted from the 2nd district and re-elected in 1914.[5]
Re-elected in 1916.
Re-elected in 1918.
Re-elected in 1920.
Re-elected in 1922.
Re-elected in 1924.
Re-elected in 1926.
Re-elected in 1928.
Re-elected in 1930.
Lost re-election.
MartinFSmith.jpg
Martin F. Smith
Democratic March 4, 1933 -
January 3, 1943
73rd
74th
75th
76th
77th
Elected in 1932.
Re-elected in 1934.
Re-elected in 1936.
Re-elected in 1938.
Re-elected in 1940.
Lost re-election.
Fred B. Norman (Washington state Congressman).jpg
Fred B. Norman
Republican January 3, 1943 -
January 3, 1945
78th Elected in 1942.
Lost re-election.
Representative Charles R. Savage, 1973.jpg
Charles R. Savage
Democratic January 3, 1945 -
January 3, 1947
79th Elected in 1944.
Lost re-election.
Fred B. Norman (Washington state Congressman).jpg
Fred B. Norman
Republican January 3, 1947 -
April 18, 1947
80th Elected in 1946.
Died.
Vacant April 18, 1947 -
July 7, 1947
Russell V. Mack.jpg
Russell V. Mack
Republican July 7, 1947 -
March 28, 1960
80th
81st
82nd
83rd
84th
85th
86th
Elected to finish Norman's term.
Re-elected in 1948.
Re-elected in 1950.
Re-elected in 1952.
Re-elected in 1954.
Re-elected in 1956.
Re-elected in 1958.
Died.
Vacant March 28, 1960 -
November 8, 1960
Julia Hansen.jpg
Julia Butler Hansen
Democratic November 8, 1960 -
December 31, 1974
86th
87th
88th
89th
90th
91st
92nd
93rd
Elected to finish Mack's term.
Re-elected in 1962.
Re-elected in 1964.
Re-elected in 1966.
Re-elected in 1968.
Re-elected in 1970.
Re-elected in 1972.
Retired and resigned.
Vacant December 31, 1974 -
January 3, 1975
Don Bonker.jpg
Don Bonker
Democratic January 3, 1975 -
January 3, 1989
94th
95th
96th
97th
98th
99th
100th
Elected in 1974.
Re-elected in 1976.
Re-elected in 1978.
Re-elected in 1980.
Re-elected in 1982.
Re-elected in 1984.
Re-elected in 1986.
Retired.
Jolene Unsoeld.jpg
Jolene Unsoeld
Democratic January 3, 1989 -
January 3, 1995
101st
102nd
103rd
Re-elected in 1988.
Re-elected in 1990.
Re-elected in 1992.
Lost re-election.
LindaSmithWA.jpg
Linda Smith
Republican January 3, 1995 -
January 3, 1999
104th
105th
Elected in 1994.
Re-elected in 1996.
Retired to run for U.S. senator.
Brian Baird.jpg
Brian Baird
Democratic January 3, 1999 -
January 3, 2011
106th
107th
108th
109th
110th
111th
Re-elected in 1998.
Re-elected in 2000.
Re-elected in 2002.
Re-elected in 2004.
Re-elected in 2006.
Re-elected in 2008.
Retired.
Jaime Herrera Beutler, official portrait, 112th Congress.jpg
Jaime Herrera Beutler
Republican January 3, 2011 -
present
112th
113th
114th
115th
116th
Elected in 2010.
Re-elected in 2012.
Re-elected in 2014.
Re-elected in 2016.
Re-elected in 2018.

Recent election results

2010

2010 United States House of Representatives elections in Washington: 3rd district[6]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jaime Herrera Beutler 152,799 52.97%
Democratic Denny Heck 135,654 47.03%
Total votes 288,453 100.0%
Republican gain from Democratic

2012

2012 United States House of Representatives elections in Washington: 3rd district[7]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jaime Herrera Beutler (Incumbent) 177,446 60.4%
Democratic Jon T. Haugen 116,438 39.6%
Total votes 293,884 100.0%
Republican hold

2014

2014 United States House of Representatives elections in Washington: 3rd district[8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jaime Herrera Beutler (Incumbent) 124,796 61.5%
Democratic Bob Dingethal 78,018 38.5%
Total votes 202,814 100.0%
Republican hold

2016

2016 United States House of Representatives elections in Washington: 3rd district[9]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jaime Herrera Beutler (Incumbent) 193,457 61.8%
Democratic Jim Moeller 119,820 38.3%
Total votes 313,277 100.0%
Republican hold

2018

2018 United States House of Representatives elections in Washington: 3rd district[10]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jaime Herrera Beutler (Incumbent) 161,819 52.7%
Democratic Carolyn Long 145,407 47.3%
Total votes 307,226 100.0%
Republican hold

Census 2010 Redistricting

The Washington State Redistricting Commission is charged with adjusting congressional and legislative district boundaries after each decennial census. Given Washington State's growth over the previous decade, Washington gained an additional congressional district for the 113th congress. The third district needed to lose 106,894 people in the redistricting process in order to meet the ideal population of 672,454.[11] On September 13, 2011, the four voting commissioners on the Redistricting Commission submitted draft proposals for the congressional map. All four draft proposals left the entirety of Lewis, Wahkiakum, Cowlitz, and Clark Counties, and all or most of Skamania county in the 3rd district. In addition, each proposal added population from one or more of Pacific, Thurston, Pierce, or Klickitat counties.[12][13][14][15]

The final approved map for the 3rd district includes the entirety of Klickitat, Skamania, Clark, Cowlitz, Wahkiakum, Pacific, and Lewis counties, with the extreme southern part of Thurston county south of highway 12, Washington State Route 507, and the Vail Cut Off Road.[16]

See also

References

Specific
  1. ^ "My Congressional District". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2019.
  2. ^ "Partisan Voting Index - Districts of the 115th Congress" (PDF). The Cook Political Report. April 7, 2017. Retrieved 2017.
  3. ^ a b "Daily Kos Elections' presidential results by congressional district for 2016, 2012, and 2008". dailykos.com. Retrieved 2018.
  4. ^ "Our Campaigns - WA District 3 Race - Nov 05, 1912". www.ourcampaigns.com.
  5. ^ "Our Campaigns - WA District 3 Race - Nov 03, 1914". www.ourcampaigns.com.
  6. ^ "November 02, 2010 General Election". Secretary of State. State of Washington. Retrieved 2019.
  7. ^ "November 06, 2012 General Election". Secretary of State. State of Washington. Retrieved 2019.
  8. ^ "November 4, 2014 General Election". Secretary of State. State of Washington. Retrieved 2019.
  9. ^ "November 8, 2016 General Election". November 8, 2016 General Election. Washington Secretary of State. Retrieved 2019.
  10. ^ "November 6, 2018 General Election Results". Washington Secretary of State. State of Washington. Retrieved 2019.
  11. ^ "2010 Congressional Malapportionment Report" (PDF). Washington State Redistricting Commission. Retrieved 2011.
  12. ^ Ceis, Tim. "Draft Congressional Plan #1 - Commissioner Ceis - September 13, 2011" (PDF). Washington State Redistricting Commission. Retrieved 2011.
  13. ^ Gorton, Slade. "Draft Congressional Plan #1 - Commissioner Gorton - September 13, 2011" (PDF). Washington State Redistricting Commission. Retrieved 2011.
  14. ^ Foster, Dean. "Draft Congressional Plan #1 - Commissioner Foster - September 13, 2011" (PDF). Washington State Redistricting Commission. Retrieved 2011.
  15. ^ Huff, Tom. "Draft Congressional Plan #1 - Commissioner Huff - September 13, 2011" (PDF). Washington State Redistricting Commission. Retrieved 2011.
  16. ^ "Congressional District 3" (PDF). Washington Redistricting Commission. Retrieved 2012.
General
  • Martis, Kenneth C. (1989). The Historical Atlas of Political Parties in the United States Congress. New York: Macmillan Publishing Company.
  • Martis, Kenneth C. (1982). The Historical Atlas of United States Congressional Districts. New York: Macmillan Publishing Company.
  • Congressional Biographical Directory of the United States 1774-present Their final version was approved and sent to the legislature on January 1, 2012.

External links

Coordinates: 46°30?N 122°48?W / 46.500°N 122.800°W / 46.500; -122.800


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