1973 American Samoan Constitutional Referendum
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1973 American Samoan Constitutional Referendum

A constitutional referendum was held in American Samoa on 6 November 1973.[1] Voters were asked to whether they approved of a new constitution,[2] The new constitution provided for the direct election of the Governor and Lieutenant Governor, a doubling of the salaries for members of the Fono,[3] issuing government bonds to raise money, and decentralising some powers to counties and villages.[2]

As with the previous referendum in 1972, the proposals were rejected, with 34% in favour and 66% against.

Results

The new constitution was expected to be approved, but was rejected by nearly two-thirds of voters.[4]

Choice Votes %
For 1,097 34.3
Against 2,097 65.7
Invalid/blank votes -
Total 3,194 100
Registered voters/turnout 6,435
Source: PIM

Aftermath

An identical measure on directly electing the Governor would be put before voters two more times in 1974 and August 1976 until it was approved in November 1976.

References

  1. ^ Samoans Turn Down New Constitution The New York Times, 11 November 1973
  2. ^ a b Samoans reject constitution Pacific Islands Monthly, December 1973, p6
  3. ^ Turning point for American Samoans Pacific Islands Monthly, December 1973, p21
  4. ^ There were reasons enough why A. Samoans went conservative Pacific Islands Monthly, January 1974, p41

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