Youri Djorkaeff
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Youri Djorkaeff

Youri Djorkaeff
Youri Djorkaeff 2011.jpg
Djorkaeff in 2011
Personal information
Full name Youri Raffi Djorkaeff[1]
Date of birth (1968-03-09) 9 March 1968 (age 51)
Place of birth Lyon, France
Height 1.80 m (5 ft 11 in)[2]
Playing position Attacking midfielder
Forward
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1984-1989 Grenoble 82 (23)
1989-1990 Strasbourg 35 (25)
1990-1995 Monaco 155 (59)
1995-1996 Paris Saint-Germain 35 (13)
1996-1999 Inter Milan 87 (30)
1999-2002 Kaiserslautern 55 (14)
2002-2004 Bolton Wanderers 75 (20)
2004 Blackburn Rovers[3] 3 (0)
2005-2006 New York Red Bulls[4] 45 (12)
Total 584 (196)
National team
1993 France B 2 (3)
1993-2002 France 82 (28)
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only

Youri Raffi Djorkaeff (French pronunciation: ​[ju?i raffi djka?f]; born 9 March 1968) is a French former professional footballer who played as an attacking midfielder and a forward. With the French national team, Djorkaeff won the 1998 FIFA World Cup and Euro 2000. He is the son of former player Jean Djorkaeff. He currently runs the Youri Djorkaeff Foundation.

Biography

Djorkaeff was born to a French father of Polish and Kalmyk origin, Jean Djorkaeff, and an Armenian mother, Mary Ohanian,[5] in Lyon.[6]

Club career

Djorkaeff started his career in 1984 with French club Grenoble, before moving to RC Strasbourg in 1989, AS Monaco in 1990, and then Paris Saint-Germain in 1995. In 1994, Djorkaeff led Division 1 in goals with 20. He won the UEFA Cup Winners' Cup with PSG in 1996.

In 1996, he signed with Italian club Inter Milan, where he won the UEFA Cup in 1998. In 1999, he transferred to Germany and Kaiserslautern, helping them to the semi-finals of the UEFA Cup in 2001.

Djorkaeff turned many heads when signing with English club Bolton Wanderers in 2002, but added a lot of class to the team during his three seasons there, resulting in the creation of an international "dream-team" alongside the tricky Nigerian Jay-Jay Okocha, and former Real Madrid midfielder Iván Campo. He then transferred to Blackburn Rovers but left the club after playing in only three games.

Djorkaeff then signed with the MetroStars of Major League Soccer in February 2005, turning down higher paid offers from other countries. He became the first French player to play in MLS and ended the season as the team's MVP with ten goals and seven assists in league play.

Djorkaeff announced from the beginning that he would hang-up his boots at the end of 2006 season, and played for the re-branded New York Red Bulls.[7] On 1 July 2006, he was spotted in the crowd with French fans at the FIFA World Cup quarter-final match between France and Brazil after telling Red Bulls officials he left the club to attend to "an unexpected, serious family matter in France." Upon his return, he revealed that the purpose of his departure was to be with his sick mother and downplayed watching the World Cup match.[8]

He retired from professional football on 29 October 2006.

International career

Djorkaeff accumulated 82 caps and scored 28 goals for France at senior level between 1993 and 2002. Other than the two major tournaments he won with the national side - the 1998 FIFA World Cup and UEFA Euro 2000 - Djorkaeff also played for his country in UEFA Euro 1996 and the 2002 FIFA World Cup. In the 1998 FIFA World Cup Final in Paris, he set-up Zinedine Zidane's second goal from a corner in an eventual 3-0 victory over defending champions Brazil.[9]

Style of play

Nicknamed The Snake, due to his ability to get past defenders and bend the ball,[10][11][12] Djorkaeff was a talented playmaker, who usually played as an attacking midfielder, although he was also capable of playing in playing in deeper positions in midifeld - namely as a central midfielder -, or in more attacking roles, as a creative second striker, or even as an outright striker, while he often feeatured in a wide role on the left flank at international level.[10][12][13][14][15][16][17][18] An elegant and technically gifted player, he was mainly known for his flair, dribbling skills, and excellent touch on the ball; he was also known for his vision, passing, composure, and class, and possessed a good shot, which enabled him both to score or create goals.[10][19][20][21][22][23] He was known for his positional sense and intelligent movement off the ball, as well as his ability to lose his markers with his attacking runs and create space for himself, or provide depth to the team;[12][24] he was also highly regarded for his accuracy from free kicks and penalties with his right foot.[12][19][25][26] A hard-working player, who was known for his defensive contribution off the ball,[13][19] he had the ability to link the defence with the attack or drift out wide in a free role in midifeld;[10][12][27] as such, his playing style and role has been described as that of a "nine and a half," half-way between that of a midfielder and that of a forward,[20] which from a tactical standpoint, however, occasionally made it difficult for managers to find the right position for him on the pitch that best suited his capabilities.[13][14][28] Despite his talent and success, he was accused of being inconsistent at times in the media.[29]

Personal life

Djorkaeff has a wife, Sophie, and three children: Sacha, Oan and Angelica. Djorkaeff released a singing single called "Vivre dans Ta Lumière", translated to "Living in Your Light" from French.[30] His father, Jean, and younger brother, Micha Djorkaeff, were also professional football players.[10]

On 15 November 2012 Djorkaeff hosted Phone-a-thon for Armenian charity held in Europe. The Phoneathon benefits the construction of community centers in villages throughout Nagorno Karabakh and comprehensive agricultural development in Armenia's Tavush Region. In addition, a part of the proceeds will be dedicated to providing urgent aid to the Syrian-Armenian community.[31]

During his time in England, Djorkaeff opened a football school in Armenia.[11] After retiring, he became the president of his childhood club in Lyon, Union Generale Armenienne de Decines, in April 2007.[32] Djorkaeff currently also runs the Youri Djorkaeff Foundation, a non-profit organisation dedicated to providing football programs in New York City.[33]

Career statistics

Club

Club performance[34][35][36] League National Cup League Cup Continental Total
Season Club League Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals
France League Coupe de
France
Coupe de la
Ligue
Europe Total
1984-85 Grenoble Division 2 3 0 - - - - 3 0
1985-86 6 0 0 - - - - 6 0
1986-87 26 4 - - - - 26 4
1987-88 19 8 1+ - - - - 20 8
1988-89 25 11 3 1 - - - - 28 12
1989-90 3 0 0 0 - - - - 3 0
1989-90 Strasbourg 28 21 - - - - 28 21
1990-91 7 4 0 0 - - - - 7 4
1990-91 Monaco Division 1 20 5 6 1 - - - - 26 6
1991-92 35 9 5 0 - - 7 1 47 10
1992-93 32 11 2 2 - - 4 1 38 14
1993-94 35 20 2 0 - - 11 3 48 23
1994-95 33 14 1 0 3 0 - - 37 14
1995-96 Paris Saint-Germain 35 13 2 2 1 0 8 4 46 19
Italy League Coppa Italia League Cup Europe Total
1996-97 Inter Milan Serie A 33 14 6 1 - - 10 2 49 17
1997-98 29 8 4 0 - - 9 0 42 8
1998-99 25 8 6 4 - - 5 2 36 14
Germany League DFB-Pokal DFL-Ligapokal Europe Total
1999-2000 Kaiserslautern Bundesliga 25 11 1 0 0 0 5 2 31 13
2000-01 26 3 2 0 0 0 7 2 35 5
2001-02 4 0 - - - - - - 4 0
England League FA Cup League Cup Europe Total
2001-02 Bolton Wanderers Premier League 12 4 2 0 1 0 0 0 14 4
2002-03 36 7 1 0 1 0 0 0 38 7
2003-04 27 9 2 0 5 1 0 0 33 10
2004-05 Blackburn Rovers 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0[37]
USA League Open Cup League Cup North America Total
2005 MetroStars Major League
Soccer
24 10 2 1 - - - - 26 11
2006 New York Red Bulls 21 2 1 0 - - - - 22 2
Total France 307 120 22 6 4 0 30 9 363 135
Italy 87 30 16 5 - - 24 4 127 39
Germany 55 14 3 0 - - 12 4 70 18
England 78 20 1 0 5 1 - - 84 21
USA 45 12 3 1 - - - - 48 13
Career total 572 196 45 12 9 1 66 17 692 226

International

France national team[38]
Year Apps Goals
1993 1 0
1994 5 3
1995 7 5
1996 12 5
1997 6 3
1998 18 3
1999 9 3
2000 11 4
2001 7 2
2002 6 0
Total 82 28

Honours

Monaco[39]

Paris Saint-Germain[39]

Inter Milan[39]

Bolton Wanderers

France[39]

Individual

Orders

References

  1. ^ a b "Décret du 24 juillet 1998 portant nomination à titre exceptionnel" [Decree of 24 July 1998 appointing on an exceptional basis]. Journal Officiel de la République Française (in French). 1998 (170): 11376. 25 July 1998. PREX9801916D. Retrieved 2019.
  2. ^ Youri Djorkaeff at Soccerbase. Retrieved 21 December 2018.
  3. ^ "Youri Djorkaeff". www.premierleague.com. Retrieved 2019.
  4. ^ The club was known as the MetroStars prior to 2006.
  5. ^ "Famous Armenian Sportspeople". 30 September 2016.
  6. ^ ? - ? (in Russian). . 31 March 1999.[permanent dead link]
  7. ^ "uefa.com - Football Europe - News & Features - News Specific". Archived from the original on 19 May 2006.
  8. ^ "Djorkaeff returns to Bulls after a month away". bigapplesoccer.com. 7 August 2006. Archived from the original on 10 March 2012. Retrieved 2011.
  9. ^ Crosetti, Maurizio (7 June 2014). "Infallibile Zidane quando con la testa fece meraviglie". La Repubblica (in Italian). Retrieved 2019.
  10. ^ a b c d e "Jean Djorkaeff: Youri had to impose himself". FIFA.com. 24 May 2005. Archived from the original on 17 September 2016.
  11. ^ a b Wallace, Sam (22 February 2003). "Djorkaeff happy with his taste of life in the shadows". The Telegraph. Retrieved 2019.
  12. ^ a b c d e Gabrielli, Fabrizio (18 May 2015). "Youri Djorkaeff: uomo e calciatore". www.ultimouomo.com/. Retrieved 2019.
  13. ^ a b c Nicola Cecere; Franco Arturi (16 April 1997). "Pagliuca, i sogni dietro la porta". La Gazzetta dello Sport (in Italian).
  14. ^ a b Gianni Piva (3 March 1998). "Ronaldo e Djorkaeff mai la stessa coppia". la Repubblica (in Italian). p. 50.
  15. ^ "Djorkaeff's Dream Comes True". The New York Times. 22 February 2005. Retrieved 2019.
  16. ^ Johnson, Jonathan (18 June 2014). "Ranking France's 5 Greatest Wingers of All Time". Bleacher Report. Retrieved 2019.
  17. ^ "Youri Djorkaeff". BBC Sport. Retrieved 2019.
  18. ^ "Djorkaeff trots into Zidane's shoes". The Guardian. 30 May 2002. Retrieved 2019.
  19. ^ a b c Enrico Currò (22 August 1996). ""Cerco la perfezione". L'idea fissa di Djorkaeff". la Repubblica (in Italian). p. 41.
  20. ^ a b Gianni Mura (14 October 1996). "Dribbling e tiro. È la musica di Djorkaeff" (in Italian). la Repubblica. p. 36.
  21. ^ Davis, Noah (27 February 2012). "What Ever Happened To ... Youri Djorkaeff". MLS Soccer. Retrieved 2019.
  22. ^ "Fulham's EPL future secure". theworldgame.sbs.com.au. 17 April 2014. Retrieved 2019.
  23. ^ Thorpe, Lee (14 June 2011). "English Premier League: Ranking 60 of the Best Overseas Players in EPL History". Bleacher Report. Retrieved 2019.
  24. ^ Corrado Sannucci (21 February 1999). "Rispetto Baggio ma la nostra difesa è molto più forte". la Repubblica (in Italian). p. 47.
  25. ^ Alessandro Baretti (23 March 2014). "Pagliuca spiega i segreti di Pirlo". Tutto Sport (in Italian).
  26. ^ Atturo, Emanuele (5 May 2019). "A chi affidereste il rigore da cui dipende la vostra vita?". www.ultimouomo.com. Retrieved 2019.
  27. ^ "No fear for Milan man". The Irish Times. 8 July 1998. Retrieved 2019.
  28. ^ Gianni Mura (7 January 1999). "L'Inter affonda a Parma tradita anche da Baggio". la Repubblica (in Italian). p. 42.
  29. ^ Granello, Licia (22 May 1997). "PAGLIUCA IL MIGLIORE DJORKAEFF NON BASTA". La Repubblica (in Italian). Retrieved 2019.
  30. ^ Dart, James (22 August 2007). "Does Shay Given really carry holy water with him at every match?". The Guardian. London. Retrieved 2011.
  31. ^ "Phone-a-thon for Armenian charity held in Europe ahead of 24-hour Thanksgiving Day Telethon". Armenia Now. Armenia. 16 November 2012. Retrieved 2012.
  32. ^ "Ten years on". FIFA.com. 9 July 2008. Retrieved 2019.
  33. ^ "Our MISSION". www.youridjorkaeff.org. Retrieved 2019.
  34. ^ "Youri Djorkaeff". footballdatabase.eu. Retrieved 2012.
  35. ^ "Youri DJORKAEFF". level-k.com. Retrieved 2011.
  36. ^ "Youri Djorkaeff". world-soccer.org. Archived from the original on 20 February 2005. Retrieved 2011.
  37. ^ "Youri Djorkaeff". www.statbunker.com. Retrieved 2019.
  38. ^ "Youri Djorkaeff - International Matches". RSSSF. Retrieved 2011.
  39. ^ a b c d "Youri Djorkaeff" (in French). www.lequipe.fr. Retrieved 2019.
  40. ^ "Boro lift Carling Cup". BBC Sport. 29 February 2004. Retrieved 2019.
  41. ^ "France - Topscorers". RSSSF.com. Retrieved 2014.
  42. ^ "UEFA Euro 2008 Information" (PDF). UEFA. p. 88. Retrieved 2008.
  43. ^ "All-Star Macca". Sunday Mirror. The Free Library. 30 June 1996. Retrieved 2012.
  44. ^ Inter.it staff, inter(a t)inter.it (17 November 2006). "F.C. Internazionale Milano". Inter Milan. Retrieved 2017.
  45. ^ FIFA XI´s Matches - Full Info

External links

Bibliography


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