Windsor County, Vermont
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Windsor County, Vermont
Windsor County
Windsor County courthouse in Woodstock
Windsor County courthouse in Woodstock
Map of Vermont highlighting Windsor County
Location within the U.S. state of Vermont
Map of the United States highlighting Vermont
Vermont's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 43°33?30?N 72°31?59?W / 43.55827°N 72.53299°W / 43.55827; -72.53299
Country
State Vermont
Founded1781
Shire TownWoodstock
Largest townHartford
Area
 o Total977 sq mi (2,530 km2)
 o Land969 sq mi (2,510 km2)
 o Water7.4 sq mi (19 km2)  0.8%%
Population
 o Total56,670
 o Estimate 
(2018)
55,286
 o Density58/sq mi (22/km2)
Time zoneUTC-5 (Eastern)
 o Summer (DST)UTC-4 (EDT)
Congressional districtAt-large
Websitewww.swcrpc.org

Windsor County is a county located in the U.S. state of Vermont. As of the 2010 census, the population was 56,670.[1] The shire town (county seat) is the town of Woodstock.[2] The county's largest municipality is the town of Hartford.

History

Windsor County is one of several Vermont counties created from land ceded by the State of New York on 15 January 1777 when Vermont declared itself to be a distinct state from New York.[3][4][5] The land originally was contested by Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and New Netherland, but it remained undelineated until July 20, 1764 when King George III established the boundary between Province of New Hampshire and Province of New York along the west bank of the Connecticut River, north of Massachusetts and south of the parallel of 45 degrees north latitude. New York assigned the land gained to Albany County.[6][7] On March 12, 1772 Albany County was partitioned to create Charlotte County,[8] and this situation remained until Vermont's independence from New York and Britain.

Windsor County was established on February 16, 1781 from parts of Cumberland County and organized the same year.[9]

Windsor County is notable for being the birthplace (1805) of Joseph Smith, Jr., founder of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 977 square miles (2,530 km2), of which 969 square miles (2,510 km2) is land and 7.4 square miles (19 km2) (0.8%) is water.[10] It is the largest county by area in Vermont.

Adjacent counties

National parks

Major highways

Demographics

2000 census

As of the 2000 census,[16] there were 57,418 people, 24,162 households, and 15,729 families residing in the county. The population density was 59 people per square mile (23/km²). There were 31,621 housing units at an average density of 33 per square mile (13/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 97.72% White, 0.33% Black or African American, 0.23% Native American, 0.63% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.15% from other races, and 0.91% from two or more races. 0.82% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 20.1% were of English, 12.9% Irish, 10.9% American, 9.9% French, 7.7% German, 6.7% French Canadian and 5.5% Italian ancestry. 96.4% spoke English and 1.5% French as their first language.

There were 24,162 households out of which 29.20% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.70% were married couples living together, 9.00% had a female householder with no husband present, and 34.90% were non-families. 28.10% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.10% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.35 and the average family size was 2.86. In the county, the population was spread out with 23.30% under the age of 18, 5.90% from 18 to 24, 27.30% from 25 to 44, 27.60% from 45 to 64, and 15.80% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41 years. For every 100 females, there were 94.80 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.10 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $40,688, and the median income for a family was $59,002. Males had a median income of $42,648 versus $25,696 for females. The per capita income for the county was $22,369. About 3.20% of families and 5.70% of the population were below the poverty line, including 7.50% of those under age 18 and 7.60% of those age 65 or over.

In 2007, the census department estimated that Windsor had the oldest average age in the state, 44.7. This compares with the actual census in 2000 of 41.3 years.[17]

2010 census

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 56,670 people, 24,753 households, and 15,420 families residing in the county.[18] The population density was 58.5 inhabitants per square mile (22.6/km2). There were 34,118 housing units at an average density of 35.2 per square mile (13.6/km2).[19] The racial makeup of the county was 96.3% white, 0.9% Asian, 0.6% black or African American, 0.3% American Indian, 0.2% from other races, and 1.7% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 1.2% of the population.[18]

Of the 24,753 households, 25.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.1% were married couples living together, 9.0% had a female householder with no husband present, 37.7% were non-families, and 30.0% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.25 and the average family size was 2.77. The median age was 45.8 years.[18]

The median income for a household in the county was $50,893 and the median income for a family was $63,387. Males had a median income of $44,610 versus $34,150 for females. The per capita income for the county was $29,053. About 5.6% of families and 9.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 12.5% of those under age 18 and 7.6% of those age 65 or over.[20]

Politics

In 1828, Windsor County was won by National Republican Party candidate John Quincy Adams.

In 1832, the county was won by Anti-Masonic Party candidate William Wirt.

From William Henry Harrison in 1836 to Winfield Scott in 1852, the county would be won by Whig Party candidates.

From John C. Frémont in 1856 to Richard Nixon in 1960 (barring 1912, when the county was won by Progressive Party candidate and former president Theodore Roosevelt), the Republican Party would have a 104-year winning streak in the county.

In 1964, Windsor County was won by Democratic Party incumbent President Lyndon B. Johnson, who became not only the first Democratic presidential candidate to win the county, but the first to win the state of Vermont entirely.

Following the Democrats victory in 1964, the county went back to voting for Republican candidates for another 20 year winning streak starting with Richard Nixon in 1968 and ending with George H. W. Bush in 1988, who became the last Republican presidential candidate to win the county.

Bill Clinton won the county in 1992 and it has been won by Democratic candidates ever since.

Presidential elections results
Presidential elections results[21]
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2016 28.8% 8,605 58.7% 17,556 12.6% 3,767
2012 30.0% 8,598 67.9% 19,494 2.1% 607
2008 29.2% 9,084 68.8% 21,444 2.0% 637
2004 37.4% 11,491 60.3% 18,561 2.3% 715
2000 40.2% 11,713 51.9% 15,140 7.9% 2,294
1996 30.8% 8,015 54.1% 14,070 15.1% 3,938
1992 31.0% 9,035 47.5% 13,871 21.5% 6,286
1988 50.5% 12,584 48.2% 12,009 1.4% 337
1984 58.0% 14,054 40.7% 9,869 1.3% 324
1980 45.7% 10,470 35.2% 8,067 19.1% 4,366
1976 55.8% 11,001 42.0% 8,282 2.2% 433
1972 63.6% 12,421 35.8% 6,989 0.6% 122
1968 56.5% 9,795 40.3% 6,986 3.3% 566
1964 32.5% 5,859 67.5% 12,163 0.0% 1
1960 66.9% 12,657 33.1% 6,250 0.0% 2
1956 78.7% 14,157 21.2% 3,820 0.0% 5
1952 78.5% 13,941 21.3% 3,791 0.2% 37
1948 71.0% 9,626 27.5% 3,736 1.5% 206
1944 66.1% 9,930 33.9% 5,089
1940 62.3% 9,109 37.5% 5,475 0.2% 28
1936 64.9% 9,489 34.8% 5,084 0.3% 49
1932 67.2% 9,353 31.2% 4,343 1.7% 231
1928 79.5% 10,739 20.3% 2,747 0.2% 29
1924 88.4% 10,223 8.8% 1,015 2.8% 322
1920 82.6% 8,400 16.9% 1,714 0.6% 61
1916 64.5% 4,236 33.8% 2,216 1.7% 111
1912 37.5% 2,409 20.3% 1,302 42.3% 2,716
1908 81.6% 4,683 15.8% 907 2.6% 148
1904 83.7% 4,830 13.8% 797 2.4% 141
1900 84.3% 5,227 15.2% 943 0.6% 34
1896 88.0% 6,128 9.7% 674 2.3% 160
1892 76.8% 4,753 21.5% 1,329 1.7% 108
1888 75.5% 5,163 21.3% 1,457 3.2% 220
1884 75.5% 5,163 21.3% 1,457 3.2% 220
1880 77.3% 6,122 22.0% 1,740 0.7% 59

Transportation

In 2009, the United States Department of Transportation measured 113.6 miles (182.8 km) of "major arteries", the highest in the state.[22]

Because US Route 4 had the "feel" of a highway, motorists were inclined to speed. As a result, the Windsor County Sheriff's Department wrote 2,452 tickets in 2007.[23]

Communities

Towns

Villages

Villages are census divisions, but have no separate corporate existence from the surrounding towns.

Census-designated places

Unincorporated communities

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011.
  3. ^ Slade, William, Jr., comp. Vermont State Papers: Being a collection of Records and Documents Connected with the Assumption and Establishment of Government by the People of Vermont, Together with the Journal of the Council of Safety, the First Constitution, the Early Journals of the General Assembly, and the Laws from the Year 1779 to 1786, Inclusive. Middlebury, 1823. P. 70-73.
  4. ^ Van Zandt, Franklin K. Boundaries of the United States and the Several States. Geological Survey Professional Paper 909. Washington, DC; Government Printing Office, 1976. The Standard Compilation for its subject. P. 64.
  5. ^ Williamson, Chilton. Vermont in Quandary: 1763-1825. Growth of Vermont series, Number 4. Montpelier: Vermont Historical Series, 1949. PP. 82-84; map facing 95, 100-102, 112-113.
  6. ^ Slade, William, Jr., comp. Vermont State Papers: Being a collection of Records and Documents Connected with the Assumption and Establishment of Government by the People of Vermont, Together with the Journal of the Council of Safety, the First Constitution, the Early Journals of the General Assembly, and the Laws from the Year 1779 to 1786, Inclusive. Middlebury, 1823. pp.13-19.
  7. ^ Van Zandt, Franklin K. Boundaries of the United States and the Several States. Geological Survey Professional Paper 909. Washington, DC; Government Printing Office, 1976. The Standard Compilation for its subject. P. 63.
  8. ^ New York Colonial Laws, Chapter 1534; Section 5; Paragraph 321)
  9. ^ "Vermont: Individual County Chronologies". Vermont Atlas of Historical County Boundaries. The Newberry Library. 2008. Retrieved 2015.
  10. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved 2015.
  11. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved 2019.
  12. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2015.
  13. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved 2015.
  14. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed. (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2015.
  15. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Retrieved 2015.
  16. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved .
  17. ^ Sutkowski, Matt (August 7, 2008). Census: State older, a little more diverse. Burlington Free Press.
  18. ^ a b c "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2016.
  19. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2016.
  20. ^ "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS - 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2016.
  21. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved .
  22. ^ Heath, Brad; McLean, Dan (September 25, 2009). "Funds bypass worst roads". Burlington Free Press. pp. 1A.
  23. ^ Shinn, Peggy (January 18, 2009). "Not so fast (or else) on these Vermont highways". Boston Globe. Retrieved 2019.

External links

Coordinates: 43°34?N 72°34?W / 43.57°N 72.57°W / 43.57; -72.57


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Windsor_County,_Vermont
 



 



 
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