2004 Philadelphia Phillies Season
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2004 Philadelphia Phillies Season

2004 Philadelphia Phillies
Major League affiliations
Location
Results
Record86-76 (.531)
Divisional place2nd
Other information
Owner(s)Bill Giles
General manager(s)Ed Wade
Manager(s)Larry Bowa, Gary Varsho
Local televisionWPSG
CSN Philadelphia
Local radioWPEN
(Harry Kalas, Larry Andersen, Chris Wheeler, Scott Graham)
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The 2004 Philadelphia Phillies season was the 122nd season in the history of the franchise. The Phillies finished in second-place in the National League East with a record of 86-76, ten games behind the Atlanta Braves, and six games behind the NL wild-card champion Houston Astros. The Phillies were managed by their former shortstop Larry Bowa (85-75) and Gary Varsho (1-1), who replaced Bowa on the penultimate day of the season. The Phillies played their first season of home games at Citizens Bank Park, which opened April 12, with the visiting Cincinnati Reds defeating the Phillies, 4-1.

Offseason

Regular season

A season of high expectations due to notable offseason moves was a disappointment, costing manager Larry Bowa his job towards season's end.

Season standings

National League East

NL East W L Pct. GB Home Road
Atlanta Braves 96 66 0.593 -- 49-32 47-34
Philadelphia Phillies 86 76 0.531 10 42-39 44-37
Florida Marlins 83 79 0.512 13 42-38 41-41
New York Mets 71 91 0.438 25 38-43 33-48
Montreal Expos 67 95 0.414 29 35-45 32-50


Record vs. opponents


Source: [1]
Team ARI ATL CHC CIN COL FLA HOU LAD MIL MON NYM PHI PIT SD SF STL AL
Arizona -- 2-4 4-2 3-3 6-13 3-4 2-4 3-16 3-3 0-6 3-4 1-5 2-4 7-12 5-14 1-5 6-12
Atlanta 4-2 -- 3-3 2-4 4-2 14-5 3-3 4-3 4-2 15-4 12-7 10-9 4-2 3-3 4-3 2-4 8-10
Chicago 2-4 3-3 -- 9-8 5-1 3-3 10-9 2-4 10-7 3-3 4-2 3-3 13-5 4-2 2-4 8-11 8-4
Cincinnati 3-3 4-2 8-9 -- 3-3 4-2 6-11 4-2 10-8 4-2 3-3 3-3 9-10 2-4 3-3 5-14 5-7
Colorado 13-6 2-4 1-5 3-3 -- 1-5 1-5 8-11 2-4 2-4 1-5 5-3 2-4 10-9 8-11 1-5 8-10
Florida 4-3 5-14 3-3 2-4 5-1 -- 3-3 3-3 4-2 11-8 15-4 12-7 1-5 4-2 2-5 2-4 7-11
Houston 4-2 3-3 9-10 11-6 5-1 3-3 -- 1-5 13-6 2-4 2-4 6-0 12-5 2-4 2-4 10-8 7-5
Los Angeles 16-3 3-4 4-2 2-4 11-8 3-3 5-1 -- 3-3 4-3 3-3 1-5 6-0 10-9 10-9 2-4 10-8
Milwaukee 3-3 2-4 7-10 8-10 4-2 2-4 6-13 3-3 -- 5-1 2-4 0-6 6-12 2-4 1-5 8-9 8-4
Montreal 6-0 4-15 3-3 2-4 4-2 8-11 4-2 3-4 1-5 -- 9-10 7-12 4-2 1-6 1-5 3-3 7-11
New York 4-3 7-12 2-4 3-3 5-1 4-15 4-2 3-3 4-2 10-9 -- 8-11 1-5 1-6 4-2 1-5 10-8
Philadelphia 5-1 9-10 3-3 3-3 3-5 7-12 0-6 5-1 6-0 12-7 11-8 -- 3-3 5-1 2-4 3-3 9-9
Pittsburgh 4-2 2-4 5-13 10-9 4-2 5-1 5-12 0-6 12-6 2-4 5-1 3-3 -- 3-3 5-1 5-12 2-10
San Diego 12-7 3-3 2-4 4-2 9-10 2-4 4-2 9-10 4-2 6-1 6-1 1-5 3-3 -- 12-7 2-4 8-10
San Francisco 14-5 3-4 4-2 3-3 11-8 5-2 4-2 9-10 5-1 5-1 2-4 4-2 1-5 7-12 -- 3-3 11-7
St. Louis 5-1 4-2 11-8 14-5 5-1 4-2 8-10 4-2 9-8 3-3 5-1 3-3 12-5 4-2 3-3 -- 11-1


Notable transactions

Citizens Bank Park

Citizens Bank Park (right), the newest (2004) of the four venues which now make up Philadelphia's "Sports Complex", the four decade old Wachovia Spectrum (center), its oldest (1967) facility, tree lined S. Broad St. (left), and the city's expansive skyline along the horizon to the North, as viewed from the roof of the Wachovia Center (1996). (Composite panoramic digital image by Bruce C. Cooper, DigitalImageServices.com)

Citizens Bank Park is a 43,647-seat baseball-only stadium in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania that opened on April 3, 2004, and hosted its first regular-season baseball game on April 12 of that same year, as the tenants of the facility, the Philadelphia Phillies lost to the Cincinnati Reds, 4-1. The ballpark was built to replace the now-demolished Veterans Stadium (a football/baseball multipurpose facility), and features natural grass and dirt playing field and also features a number of Philadelphia style food stands, including several which serve cheesesteaks, hoagies, and other regional specialties. Behind center field is Ashburn Alley, named after Phillies great center fielder and Hall of Famer Richie Ashburn, a walkway featuring restaurants and memorabilia from Phillies history, along with a restaurant/bar and grille called "Harry The K's" named after Hall of Fame broadcaster Harry Kalas.

The plague marking the landing point of Jim Thome's 400th career home run.
  • Randy Wolf of the Phillies threw the first pitch at 1:32 PM US EDT on April 12, 2004, to D'Angelo Jiménez of the Reds, who got the park's first hit, a leadoff double. Bobby Abreu of the Phillies hit the first home run, which also served as the franchise's first hit in the club's new home. Reds pitcher Paul Wilson earned the first win in that game and Danny Graves earned the park's first save.
  • On June 14, 2004, Jim Thome hit his 400th career home run to the left-center field seats at Citizens Bank Park.[4]

2004 game log

Legend
  Phillies win
  Phillies loss
  Postponement
Bold Phillies team member

Roster

Player stats

Pat Burrell with the Phillies, September 2004

Batting

Starters by position

Note: Pos = Position; G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in

Pos Player G AB H Avg. HR RBI

Other batters

Note: G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in

Player G AB H Avg. HR RBI

Pitching

Starting pitchers

Player G IP W L ERA SO

Other pitchers

Player G IP W L ERA SO

Relief pitchers

Player G W L SV ERA SO

Farm system

[6][7]

References

  1. ^ https://www.baseball-reference.com/w/wagnebi02.shtml
  2. ^ https://www.baseball-reference.com/h/hincha.01.shtml
  3. ^ Ricky Ledée Statistics Baseball-Reference.com
  4. ^ "BASEBALL: ROUNDUP; Thome Hits 400th Home Run of Career". The New York Times. June 15, 2004. Retrieved 2009.
  5. ^ "2004 Philadelphia Phillies Schedule, Box Scores and Splits". Baseball-Reference.com.
  6. ^ Johnson, Lloyd, and Wolff, Miles, ed., The Encyclopedia of Minor League Baseball, 3rd edition. Durham, North Carolina: Baseball America, 2007
  7. ^ Baseball America 2005 Annual Directory

External links


  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

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